Friday, October 30, 2015
Nearly 1 in 10 Americans has Type 2 diabetes, but even that astonishing number understates the toll in Philadelphia. Obesity is a major risk factor, but so are age, family history, having had diabetes while pregnant, and ethnicity. Still, people with type 2 can take charge, Thomas Jefferson University medical student and artist Mike Natter offers an easy-to-digest anatomy lesson.
Nearly 1 in 10 Americans has Type 2 diabetes, but even that astonishing number understates the toll in Philadelphia. Obesity is a major risk factor, but so are age, family history, having had diabetes while pregnant, and ethnicity. Still, people with type 2 can take charge, Thomas Jefferson University medical student and artist Mike Natter offers an easy-to-digest anatomy lesson.
When we eat carbohydrates, our digestive system breaks them down into sugar, also known as glucose.
The glucose gets absorbed into the bloodstream.
The bloodstream delivers the glucose to all of the cells of the body.
But without insulin, the cell “doors” are locked and glucose cannot get in.
The pancreas makes insulin “keys” that open the cell doors and allow glucose to go from the bloodstream into the cells. BUT...In type 2 diabetes, the lock on the door is broken (that’s called insulin resistance) and won’t respond to the insulin keys. So the glucose stays in the bloodstream.
High levels of glucose in the bloodstream, left uncontrolled over long periods, can cause many problems, such as neuropathy (severe pain and loss of sensation in extremities), cardiovascular disease, kidney problems, eye problems, and many others.
BUT WAIT !!!
THERE’S HOPE !!!


A healthy diet, regular exercise, and medication when indicated can help control levels of glucose in the bloodstream. In fact, the sooner you take charge, the better off you’ll be.
When we eat carbohydrates, our digestive system breaks them down into sugar, also known as glucose.
The glucose gets absorbed into the bloodstream.
The bloodstream delivers the glucose to all of the cells of the body.
But without insulin, the cell “doors” are locked and glucose cannot get in.
The pancreas makes insulin “keys” that open the cell doors and allow glucose to go from the bloodstream into the cells. BUT...In type 2 diabetes, the lock on the door is broken (that’s called insulin resistance) and won’t respond to the insulin keys. So the glucose stays in the bloodstream.
High levels of glucose in the bloodstream, left uncontrolled over long periods, can cause many problems, such as neuropathy (severe pain and loss of sensation in extremities), cardiovascular disease, kidney problems, eye problems, and many others.
BUT WAIT !!!
THERE’S HOPE !!!


A healthy diet, regular exercise, and medication when indicated can help control levels of glucose in the bloodstream. In fact, the sooner you take charge, the better off you’ll be.

Follow Mike on Instagram @Mike.Natter

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