Last night, after more than three months of stand-offs, the city and activists reached an agreement to empty the homeless encampment outside the headquarters of the Philadelphia Housing Authority. In exchange for leaving, the encampment’s residents will begin a process that will eventually move them into now-vacant houses in Strawberry Mansion, my colleague Alfred Lubrano reports. As for the much larger encampment on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Mayor Jim Kenney said he hoped that last night’s agreement would “lead to a resolution.”

The story of a political outsider beating the establishment has become increasingly common in Philadelphia. And the Bangladeshi community is trying to break into the city’s insular political scene, which has long been Black and white despite a growing portion of the city not falling into either category, my colleague Juliana Feliciano Reyes reports.

Sen. Pat Toomey officially announced yesterday his decision not to run for reelection in 2022 or for Pennsylvania governor, a decision he said was personal, not political. Because of that, the Republican primaries for both that Senate seat and for governor could be the first post-2020 test for the Pennsylvania GOP. Will the GOP opt for someone who echoes Trump’s brand of politics? Or will someone more like Toomey emerge by focusing on conservative policy?

My colleague Patricia Madej spoke with experts who anticipate an uptick in traffic congestion when more people return to the workplace and activities that have been shuttered for months. Because of that, they said that now is the time to talk about potential solutions to traffic in the region.

What you need to know today

Through your eyes | #OurPhilly

These trees seem hesitant to fully embrace fall. I feel you, trees. Thanks for the pic, @tominphilly.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we’ll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout-out!

That’s interesting

Opinions

“Good things happen in Philadelphia in every minute of every hour of every day. They happen in our medical centers, universities, schools, churches, community centers, businesses, neighborhoods, homes, and through the hands, hearts, and minds of the six million people who call this metro region home.” — write Pedro A. Ramos, the president and CEO of the Philadelphia Foundation, and Kate Allison, the chair of the board of managers of the Philadelphia Foundation, write about the unprecedented philanthropy in Philly.

What we’re reading

Your Daily Dose of | Inspiration

Tom Quinn is a longtime Central High School social studies teacher who also works with Philly Youth Vote!, a group that wants to get more students registered to vote by connecting activists and teachers with each other. Quinn has been doing this for years, but he told my colleague Rita Giordano that “this is a year like no other."