The spread of the coronavirus is changing life as many of us know it. One group for which that is particularly true: expectant mothers. Women across our region and throughout the country are changing delivery plans and wondering if they’re doing enough to distance themselves, to stay healthy and to keep their babies safe. The coronavirus is also shaking up the typical routines for entities across Philadelphia, as both the Philadelphia police and the Philadelphia Parking Authority announced changes to their procedures on Tuesday.

Today, the UpSide — the weekly section that highlights good news and the good in all of us — is a special PupSide 🐶. And it couldn’t come at a better time. Enjoy stories focused on man’s best friends that’ll warm your heart and lift your spirit.

Bear the Blind Pit shows off his wide smile as his owner Katie Frame gives him a few neck scratches.
GRACE DICKINSON / Staff
Bear the Blind Pit shows off his wide smile as his owner Katie Frame gives him a few neck scratches.

A car accident in Trenton forever changed the lives of a pit bull named Bear and his owner, Katie Frame. Bear lost his sight as a result of the accident. The driver who struck him fled. Bear’s owners at the time saw the extent of his injuries and left him at the animal hospital where Katie’s mom worked. The minute Katie met her new dog, she “immediately fell in love.”

Bear left the hospital without his eyes. But he emerged with a new family, a new home in Levittown, and a new Instagram account. The account has 170,000 followers and is designed to serve as a support community for people with special-needs pets. And Bear doesn’t just uplift his followers. He came to Katie at a difficult time in her life and has transformed her as much as she’s transformed him.

If you want to read more about Bear, along with some other pawesome 🐾 stories, check out the PupSide, a special edition of the Upside. Stories include:

Distancing while due is the new reality for women across the country who will soon give birth. During the already stressful time for expectant mothers, hospitals are preparing for a surge of patients sick with the new coronavirus by canceling appointments and postponing some surgeries.

Many women are being forced to change delivery plans and are filled with questions about whether they’re distancing themselves enough to stay healthy and keep their baby healthy — things baby books just don’t cover.

Dr. Wadia Mulla, director of obstetrics and maternal-fetal medicine and medical director of labor and delivery at Temple University Hospital, says women shouldn’t be concerned about space as hospitals are working to ensure enough beds for deliveries and rooms for laboring women with symptoms of COVID-19. Hospitals are working hard to keep any coronavirus patients away from others, but still, there has been an uptick in calls to providers who specialize in home births.

You can also get nightly updates on the coronavirus sent to your inbox by signing up for our free newsletter.

The impact of the coronavirus has now spread to Philadelphia Parking Authority enforcement. During the pandemic, the PPA will stop enforcing meters, kiosks, and residential time limits. But keep in mind, that doesn’t mean the agency is forgoing enforcement altogether.

When Gov. Tom Wolf directed the closure of all nonessential businesses Monday, many residents were left wondering if the PPA is “essential" — especially considering the difficulty in parking in some city neighborhoods when all residents in the area are home.

The PPA says it’s shifting its focus to emphasize safety violations such as double-parking and blocking crosswalks in an effort to make sure people can access their critical needs during this time.

That’s interesting

Through your eyes | #OurPhilly

We can certainly use all the LOVE ❤️we can get right about now. Thanks for sharing, @stoneyandersen.

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Opinions

“Our houses of worship — our sanctuaries — are ideal sites for the spread of this deadly disease. It is a horrible irony that viruses thrive in community. When we kneel together, break bread together, sing together, mourn together, celebrate together — all are opportunities for us to get sick together, too.” — Perelman School of Medicine professor Carolyn C. Cannuscio on practicing faith at home during coronavirus’ spread.

What we’re reading: Recipes 👨🏾‍🍳

As my Instagram often gives away, I consider myself an aspiring at-home chef. With all this newfound time at home, I’ve dug deep in two cookbooks in my kitchen, hoping to gain some culinary inspiration for the items in our fridge.

  • A few years ago, my fiancée and I gifted ourselves The Seasoned Life, a cookbook by Ayesha Curry. Her recipe for 🍳 prosciutto egg cups with asparagus has proven to be a great way to spice up breakfast when you have a little extra time and few ingredients.
  • At our latest housewarming, two of our best friends left us with Joanna Gaines’ Magnolia Table. As a soup fanatic, I couldn’t help but gravitate toward her recipe for 🥔 country potato soup with crumbled bacon 🥓.
  • As much as I enjoy cooking at home, I can’t help but miss my favorite Philly restaurants. If you’re itching to support the places you love, Philadelphia Magazine rounded up a long list of eateries in town that are selling gift cards to weather this uncertain time.

Your Daily Dose of | Panache

Owners Jae C. Kim and her daughter Jenny Kim pose at Kim's Clothing store in Germantown. The store is closing after being open for 40 years.
MONICA HERNDON / Staff Photographer
Owners Jae C. Kim and her daughter Jenny Kim pose at Kim's Clothing store in Germantown. The store is closing after being open for 40 years.

For 40 years, Kim’s Clothing in Germantown has been a beloved destination for menswear ranging from velvet loafers to the flashiest of suits. As they prepare to close the doors for the final time, owner Jae Choon Kim and her daughter Jenny open up about what the store meant to the community and their family.