They tried, but it just wasn’t enough. After an uninspiring first half in Atlanta last night, Carson Wentz and the Eagles fired back in the fourth quarter against the Falcons, ultimately falling short and losing 24-20. Philly’s housing market, on the other hand, is still going strong, even as the threat of a recession looms. And, if you’re longing for crisp fall days as the temperature climbs past 80 degrees today, look no further than our Fall Arts Guide, where you can find the best autumnal activities, concerts, festivals and more in the Philadelphia region.

A 3-story property is being built on 1318 N. 27th Street in Brewerytown.
Brianna Spause / File Photograph
A 3-story property is being built on 1318 N. 27th Street in Brewerytown.

If you’re looking to buy a house in the Philadelphia area, don’t count on a recession to help you win a bidding war or score a deal.

In fact, over the last seven years, home prices in Philly have risen nearly 46% as the population has grown, income increased, and vacant units vanished.

And though signs suggest a national economic slowdown is coming, the strength of Philly’s local housing market puts the region in a strong position to weather a recession, experts say.

Don’t let the lingering summer weather fool you; fall and its bounty of festivals, concerts, and autumnal events have arrived in Philly. Our critics have picked the best of what’s to come in our Fall Arts Guide, so you can sit back, sip your pumpkin spice latte, and enjoy the harvest.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

Next stop: 🖤. Thanks for capturing the moment, @matthewscottbarber.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we’ll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out!

That’s Interesting

  • Financial troubles almost led to the destruction of Trinity Oxford Church, built in 1711, to make way for a Royal Farms gas station. But thanks to a grant and a vision, the historic red brick church building in Philadelphia’s Northeast section is getting a second life.
  • Twice a year, the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board pays anywhere from a couple hundred to hundreds of thousands of dollars to municipalities across the state for hosting businesses licensed to sell liquor. Here’s why.
  • Soon to be traded in for a younger, newer model, a weathered wooden utility pole on the corner of Third and Federal Streets is bidding a last “good-bye” to the neighborhood in true Philly fashion: an oddly fatalistic 150-word obituary.
  • At Sunday’s Phillies game, 15 people celebrated America’s pastime in an extra special way: by becoming U.S. citizens.

Opinions

Police Organization Chart
Signe Wilkinson
Police Organization Chart

“But it wasn’t the shooting that upended Griscom Street’s rhythm. It was the quiet that came after it. Griscom Street confronted a terrible irony: That quiet was the first peace their block had experienced in years.” - Columnist Mike Newall on the Northeast Philadelphia block that provides a window into the city’s gun violence problem.

What we’re reading

  • Tanya Covington spends every day in jury duty, and she wouldn’t want it any other way. Billy Penn profiles Philadelphia’s joke-telling “jury duty lady.”
  • On this year’s anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, a New Hampshire man tweeted a viral thread detailing the efforts of 28 search and rescue dogs who worked tirelessly through the tragedy. Buzzfeed News tells the story behind his tweets.
  • Just over 10 years ago in the heart of coal country, nearly three-fifths of the workforce was male. But as jobs in hospitals have replaced jobs in coal mines in Letcher County, Ky., the culture is changing and an increasing number of women are going to work, The New York Times reports.

Your Daily Dose of | The UpSide

Adrian Azee, 6, does cartwheels while his mom, Shyane Azee does their clothes at The Laundry Cafe August 21, 2019. The local chain of high-end Laundromats in lower-income neighborhoods - is being lauded for bringing excellent service and community commitment to areas that have long needed attractive, well-run places for residents to do their laundry.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
Adrian Azee, 6, does cartwheels while his mom, Shyane Azee does their clothes at The Laundry Cafe August 21, 2019. The local chain of high-end Laundromats in lower-income neighborhoods - is being lauded for bringing excellent service and community commitment to areas that have long needed attractive, well-run places for residents to do their laundry.

With giant flat-screen TVs, massage chairs, free WiFi, arcade games, and shelves packed with children’s books, these high-end Philadelphia laundromats are on a mission to bring loads of fun and resources to lower-income neighborhoods.