There's no place like local for the holidays. Here are some artisanal gift and craft ideas that will make you and yours merry.

Soothing salve. Winter weather is murder on the skin, so Janet Curtis, owner of Jahaya's Organic Skin Care, has a selection of soothing products featuring a shea butter base - a perfect stocking stuffer for dry-skin sufferers. To buy: Refresh Me Collagen Facial Mist, $10; Cool Citrus Basil Shea Butter, $15; Pumpkin Masque, $15; at Jahaya's, 7201 Germantown Ave., 215-247-8226.

- Elizabeth Wellington

In Fasch-ion. If you still haven't heard of Johann Friedrich Fasch, you're missing Philadelphia's excellent baroque orchestra Tempesta di Mare, which just put out Fasch Orchestral Works, Volume 3. Only in recent years has this contemporary of J.S. Bach been revived, thanks partly to Tempesta's Richard Stone and Gwyn Roberts, who not only play the music but also reconstruct fragmentary manuscripts. Whether or not the music is a revelation, it's always pleasant. To buy: $20, www.tempestadimare.org/shop.

- David Patrick Stearns

Into the Bolivian depths. The Philadelphia Renaissance band Piffaro came out of a quirky 2010 residency in Bolivia with renewed interest in how Spanish-imported music of the 16th and 17th centuries mutated in the New World and mingled with the indigenous culture. With composers such as Cristobal de Morales, the group's latest disc, Los Ministriles in the New World, is bound to be ethereal, though in this incarnation, its surroundings are unexpectedly earthy. To buy: $14.99. Amazon.com.

- David Patrick Stearns

New kinds of heaven. Based in Chestnut Hill, The Crossing choir has been premiering works for years, many of which are heard on the group's first solo disc, titled It Is Time. The music invariably reflects founder Donald Nally's provocative taste in the poetry of Paul Celan and Philip Levine, but the highlight is Philadelphia composer Kile Smith's probing setting of Celan in "Where flames a word." Other pieces are by Paul Fowler, David Shapiro, and Erhard Karkoschka.

To buy: $20, www.crossingchoir.com/cart/viewitem.php?productid=2.

- David Patrick Stearns

Sniff, sniff, ahhhhh. Burning scented candles while reading a good book is a favorite winter pastime of mine. These eco-friendly soy candles made by Olivia Lotz and Jess Lee of Melo Studios in Ardmore are sure to do the trick. The candles, which come in vintage containers, are made from 100 percent soy wax, and scents include pine, lemon verbena, lavender, and bergamot spice. To buy: $18, Juju Salon and Organics, 713 S. Fourth St., 215-238-6080. Information: www.melostudios.com.

- Elizabeth Wellington

Mad for letterpress. As a designer at the Wayne-based studio Two Paper Dolls, Christine McMahon shows her Mad Men love with a stationery set of blank-inside cards printed by hand on an antique letterpress. Each features a Mad Men character and quotation. Her favorite is Peggy Olson, who says: "A pretty face comes along and everything goes out the window." To buy: $17 for a pack of eight with coordinating envelopes, at twopaperdolls.com or twopaperdollsshop.etsy.com.

- Cathy Rubin

The season's cutest plant. Sinningia 'Lil Georgie' tops out at 1 inch tall and 11/2 inches wide, making it one of the smallest flowering plants ever, says Gary K. Hunter, longtime wholesale specialty-plant grower in Drumore, southern Lancaster County. This new "micro-mini" hybrid is a steady bloomer, perfect for miniature and fairy gardens, terrariums, or open pots. To buy: $12.99 at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, which also sells Hunter's Sinningia 'Prudence Risley' ($12.99) and Poinsettia 'Ruby Frost' ($14.99). His website is garysspecialtyplants.com, but he does not have a retail outlet or online sales.

- Virginia A. Smith

Poetry to share. Elaine Terranova, a much-beloved local poet and teacher at Community College of Philadelphia, gives us Dames Rocket, a lovely book of poems about hope and life, where there is "always, an open door, / a fence of mirrors reflecting dawn." Penstroke Press. 76 pp. To buy: $15, at Amazon and local bookstores.

- John Timpane

Scoop this up. This collection of handcrafted cherrywood utensils has evolved over 30 years of experimentation in the Kempton, Pa., woodshop and kitchen of Julia and Jonathan Simons. These can serve anything, from soup to spaghetti, pudding to pie; they can spread, scoop, strain, whisk, ladle, grab, cut, peel, paddle, or pour. Use them at the stove or on the table. To buy: $8 to $38, Portfolio at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 128 N. Broad St., 215-972-2075.

- Cathy Rubin

A charmer of a cookbook. Elizabeth Gilbert wasn't expecting much when she came upon her great-grandmother's cookbook while unpacking boxes in the Frenchtown home where she settled after her world travels for Eat, Pray, Love. But she found such an endearing and witty portrait of the Philadelphia woman who wrote a cooking column from the 1920s through World War II that she had to share it with the world. The result: At Home on the Range, by Margaret Yardley Potter. To buy: $24, at bookstores and online. Proceeds from this book benefit ScholarMatch (scholarmatch.org).

- Maureen Fitzgerald

Pretty Peggy's plot. Benedict Arnold's name has become synonymous with treason in the American mind, but his wife, the beautiful Peggy Shippen of Philadelphia, has largely escaped blame. Until now. Journalist Mark Jacob and lawyer Stephen H. Case argue in Treacherous Beauty: Peggy Shippen, The Woman Behind Benedict Arnold's Plot to Betray America (Lyons Press) that Mrs. Arnold was up to her elegant neck in her husband's scheme to sell out to the British during the Revolutionary War. To buy: $24.95, available at local bookstores or online.

- Michael D. Schaffer

Drink to this. If you don't believe Pennsylvania can make decent wine, Fort Washington's year-old Karamoor is the latest winery that could change your mind. A few of the Bordeaux-style blends are still too big and young. But this lush and ready 2008 cabernet franc, with notes of raspberry, bell pepper, milk chocolate, and anise, is already making restaurant lists from Vetri to Savona, Del Frisco's, and Jake's. Pennsylvanians can also mail-order direct from the winery. To buy: $27 per bottle ($21.60 by the case), www.karamoorwines.com.

- Craig LaBan

Remember this? This classic, matching-tiles game from Lafayette Hill-based Fresh Artists features artwork by Philadelphia public school students. Proceeds from the five editions - including ones showcasing iconic Philadelphia buildings and Barnes Foundation masterpieces - go toward funding art supplies and programs in underfunded schools. To buy: $24, at Anthropologie stores.

- Cathy Rubin

A wheel wild time. While traffic roars above them on an I-95 overpass in South Philly, skateboarders flash through a wild concrete world of ramps and obstacles they've built for themselves. In FDR Skatepark: A Visual History (Schiffer Publishing), longtime skateboarders Nicholas Orso, Phil Jackson, and Scott Kmiec have compiled more than 100 photos that take readers under the bridge. To buy: $34.99, available at local bookstores or online.

- Joelle Farrell

Head over heels. Angelique Buckley, mother of one (soon to be two), opened her Etsy shop last fall after she was inundated with requests for the same items she was making for her newborn, Ben. The fleece giraffe hat - one of her best-sellers - is designed and sewn at her house in Phoenixville. For newborn to adult, the hat has a snap closure on the chin strap; Velcro available upon request. To buy: $22, mrsptb.etsy.com.

- Cathy Rubin

Bold and bright accessories. Designer Yumnah Najah, who launched her jewelry line at 17, describes her self-named collection of hand-painted creations as diverse, simple statement pieces. Her Midnight Skies earrings - bright, beaded, and dangling - are for women who want to stand out. To buy: $36, yumnahnajah.com.

- Layla Jones

In the can. Local blogger Marisa McClellan captured the zeitgeist on her popular canning blog "Food in Jars," with inventive recipes and gorgeous photos for everything from jams and pickles to ketchup and salsa. Here is a collection of her recipes, Food in Jars, Preserving in Small Batches Year Round, printed on paper between two hardcovers. To buy: $23, at local bookstores and online.

- Maureen Fitzgerald 
 

The organic manicure. We've taken a shine to the notion of a nontoxic manicure. Philadelphia's JuJu Salon & Organics uses nail polishes without four chemical no-nos: phthalates, formaldehyde, toluene, and acetone. To buy: regular manicures, $22; the spa version, $32. For information:www.jujusalon.com/salon_about.php.

- Inga Saffron

Long and dreamy. If you like to mix and match, scavenge in secondhand stores, and show off an eclectic style, these long pendant necklaces by joeyfivecents are your thing. Bucks County's Susan Forker creates an old, dream-weaver look for every piece. To buy: $45, thelittleapplestore.com.

- Anna Pan

Crystal clear. These blazing purple and orange amethyst necklaces are rough-cut and plated in gold. No two are the same, so your girlfriend needn't worry she'll see someone else wearing one at the next holiday party. The artist, Chelsea Pearce, was born and raised in South Philadelphia five blocks from her vintage boutique, Moon & Arrow, 727 S. Fourth St. To buy: $32, canoecrafts.etsy.com.

- Anna Pan

Grab a Benjamin and delight one and all with eco-friendly pillow covers, Philly-sewn plaid shirts, Chester County-bred meats, one-of-a-kind slippers.

Pillow talk. Chanee Vijay saw many a bright pillow in her shopping endeavors, but she couldn't find something in the neutral color palette she loved - let alone anything eco-friendly and washable. So she decided to make her own. The result: {me}longings, her collection of hand-pulled, screen-printed pillow covers. Working from the fourth floor of her Society Hill rowhouse, Vijay uses sturdy and sustainable organic hemp with metallic, nontoxic inks for practical and beautiful home decor.To buy: $65 for 12-by-21-inch pillows, $70 for 20-by-20, at melongings.com. 

- Cathy Rubin

Now that's a centerpiece. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has a slew of unusual tabletop gardens and terrariums for sale this holiday season. The plants are grown at PHS' Meadowbrook Farm in Abington; the pots are made locally. To buy: $35 to $70 at Meadowbrook Farm, 1633 Washington Lane, Meadowbrook. They'll also be available at the PHS Holiday Pop Up Store at 8232 Germantown Ave. in Chestnut Hill beginning Wednesday. Information: 215-887-5900 orwww.meadowbrookfarm.org.

- Virginia A. Smith

Toasty toesies. Josie Marsh of Kennett Square crafts her warm slippers from cast-off wool sweaters and leather apparel, resulting in unique patterns in 14 adult sizes. The former Gore engineer started making the felted, nonslip slippers when her daughter, Azie, was 1, and then opened her Etsy store with a couple of pairs four years ago. The orders are rolling in. To buy: $64 to $80 for adult-size slippers; $36 for toddler booties, woolybaby.etsy.com.

- Cathy Rubin

Four seasons of beauty. This shot of the Swan Pond is one of 100 photographs in the 2012 book Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill Pennsylvania Through the Lens of Paul W. Meyer, director since 1991. To buy: Both book ($39.95) and unframed prints of any of its photos are available from the arboretum, 100 E. Northwestern Ave. A 20-by-30-inch print is $95; 12-by-18-inch, $40. Twenty of Meyer's photos are on display in the gift shop. Information: 215-247-5777 or morrisarboretum.org.

- Virginia A. Smith

Button up, buttercup. These Luxe Life plaid flannel shirts are for the Gen Xer who is mature enough for a classic plaid button-up, but cherishes retro headphones, turntables, and boom boxes. They come in three color options: red and black, olive, and navy blue, and are designed by DJ Nigel Richards for his Philadelphia-based menswear label, 611. The shirts are sewn right here in Philly.

To buy: $76, www.611lifestyle.com, or 267-603-3611.

- Elizabeth Wellington

Down on the farm. Wyebrook Farm is ex-bond trader Dean Carlson's post-Omnivore's Dilemma dream come true, an idyllic Chester County property where he raises heritage-breed cows, pigs, and chickens sustainably. Taste this meat sampler of grass-fed steaks, pork chops, eggs, and cured meats (pastrami! bacon!) and see why chefs rave. Butchering is done on the premises, and nothing is frozen - a perfect gift for active cooks. To buy: $75 for seven pounds in a thermal bag,info@wyebrookfarm.com for pickup at farm (150 Wyebrook Rd., Honey Brook, 610-942-7481), or in Philadelphia at Green Aisle Grocery (1618 E. Passyunk Ave.) or Cook (253 S. 20th St.).

- Craig LaBan

Greens and blues are the colors I choose. Deborah Williams' pottery, created on her property in Willingboro and inspired by the garden and water, is often embellished with relief and sculptural elements; tiny frogs rest on the edges of her bowls. The color variations of greens, blues, and tans are achieved by the melting and pooling of molten glaze on the textured surface. To buy: $36 to $125; Portfolio at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 128 N. Broad St., 215-972-2075

- Cathy Rubin

$200 and under

Tighten that belt. Dress up any monochromatic cold-weather look this winter with a color-blocked leather belt by Kaitlyn Doherty, one of the designers-in-residence this year at Macy's Philadelphia Fashion incubator, where goods are conceived and fashioned in Center City. To buy: $125, www.kaitlyn-elizabeth.com

- Elizabeth Wellington

Hometown blues. Art in the Age has applied the small-batch, artisanal approach to what may be the ultimate global product: blue jeans. The Old City store commissioned the Fishtown-based Norman Porter workshop to produce a line of handmade men's jeans. Each pair is crafted from Japanese raw selvage denim and stitched into a classic fit with yellow-orange thread. The jeans come in sizes 28 to 36. To buy: $200 to $240, www.artintheage.com

- Inga Saffron

It's a tiebreaker. Don't settle for a boring tie from a chain store when you can choose from an array of vibrant silk-screened designs created by Philadelphia Fashion incubator participant Melissa D'Agostino in her Philadelphia studio. To buy: $85-$125, www.melissadagostino.com

- Elizabeth Wellington

In full swing. Husband and wife team Margaux and Walter Kent of Fishtown take old things and make them new. Here, a tree swing made of reclaimed old-growth pine that was once a floor joist in a 19th-century house. The seat is finished with natural tung oil and measures 32 by 7.5 inches with 24 inches of sitting room. It attaches to two sides of 25 feet of rope; instructions are included on how to secure the whole thing to a tree branch. Let the fun begin. To buy: $180 at pegandawlbuilt.com. Each swing is made to order and may take up to two weeks to ship.

- Cathy Rubin

Too pretty for Cheerios. This wooden bowl was fashioned from a Japanese pagoda tree at Tyler Arboretum by Haverford College grad Tom Pleatman, who uses only trees felled by storms and other natural causes. Many come from the region's public gardens. To buy: $150, at Tyler, 515 Painter Rd., Media (610-566-9134 or tylerarboretum.org); and at treasuredwood.com.

- Virginia A. Smith

It cuts both ways. John Brandt-Lee built websites before he became a chef and restaurateur. Now he has taken to the branding iron and lathe to make these handsome cutting boards, already prominently featured in his eateries, West Chester's Avalon and Avalon Pasta Bistro in Downingtown. Made from sustainable Pennsylvania hickory, walnut, or cherry, no two boards are the same - except for that Liberty Bell brand of Philadelphia pride. To buy: $12 to $200, from Philadelphia Custom Block & Board, at www.blockandboard.com.

- Craig LaBan

Splurge with a bold necklace made of zippers, a made-to-order bangle, edgy rose-gold rings from Northern Liberties, pretty ceramic lamps from Kensington.

Zip it, baby. If you're in need of the perfect accessory for your little black dress, may we recommend making a statement with a zipper? Dressmaker Irina Sigal fashions her leftover silver-toothed accessories into bold necklaces. No two are alike. To buy: $245, Irina Sigal Dressmaking, 2038 Locust St., 215-772-1121.

- Elizabeth Wellington

An actually interesting lamp. Unable to find a table lamp that wasn't "hideous," Kensington-based ceramist Liz Kinder began making her own, tweaking patterns from her well-known tableware lines. She creates the bases in her studio and buys the handmade synthetic rice-paper shades from a San Francisco artisan. To buy: Short round lamps sell for $340, while tall and lean ones go for $410, at www.lizkinder.com.

- Inga Saffron

Put a ring on it. This selection of bronze-plated rose gold rings are a lovely option for the corporate lady who exudes edge. Metalsmith Angela Monaco makes all of the pieces in her Northern Liberties studio. To buy: adjustable bismuth ring, $155; tree trunk crystal growth ring, $275; small crystal creatures ring, $140; celestial eyes ring, $200; www.concretepolishstudio.com or 267-324-1396.

- Elizabeth Wellington

Curved and hollow. Here's something for those willing to splurge on a more uncommon type of bracelet: one with roots in the mythical world. This curved sterling silver bangle by Bario-Neal in South Philly looks like something elves would wear in The Lord of the Rings. The made-to-order piece needs a week of lead time for ordering. To buy: $232, bario-neal.com.

- Anna Pan

The fishin' musician. You might know him on stage as Dean Ween, co-ringleader of the Bucks-based cult band Ween. But on the water, he goes by Captain Mickey. After decades of avid angling, Mickey Melchiondo (that's him holding the fish) has turned his less melodic passion into a thriving business as a fishing guide. To buy: Delaware River striped bass in April and May, out of Trenton, $450 for two; summer bottom fishing for flounder and black sea bass out of Belmar, N.J., $650 for three. www.mickeysfishing.com.

- David Hiltbrand

Carrying serious weight. Laptop, check. Thermos, check. Yoga mat, check. Cellphone, check. Notebook, iPad, U-lock, bag of Wilbur Buds, check, check, check, check. If you're cycling to work, you need all this stuff. And Fabric Horse, the bike-centric Philadelphia design and sewing studio, now has the ultimate bag, the Ruck Sack Luxe, to stow it all in. To buy: $285, http://fabrichorse.com.

- Steven Rea

Gather 'round the pit. This is the Insignia Fire Pit, made from raw, hand-welded steel with a laser-cut nameplate of up to 15 characters. It was created by five "motorheads and car guys" from South Philly at CAVO Design, a small metal fabrication shop in Lansdowne. To buy: $898 at Terrain, 914 Baltimore Pike, Glen Mills; shopterrain.com. CAVO owner Marc Caccavo says fire pits can also be custom-ordered through CAVO at cavo-design.com.

- Virginia A. Smith

It's in the bag. This toolbox-shaped purse will put the pocketbook lover in your life ahead of the next "it" bag trend. Conrad Booker dreams up and assembles purses in his Queen Village studio. His just-in-time-for-the-holidays "Hardwear" collection features satchels made from leather and lined with fabric that incorporates pages from the New York City phone book and butterflies that Booker hand-cut from W magazine. To buy: $325, Bus Stop boutique, 727 S. Fourth St., 215-627-2357.

- Elizabeth Wellington

Riding high. From their shop in North Philly, Stephen Bilenky and his artisan cycle builders turn out some of the most beautiful, rideable bikes known to man and woman. With its lugged steel frame, 8-speed internal hub, front and rear lights, basket, and Brooks saddle, the Mixte city bike is a work of art on wheels. Pricey, but hey, we can dream. To buy: $2,995, www.bilenky.com.

- Steven Rea