In the aftermath of this weekend’s mass shootings, politicians, the president, religious leaders, soccer players, and more have spoken out about gun control and the tragedies in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio. Locally in Philadelphia, many in the Latino community — a group the suspect in El Paso was linked with attacking in an online manifesto — say they feel fearful.

“As a person of color, it’s been hard over the past couple years, but as a Latina, now I feel I’m being hunted, like I literally have a target on my back,” a woman who grew up in El Paso and lives in Abington told The Inquirer.

The U.S. House has passed four pieces of gun-control legislation. But they’re all awaiting action from the Senate.

In a statement yesterday morning, President Donald Trump spoke about the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, but did not mention gun control legislation. Since 2014, the U.S. has seen a total of 1,927 mass shootings in which four or more people were killed or injured (excluding the perpetrator).

In Philadelphia, many in the Latino community reacted to the shootings with fear. The suspect in El Paso was linked to an online hate manifesto that attacked immigrants and cited a “Hispanic invasion of Texas.”

The nation and world will take note of ceremonies from Aug. 23 to Aug. 25 at the site known as Point Comfort in Virginia. It’s where the first of two ships transporting human cargo to a British colony in North America landed in late August 1619.

To commemorate the 400th anniversary, Michael Coard, a lawyer, activist and founding member of Philadelphia’s Avenging the Ancestors Coalition, is centering children as part of an Aug. 25 ceremony to highlight a particular atrocity of slavery. “Many children, especially male children, were considered such a valuable commodity that they were bred like cattle,” he said. At the same time, Coard says that children “are the future of genuine black liberation."

Coard said he insists on acknowledging the legacy of enslavement because it is important to repair the harm that’s been done.

By now you might’ve seen what Philadelphia Union captain Alejandro Bedoya did during his team’s 5-1 win over rival D.C. United on Sunday night. In case you missed it though, here’s the video of Bedoya scoring an early goal, then racing to a microphone connected to a national TV broadcast to leave a message for U.S. lawmakers in the wake of this weekend’s tragic shootings.

“Hey, Congress! Do something, now! End gun violence! Let’s go!” he yelled. The MLS won’t punish the midfielder for his action.

Bedoya, who grew up about 15 minutes from the site of last year’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, has for years been outspoken about social and political issues.

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Hate has no home here?
Signe Wilkinson
Hate has no home here?

“When things fall apart, they shatter into a million pieces. I can’t tell you yet exactly how the bloodshed in El Paso is related to a mass murder in Dayton, or to the social dysfunction right here in Philadelphia that caused someone to spray bullets into a crowd of people shooting a hip-hop video, or into a crowded block party in Brooklyn the night before that.” — Inquirer columnist Will Bunch writes about how the tragedies this weekend felt like a “Great Unraveling of America.”

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Shahad Lockhart, in red, watches as people speak about their products and businesses during a pitch competition at a youth entrepreneurship expo at the Philadelphia School District headquarters in Philadelphia, PA on Friday, Aug. 02, 2019. The students of Rebel Ventures, the youth business that's sold more than 1 million of breakfast snack cakes, hosted the expo.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
Shahad Lockhart, in red, watches as people speak about their products and businesses during a pitch competition at a youth entrepreneurship expo at the Philadelphia School District headquarters in Philadelphia, PA on Friday, Aug. 02, 2019. The students of Rebel Ventures, the youth business that's sold more than 1 million of breakfast snack cakes, hosted the expo.

Your Daily Dose of | Entrepreneurship

Young Philly entrepreneurs — some not even 10 years old — pitched their business ideas and, in some cases, dreams, for cash at a daylong event at the city’s school district HQ.