WASHINGTON - A Canadian doctor who has treated golfer Tiger Woods and many other pro athletes is under a joint U.S.-Canadian investigation for possibly providing performance-enhancing drugs, a U.S. official said.

The official familiar with the investigation said Canadian authorities have been investigating Anthony Galea, who was arrested Oct. 15 in Toronto, and the FBI has been brought into the case.

The official said the investigation was being conducted by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

The New York Times first reported on the investigation. Galea's lawyer denied any wrongdoing at a news conference in Toronto yesterday.

Attorney Brian H. Greenspan said he expected Galea would face three charges in Canadian court on Friday, but said he was unaware of the FBI's involvement.

"He looks forward to being vindicated," Greenspan said. "He's a physician who has always engaged in lawful practices. He's never been involved in any improprieties, any misconduct, any unlawful conduct."

Greenspan said one charge would be for conspiracy, with the other two coming under the Food and Drug Act and the Controlled Substances Act. He did not know the specific charges.

"We can't conceive of them being anything other than minor," he said.

Mounted Police spokesman Sgt. Marc LaPorte said Galea was arrested in October after a search warrant was executed at the Institute of Sports Medicine Health and Wellness Centre near Toronto.

Greenspan said the investigation began when the doctor's assistant, who often drove around Galea, was stopped at the Canada-U.S. border. Human growth hormone and Actovegin, a drug extracted from calf's blood, were found in Galea's bag in the car, The Times reported.

Using, selling or importing Actovegin is illegal in the United States.

Greenspan said Galea has used HGH himself and prescribed it to patients over the age of 40 to improve their quality of life, but said he has never given it to athletes.