Tom Zobrist and his family saw the sights, including the Liberty Bell and the Art Museum.

They dined at some fine restaurants.

But at the end of every day, they made their way to Citizens Bank Park, and that's what they'll remember most about the time they went to the World Series in Philadelphia.

"These people harassed a baby," Zobrist, the father of Tampa Bay outfielder Ben Zobrist, said before the start of Game 5 last night. "It's not all of them. But there are a small group that are obnoxious, vulgar and rude.

"We've got kids with us, including a baby, and they should not be exposed to that. I worry about their safety."

Phillies officials, including general partner David Montgomery and senior vice president of administration and operations Mike Stiles, acknowledged that there were incidents of unruly fan behavior Saturday night, especially with regard to treatment of Tampa Bay fans.

Montgomery said he spoke with Tampa Bay owner Stu Sternberg on Sunday, as well as major-league baseball security, stadium security and Philadelphia police.

Montgomery said he was "aware that some things happened during Game 3" but said that things were "much improved" Sunday night.

Stiles said the Phillies "added security" around sections where Tampa Bay families and fans were sitting, and also changed their route to the stadium exits.

"We took them down through a service area instead of a general area," Stiles said. "We believe the situation was much better [Sunday night]."

Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon, who complained Sunday about a fan tossing a mustard package at a 7-year-old family member Saturday night, confirmed the Phillies' contention that the situation was better Sunday night.

"Yeah, from the group that I got," Maddon said. "There's still some typical stuff that happens anywhere and I wasn't concerned as much about that. Like I said, throwing items at a 7-year-old is not really good behavior. So, yeah, I thought it was better.

"I know it's been well-documented in the past. I've attended events here as a fan myself. But when it strikes home at your family, then you have to say something.

"I think somebody has to make a stand at some point."

Montgomery said "passionate" Phillies' fans believe they can impact a game and sometimes get overly zealous.

"My sense is that anytime you have 46,000 people in one place, there are going to be issues," Montgomery said. "I'm a Philadelphia fan. I've been to as many sporting events in my 62 years as anybody.

"I know our fans think they can have an impact. But when it turns ugly, as hosts it's our responsibility to get them in line."

Stiles said security personnel walk a fine line because some behavior is "offensive" but not illegal.

"Fans express things," Stiles said. "It might not be illegal but it's offensive when it's directed at another group."

Tom Zobrist said his group included nine members of Ben Zobrist's family, including Ben Zobrist's 13-month-old niece, Lucy.

"She looks real threatening, doesn't she?" Zobrist said as his daughter lifted the baby into her arms.

Tom Zobrist said some family members of Tampa Bay players declined to attend Game 5 last night, preferring to remain at their hotels and watch the game on television, or leave town.

Tampa Bay public relations man Rick Vaughn declined to comment on that but indicated that he felt the situation was "much better" Sunday night.

"Saturday night was not cool," Vaughn said.

Tom Zobrist said he has been to many major-league parks while following his son's career and never experienced anything like the scene in Philadelphia.

"They're yelling at a baby," Zobrist said. "It's not all of them. We met some nice people.

"But there are some groups, they are relentless. They use foul language. They are threatening. They scream and yell obscenities at us, and all because we're wearing Tampa stuff. It's ridiculous.

"We've been to the South Side of Chicago. It was nothing like this. We've been to Boston. We've been to Yankee Stadium. This place is way ahead of Yankee Stadium."

Contact staff writer Phil Anastasia at 856-779-3223 or panastasia@phillynews.com.