The final day of the Democratic National Convention will bring Hillary Clinton fully into the spotlight when she addresses the Wells Fargo Center crowd tonight. In a program mostly devoid of other political star power, she will be the unquestioned main attraction. Here's what to look for:

A balancing act: Clinton has benefitted from some strong warm-up acts: President Obama, Bill Clinton, Vice President Biden and Michelle Obama have all hailed her work and tried to round out her profile, and have painted a far sunnier, more positive picture of America than we heard at the GOP convention last week. The stage is set. But Clinton has a balancing act -- she'll want to contrast Donald Trump's dire vision, but also will need to acknowledge the great anxiety and concern so many Americans feel. Can she pull it off?

Star power? The highest praise for Clinton has cast her as a caring, dedicated woman who uses technocratic skill to help people in need. But no one has described her as a thrilling campaigner. She doesn't have the magnetism of the big names who have preceded her this week. Will she hold her own against the barn-burning talks we've heard so far? Clinton has been at her best when delivering her speeches in a conversational style, avoiding the shouting that can undermine so many pols who act like volume equates to enthusiasm.

Last stand for the Bernie crowd? The protests seem to be tapering overall, but a resilient crowd of Bernie Sanders supporters is still making itself heard, even into last night. To some of the most hard-core Sanders backers, Clinton remains an enemy. How will they handle her big moment?

McGinty gets a shot: Along with electing Clinton, her team wants to install a Democratic senate, and that likely means helping Katie McGinty oust Pennsylvania's incumbent Republican senator, Pat Toomey. McGinty, a native Philadelphian, has been given the chance to speak to the Wells Fargo crowd. Her message, according to a draft of her remarks, will be familiar to those who have followed her campaign so far. But she'll hope to make it resonate with a larger audience.

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