Welcome to Monday, folks. Getting out of holiday mode and into work mode can be tough, but it's going to be a sunny day and the Eagles won, so the city should be perky. Before diving into today's news, enjoy this brief diversion: Prince Harry is engaged to an American.

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— Aubrey Nagle

Kareem Torain, left, and his lawyer Michael Pileggi, right. Torain was in prison for 13 years after being arrested on what he said was evidence fabricated by the narcotics squad.
Jessica Griffin
Kareem Torain, left, and his lawyer Michael Pileggi, right. Torain was in prison for 13 years after being arrested on what he said was evidence fabricated by the narcotics squad.

The city has quietly started to settle the more than 300 lawsuits against onetime members of an infamous narcotics squad accused of fabricating evidence, illegal searches, and other misconduct.

Complicating matters, six of the officers were vindicated in a 2015 criminal trial and five of them are back on the force.

How much will it cost? It could be $8 million for the narcotics cases, in addition to millions for other lawsuits alleging police misconduct — all ultimately shouldered by taxpayers.

» READ MORE: Eagles blowout Bears

The Eagles crushed the Bears yesterday 31-3, giving the Birds a 10-1 record on the season and putting them one step closer to clinching the NFC East. Despite getting sloppy with the ball, as columnist David Murphy writes, they're making a habit of big wins.

The defense didn't allow a touchdown for the second straight game and Carson Wentz threw three, inching closer to a franchise record. Zach Ertz became the Eagles' first 100-yard receiver and Alshon Jeffery led a crowd-pleasing touchdown celebration that turned his teammates into bowling pins.

Oh, and in case you missed it, former Eagles coach Chip Kelly will be the next football coach at UCLA.

On Primary Day last May, city controller of 12 years, Alan Butkovitz, was unexpectedly voted out of office, to be replaced by political novice Rebecca Rhynhart as the Democratic nominee. Rhynart went on to win the general election. What's next for Butkovitz?

He's far from officially declaring a run against Mayor Kenney in 2019, but Butkovitz has had his eyes on the mayor's office for years. He even hired consultants for a 2015 bid that never materialized.

If he does run, it won't be the first time he's faced off against Kenney. Butkovitz has been a vocal critic of the administration, especially of the soda tax. We haven't even gotten through 2018 and already a 2019 race could be shaping up. What a world.

What you need to know today

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Holiday Shopping
Dave Granlund
Holiday Shopping
"The irony is that with 'Trump awful' the bright shiny object that's impossible to ignore, 'GOP awful' is on the brink of its greatest and most diabolical victory ever." — Columnist Will Bunch writes that the Trump-centric news cycle is eclipsing a villainous GOP tax plan.

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Your Daily Dose of | Razzle-Dazzle

Karen Builione, top left, watches the holiday light show with her daughters Isabella, 7, in blue, and Francesca, 4, in pink, in Macy's.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Karen Builione, top left, watches the holiday light show with her daughters Isabella, 7, in blue, and Francesca, 4, in pink, in Macy's.

The Macy's Christmas Light Show may seem like old hat to city dwellers, but visitors continue to ooh and ahh at the dazzling show 61 years later.