Since becoming the Inquirer's architecture critic in 1999, Inga Saffron has been just as likely to turn her eye toward Philadelphia's waterfronts and sidewalks as to the latest glittering skyscraper. She is drawn to projects of all sizes and shapes, but especially those that form the backdrop of our daily lives.

Latest Stories
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How a modern castle came to occupy the heart of Center City | Inga Saffron

The striking design of Jefferson hospital’s Scott Memorial Library is a metaphor for the activities that go on inside.

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Whole Foods cafes are falling victim to Amazon’s product-centered strategy

The grocery store's transformation is another indication that distribution centers are taking over prime retail locations.

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South Philly’s new firehouse needs to be a landmark for our times. Can a developer make it one? | Inga Saffron

Despite its wealth of great municipal architecture, Philadelphia's ambitions aren't what they once were.

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City workers turn Philadelphia’s iconic Parkway into an illegal parking lot, and others follow | Inga Saffron

“Everyone is starting to do it,” says a Philadelphia Streets Department official.

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The ‘Clothespin’ is liberated. Now can Centre Square’s renovations make us love Brutalist design? | Inga Saffron

The latest overhaul of Centre Square's lobby and atrium offers useful lessons for others trying to adapt Brutalist buildings to modern tastes.

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This great headhouse on SEPTA’s Market-Frankford Line embodies lofty architectural ambitions

The tiny Gothic building owes its survival to its location in a corner of Harrowgate Park.

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With Clay Studio’s move to North American Street, a new creative cluster emerges in South Kensington | Inga Saffron

Could an old Philadelphia industrial corridor become a new arts district? The Clay Studio is betting on it.

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Can eliminating traffic lights and adding a ‘Dutch’ roundabout fix a dangerous Philly intersection?

Just don't call it a traffic circle. The redesign of the intersection of Frankford Avenue, Trenton Avenue and York Street in Kensington is inspired by progressive Dutch engineering.

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How the smartphone explains Philly’s most profound urban design changes this decade

Gentrification, traffic congestion, and the retail apocalypse are all linked to our devices.