The original Boston Garden is long gone, and so is the fear in opponents' eyes when they play the Celtics on their home floor.

So don't expect the Orlando Magic to be too intimidated when they arrive for Games 3 and 4 of the best-of-seven Eastern Conference final.

"We've won there before, and there's no reason we can't do it again," forward Rashard Lewis said yesterday as the Magic prepared for Game 3. "Boston came to us and beat us twice on our homecourt, so it's happened before. Why can't we do it? Why can't it happen again?"

The Celtics took the first two games in Orlando, stealing the homecourt advantage and earning a chance to advance without having to leave home again. A victory at TD Garden tonight would give them a chance to complete the sweep on Monday.

But homecourt advantage doesn't mean what it used to for Boston.

The Celtics were 24-17 at home this year - tied for the worst of all the playoff teams. It's the first time the Celtics have had a better record on the road (26-15) than at home since 1974. Boston was one of just two NBA teams this season that was better on the road than at home.

After earning the No. 4 seed in the East and quickly dispatching the Miami Heat in the first round, Boston eliminated LeBron James and the top-seeded Cleveland Cavaliers in the conference semis. Against second-seeded Orlando, the Celtics have twice opened big leads and held.

Now they're back home, where the Celtics are 5-1 in the playoffs.

"I think our guys are getting comfortable playing at home again," Boston coach Doc Rivers said.

Orlando was one of two teams - Atlanta was the other - to win twice in Boston this season. The Magic also came to town in last year's playoffs, when it beat Boston twice - including the Celtics' first-ever loss at home in a seventh game - to advance to the conference final.

"Last year, Boston never lost a Game 7 on their home floor. We went in and beat them," Lewis said. "It can happen."

Noteworthy

* Dwyane Wade testified yesterday at the trial where two ex-partners are suing him for $25 million in a failed restaurant deal, primarily explaining his relationship with best friend Marcus Andrews, who helped broker the ultimately flawed arrangement.

The Miami Heat star spent about an hour on the stand before court broke for the weekend.

The bulk of the questions to Wade involved how his agent, Chicago-based Henry Thomas, had negotiated several successful deals for him both on and off the court. But in the restaurant deal, Wade relied on Andrews to help him make certain decisions, instead of having Thomas exclusively handle the deal.

* Houston Rockets star Yao Ming is now a father. The 7-6 Yao and his wife, Ye Li, had a baby girl yesterday at a Houston hospital, team spokesman Nelson Luis said. The couple, who married in August 2007, did not announce the baby's name. She weighed 7 pounds, 6 ounces.

Chinese basketball fans were eager to learn if Yao would have the baby in America or China. Yao said in March that the birth was a "private" matter. The baby will be an American citizen since she was born in the U.S.

Yao's baby could claim Chinese citizenship as the child of Chinese nationals. However, Chinese law does not recognize dual citizenship.