Seems as if the good people of Buffalo aren't so good after all. Buffaloans (Buffalonians? Buffaloers? Buffalites?) rolled out the red carpet when Terrell Owens signed with the Bills. Now some of them are trying to roll it back up before he gets too comfy.

Poor T.O. simply wants a home where the Buffalo Bills roam, but the house-hunting hasn't gone very well at all.

Here's what T.O. said about the situation on Twitter: "i'm happy & excited about being n B-Lo! it's jus sad that people still think [the] way they do n 2009!!"

T.O. said he was "tripping about residents" up there because they don't "want any drama [in] their neighborhood!! LOL !!!

Wow !!"

Seems that people in the tony Orchard Park section of town think Owens would be a bad neighbor, and they'd prefer if he'd just go live somewhere else. Rochester, maybe. He could commute. It's like an hour and change away. No biggie.

Owens had his eye on a sweet six-bedroom, 4,000- square-foot house listed by Realty USA for a cool $489,397, and dispatched his real estate agent to take a look at it for him.

When she returned, according to the Associated Press, she said the owners would prefer not to rent the property to Owens since he tends to cause a bit of a commotion wherever he goes. (The owners have since said they'd be "more than willing" to let Owens tour the house.)

Owens was interested in the home because a number of his new teammates live in the area.

The whole situation reeks of elitism. How can Orchard Park residents hold T.O. to such impossible standards? Buffalinos (Buffalufalers?) look at T.O. and see problems. Me? I look at T.O. and see a regular guy. Who hasn't had a bad reaction to medication and then held a news conference to explain that it wasn't a suicide attempt? We've all been there.

America has news for you, Buffalo: That's not drama, that's a little something the rest of us call "life."

"Anywhere I go, there's always a little extra added attention," Owens told the Buffalo media. "That just comes with the territory. But I don't think that anywhere I've lived that there's ever been a problem, other than one time I came to Philly. I had a little situation there.

"Other than that, it wasn't that big of a deal. And there, my neighbors, they didn't complain."

That's because people around here know Owens is misunderstood. Let he who has not done an interview with Playboy and hinted that Jeff Garcia likes men cast the first stone.

I really hope this housing situation works out for T.O. He'd be a terrible homeless person. How can you hold a hybrid driveway workout and news conference if you don't have a driveway? And if he went to a soup kitchen with his VH1 reality-show crew in tow, would everyone be allowed to eat or would the camera guys have to wait outside?

Luckily, not everyone in Orchard Park is anti-Owens. Craig and Carole McCloud live across the street from the place Owens wants. They told WBFO radio in Buffalo that they'd be thrilled to have him as a neighbor. Craig said they'd invite him over for dinner and get to know T.O. personally. And Carole, well, she's just about the most caring neighbor Owens has never met.

"I just believe that underneath everybody's exterior, whether they're famous or infamous - or not anything - that there's good there," Carole said. That's so true. The people who are "not anything" are some of the best people in the world.

"I'd try to mother him," she said. "Walk him in wisdom. I'd say, 'Terrell, let's talk about this. Let's talk about what you're doing with your life. Let's talk about it.' I want to see him be a man of destiny. I want to see him walk in his full potential - not just on the football field but off the field."

The McClouds and Owens sound positively perfect for each other. Someone needs to convene an Orchard Park community meeting and get Owens into that neighborhood. It's for the best.

Get well soon, Brian Westbrook. . . . According to Yahoo! Sports, U.S. Rep Steve Cohen (D., Tenn.) wrote a letter to NBA commissioner David Stern and to the executive director of the NBA Players Association, Billy Hunter, asking them to explain the league's minimum age of 19. "This system does far more to serve the financial interests of the universities at which the students play than the educational interests of the [students] themselves," Cohen wrote in a letter obtained by Yahoo! Sports. "I am convinced the [age rule] contributed to the recent spate of scandals involving college athletes." By the way: The district Cohen represents includes the University of Memphis, which has been under NCAA investigation for all sorts of possible infractions. That's probably just a coincidence, though. I can't imagine a politician would do something like this just to pander to his constituents or get a little publicity. . . . Just when you thought Wipeout couldn't get any better, the show forced contestants to compete in the rain. Oh Wipeout, is there no end to your devilish scheming? . . . A few days ago, the UFC officially added backyard brawler Kimbo Slice to The Ultimate Fighter reality show. Bodog.com has already set a money line on whether Slice will make the finals: plus-250 that he will, minus-350 that he won't. . . . Tomorrow is the 65th anniversary of D-Day. I plan to pay my respects by watching The Longest Day for the umpteenth time. Remember: One click should be answered by two clicks.

Contact columnist John Gonzalez at 215-854-2813 or gonzalez@phillynews.com.