Mayor Kenney is officially seeking lobbying proposals for a new contract starting in July.

A request for proposals went up Tuesday on the city's contracting website related to lobbying services in Harrisburg. Lobbyists may apply through April 26, at which point the Mayor's Office will do their vetting in selecting the city's next lobbyists in Harrisburg.

The request asks that whoever applies be ready to:

  1. Consult with city officials on the city's policy, legislative and state funding priorities and develop. and implement a lobbying strategy to assist the city in achieving its goals at the state level.

  2. Serve as a liaison between the City and the Pennsylvania General Assembly.

  3. Serve as a liaison between the City and the Governor's Office and departments and agencies of the Commonwealth.

  4. Assess the political landscape to help guide the City's lobbying strategy.

  5. Provide research, monitoring, and lobbying services to all aspects of pending legislation that impacts the city.

  6. Foster positive working relationships with members of the legislature and their staffs, and, in particular, with the members of the Philadelphia delegation

  7. Provide regular legislative reports and routine updates on strategies planned and activities undertaken to the Mayor's Office.

The cost of the one-year contract with option for three renewals is up for negotiation. The city is requesting that each applicant include a budget proposal and narrative for how the money would be spent. Because a lobbying contract is considered professional services, the city does not have to select the lowest bidder.

An Inquirer review of city records found that Philadelphia taxpayers paid private lobbyists in Harrisburg and Washington D.C. $482,924 last year - nearly enough pay for three members of Congress.

The city's federal lobbying contracts also expire June 30. The Kenney administration does not yet have a timeline for when it will seek lobbyists for the nation's capital, city spokesman Mike Dunn said.

"Because issues related to the work of the General Assembly and Governor have such an important impact on the City and its residents, the Administration has prioritized those lobbying services first," Dunn said.

To apply for the lobbying contract, visit the city's eContract website.

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