Do you know who Billy Ciancaglini is? That’s part of the problem the Republican mayoral candidate says he faces as he tries to win the seat away from Democrat Jim Kenney. Whoever wins the election will be responsible for leading the city during a term that may include an economic recession, according to experts. And, already, the city is prepping for an economic downturn. But is it doing enough?

Less than a generation ago, it was hard to even give away land in this South Philly neighborhood. But, due to rapid change, a Grays Ferry community is facing internal conflict.

As values have soared, the nominal leader of a civic group that was formed to acquire and maintain some stray properties has apparently taken ownership of those properties himself. And some of his longtime neighbors aren’t happy.

Billy Ciancaglini is trying to become Philly’s first Republican mayor in decades. While his campaign messages hitting incumbent Democrat Jim Kenney might resonate, it’s going to be hard to overcome the fact that Democrats outnumber Republicans 7-1 in Philadelphia.

“The problem is there are a lot of people who don’t leave their houses to go to community meetings and have never heard of me,” he said.

A survey of economists finds a majority believing that the U.S. will enter the next recession by the end of 2021, and some even predicted that it could come sooner. State organizations are worried about how Philadelphia has been planning for a potential downturn.

For example, the state board that oversees the city’s budget is concerned that Philadelphia’s five-year spending plan didn’t account for the possibility of a significant revenue hit. The city does have a rainy-day fund, but the reserves would last only 33 days.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

Fairmount Park in the fall is the place to be. Great pic, @knicolephilly_!

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we’ll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out!

That’s Interesting

  • A 31-13 win in Buffalo shows that the Eagles have put a tumultuous month behind them.
  • The architects of an “amazing” church in West Philly built their reputations when they constructed an “elegant marble palace” in New York City.
  • The cast and crew of the new movie Harriet discuss the city’s crucial role in establishing Tubman’s legacy. Meanwhile, a local screening in Burlington County has been canceled because of a squabble with Comcast.
  • Two siblings were left to starve in a Fairmount basement in 1997. Now, the brother who survived won’t let his sister be forgotten.
  • Apparently, at the Wyck Historic House in Philadelphia, no one met a piece of paper they didn’t like — for 300 years. The American Philosophical Society has now taken control of its 100,000 documents, which, when piled up, would reach more than 15 stories high.

Opinions

“But this rally was about so much more. It was about the arrival of women in Pennsylvania’s halls of power in historic numbers. It was about making sure that the men who control the House and Senate with Republican majorities, and ranking Democratic leaders, too, understand that these new colleagues are here to be heard and not herded into an invisible corner.” — columnist Maria Panaritis writes about what happens if you call Pa.'s new female lawmakers “girlie.”

  • The Inquirer Editorial Board calls for justice for the less-famous “Meek Mills” who are caught in the probation trap.
  • Gun violence is expensive. And responding in the wrong way is costly, too, The Inquirer’s Abraham Gutman writes in his Brain Trust column.

What we’re reading

Mohanned Al-Obaidi (left) and Gin McGill-Prather at "Two Rivers: Letters from the Tigris to the Schuylkill," a storytelling event that featured Iraq war veterans and Iraqis who resettled in Philadelphia, at Burholme Park in the Northeast in August 2018.
Hussam Al-Obaidi / Warrior Writers
Mohanned Al-Obaidi (left) and Gin McGill-Prather at "Two Rivers: Letters from the Tigris to the Schuylkill," a storytelling event that featured Iraq war veterans and Iraqis who resettled in Philadelphia, at Burholme Park in the Northeast in August 2018.

Your Daily Dose of | The UpSide

A decade after leaving Iraq, refugees and veterans have found friendship in Philadelphia. “What happened [has] happened,” one Iraqi refugee said, “but what we can do is to build a friendship.”