Cory Booker’s presidential campaign has struggled to gain traction. But on Wednesday night, he went toe-to-toe with frontrunner Joe Biden on a number of issues. But was it enough to make progress in the polls? Meanwhile, a real estate start-up with big-money backing has set up shop in Philly with hopes of overhauling how people buy and sell their homes.

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Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., speaks to former Vice President Joe Biden as they participate in the second of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN Wednesday, July 31, 2019, in the Fox Theatre in Detroit.
Paul Sancya / AP
Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., speaks to former Vice President Joe Biden as they participate in the second of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN Wednesday, July 31, 2019, in the Fox Theatre in Detroit.

Unless you’re a wire-to-wire frontrunner, every presidential campaign needs its moment. Cory Booker’s campaign believes he finally had his on Wednesday night. He went toe-to-toe with Joe Biden on the debate stage, at one point telling the former vice president: “You’re dipping into the Kool-Aid and you don’t even know the flavor.”

Booker had his viral moment. Many candidates have or will. The question is whether Booker will build on this momentum after months of struggling for traction.

So, what’s next? Booker has upcoming events in Michigan, Wisconsin, and he’ll be in Philly next week. The Democratic field is expected to shrink before September’s debate and now it appears that Booker could be sticking around.

What is Compass? It’s a national, multi-billion dollar real estate brokerage that’s trying to disrupt the industry and become a one-stop-shop for buying and selling homes.

Since launching in 2012, Compass has raised more than $1.5 billion from high-profile investors. It’s also gone on a hiring spree of real estate agents, prompting a lawsuit from competitor Zillow that alleged the company poached its agents in an effort to steal intellectual property.

As of today, however, the bulk of the business is focused on improving real estate agents’ jobs through technology — leaving many observers wondering: How is Compass different for the consumer? The company, which has a headquarters in Center City, is now hoping to convince its critics the same way it has its investors.

As of Thursday, no family in the Wyoming Valley West school system owes a penny for school-lunch debts. The Northeastern Pennsylvania school district drew criticism because its attempts to get money included threatening parents with the possible placement of their children in foster care.

La Colombe co-founder and CEO Todd Carmichael offered to pay the balance for parents, but was initially shot down. On Thursday, the district changed its tune, accepting Carmichael’s offer while apologizing for the threat.

Superintendent Irvin DeRemer told parents that he did not approve the initial letter and that he was “appalled and upset” about what it said.

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Signe Wilkinson

“The fear in America’s immigrant communities has been a slow burn that arguably sparked on that June 2015 day when Trump announced his candidacy with a shot at ‘rapists’ and ‘drug dealers’ from Mexico and a mantra of ‘Build the wall!’ It only intensified with his proposed and now half-realized 'Muslim ban’ and turned bright orange when Trump and his first attorney general Jeff Sessions ‘took the shackles off’ ICE.” — Columnist Will Bunch writes that 30 months of President Trump has fundamentally changed America.

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Ben Simmons shows off the Sixers "classic" jersey modeled after a version used in 1970-71 (as well as the veins in his biceps).
Ben Simmons shows off the Sixers "classic" jersey modeled after a version used in 1970-71 (as well as the veins in his biceps).

The Sixers will have a new look on the court thanks to an alternate uniform unveiled on Thursday. The newest jersey features some 70s flair and inspiration.