Summer, my friends, is (un)officially over. Labor Day and Made in America have come and gone. School is back in session. And what many in Philly consider to be the true mark of fall’s arrival will happen Sunday. The Eagles are back in action, welcoming a division rival to the Linc. On paper, the Birds are one of the NFL’s most talented teams, and Carson Wentz and Co. are looking to get back to the heights they reached during their Super Bowl run two seasons ago.

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Carson Wentz is good. Like really good. Like best-QB-in-franchise-history good. And, not surprisingly, the team’s short-term future relies on his shoulders (and back, and surgically repaired knee, and all the other banged up and battered body parts that the Eagles need to make sure stay healthy).

He will lead an offense this season that might look familiar. Forget what happened in 2018. The Birds’ personnel looks like it did in 2017, when Wentz was an MVP candidate and had one of the most dangerous offenses in the league. But, defensively, there are a few more questions. Will Howie Roseman regret not cashing in on assets to bring in a star defensive end?

Either way, the Birds have a chance to be special. With the right moves, they can keep this window open for years to come.

You can check out a full season preview in our special section in today’s Inquirer. If you want to chat with three of our Eagles writers, they’ll be at our Inquiring Minds event on Thursday, Sept. 10. Get your tickets for exclusive Eagles analysis, hoagies, and more.

Nearly 10 years ago, state lawmakers ordered the Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing to create a way that would give judges the information they needed to move low-risk individuals from prison to alternative sentencing programs. Known as a risk-assessment tool, it was thought to be a way to help the state overcome a rapidly rising prison population with stark racial disparities.

Five drafts later, the commission is scheduled to finally vote on a proposal this week, despite a major issue. Critics say that the risk assessment they’ve come up with could actually increase incarceration and reinforce racial and gender biases.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

Even if we’ve all moved on, the Italian Market seems to still be in peak summer produce season. Nice shot, @localspov.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we’ll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out!

That’s Interesting

Opinions

Elementary active shooter drill
Signe Wilkinson
Elementary active shooter drill

“Had my son used at a Safehouse in Philly that day, there is no doubt that he would have survived. Statistics prove me right. He would have been 28 years old.” — Dr. Bonnie Milas, a professor at Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, writes for The Inquirer about supervised injection sites after losing her son to an overdose.

What we’re reading

  • As a millennial, I get blamed for “killing” a lot of things. Some examples: casual chain restaurants, “starter” homes, cable TV. Now, we’re being blamed for killing the Philly accent, WHYY reports.
  • Amazon’s attempt to ensure next-day delivery has “brought chaos and carnage” to America’s streets, according to BuzzFeed News.
  • NPR caught up with the “ketchup master," a man who has lived all things ketchup for more than 20 years.

Your Daily Dose of | The Best Coworkers

We got a glimpse into the lives of the working pets of Philadelphia, with cats and dogs that hang in bike shops, salons, bookstores, and beer distributors.