How did narcotics officers find themselves in extreme danger Wednesday afternoon in what became eight hours of chaos in North Philly? At least 20 Inquirer reporters worked to piece together what happened, minute-by-minute.

Also, South Jersey residents whose homes have been ravaged by floods might have a way to get out. And the 2020 campaign staffers with Philly roots that are criss-crossing the U.S. miss their cheesesteaks, Eagles and, of course, Gritty.

Financially and emotionally exhausted by repeated flooding, South Jersey residents have been searching for options. And they might have found one.

It’s called the Blue Acres Buyout Program. The initiative by New Jersey’s Department of Environmental Protection offers to buy clusters of storm-damaged homes from residents in high-risk flooding zones. The state will buy them at “pre-storm values.”

What happens to the home once its purchased? It gets demolished.

Narcotics officers ran headfirst into a possible disaster. They just didn’t know it until it was almost too late. The Inquirer pieced together what happened the day six Philadelphia police officers were shot during a standoff that lasted hours, based on interviews with a number of local law enforcement sources and Philadelphia officials, court records, audio feeds, videos, and more.

More on the shooting:

Inquirer reporter Julia Terruso collected the names of people from the Philadelphia region who are playing major behind-the-scenes roles on 2020 presidential campaigns.

She spoke with staffers working to elect Donald Trump, Joe Biden, Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, Pete Buttigieg, and more.

What do they miss most about Philly while on the road? Their answers include Gritty, the Linc, La Colombe, and cheesesteaks.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

That’s the attitude we need on this Monday morning. Thanks for the picture, @tayylor.jpg!

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we’ll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out!

That’s Interesting

Opinions

“It’s never been fair that generations of mostly black and brown people have been viewed as dispensable, buried under the dismissive label of 'everyday’ gun violence — one I’m guilty of using in my own columns. It signals that the loss of some lives in this country is viewed as routine, expected. Normal.” — Columnist Helen Ubiñas writes about another shooting that occurred in Philadelphia last week, one that happened about ten miles from the standoff in North Philadelphia on the same day.

What we’re reading

Hussain Ali Akrami, center, is surrounded by his American famiy and three of his siblings from Afghanistan who now live in the United States, from left clockwise, Ali Sajad Bakhteyar, brother, Kevin Peter, American father, Ben Peter, American brother, Hawa Bakhteyari, sister, Husnia Akrami, sister and Nancy Peter, American mother, at the Peter family home in Mt Airy.
MICHAEL BRYANT / Staff Photographer
Hussain Ali Akrami, center, is surrounded by his American famiy and three of his siblings from Afghanistan who now live in the United States, from left clockwise, Ali Sajad Bakhteyar, brother, Kevin Peter, American father, Ben Peter, American brother, Hawa Bakhteyari, sister, Husnia Akrami, sister and Nancy Peter, American mother, at the Peter family home in Mt Airy.

A Daily Dose of | The UpSide

Growing up as an only child, Nancy Peter always wanted a big family. And thanks to an Afghan teen, she got one.