Health Cents


Shopping for health insurance? Buyer beware, especially if you have cancer

Many Americans who currently have insurance may not be able to get the care they need when they get sick, and they may not even know it.

Shopping for health insurance? Buyer beware, especially if you have cancer

Many Americans who currently have insurance may not be able to get the care they need when they get sick, and they may not even know it.

Do Republicans even know what they want on health care?

Now that Republicans control both houses of Congress and the White House and have the chance to actually bring a plan to fruition, they can’t figure out what they want.

Do Republicans even know what they want on health care?

Now that Republicans control both houses of Congress and the White House and have the chance to actually bring a plan to fruition, they can’t figure out what they want.

Republicans want to throw grandma out the window

What’s the greatest threat to American health care? Republican leaders in Congress seem to think it is large numbers of America’s grandparents.

Republicans want to throw grandma out the window

What’s the greatest threat to American health care? Republican leaders in Congress seem to think it is large numbers of America’s grandparents.
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Is American health care really the most expensive in the world? It depends where you live

It’s no secret that Americans pay more for health care than anyone else in the world. We spent an average of $9,402 for each person in 2014 when all costs are considered. In Canada, the figure was just, $5,291, and in France, which was rated the best health care system in the world in 2000, it was $4,959. The average of all major countries was even lower, about $3,500.

The AHCA would devastate the most vulnerable: people with intellectual disabilities and complex medical needs

The American Health Care Act, which was passed by the House of Representatives on May 4, would have a devastating impact on the lives of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. They are some of our nation’s most vulnerable citizens.

Let’s change the debate on healthcare

The national political debate on healthcare has a singular focus on coverage for the uninsured. An emphasis only on coverage of those without insurance implies that we must spend more money to provide them with access to healthcare services.

These three kinds of patients could lose coverage under the AHCA

My goal is to highlight the Americans who are most at risk—and point you to good places to learn more.

Slash Medicaid and you jeopardize care for everyone

Just before launching his presidential campaign, Donald Trump promised that if elected, he would not cut funding for Medicaid. Chalk that up to yet another campaign promise reneged on.

Maybe the AHCA didn’t really pass the House, after all

Republicans were in such a hurry to abolish Obamacare that they voted on a repeal bill without having any clear idea of what the financial effects would be.

Who wins under the AHCA? Those who are healthy, wealthy, young and male

In the United States, it is rare to find hospitals, insurers, and consumers rallying against the same legislation. However, the House of Representatives managed to unite these disparate groups when it passed legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, the law that many Americans only recently realized is one-and-the-same as “Obamacare.”

Top doctors agree: treatment, not jail, for nonviolent drug abusers

In deciding to bring back the heavy-handed “war on drugs”, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is ignoring the advice of the 148,000 physician and medical student members of the American College of Physicians.

Republicans think they know how to regulate health care as thoroughly as Democrats

The failure of the House Republican proposal to repeal and replace Obamacare has turned the attention of Republican members of the Senate to devising an alternative that captures their somewhat more moderate preferences but still sticks to Republican promises to repeal the objectionable parts of the ACA.

The ACA lives on, but key parts still face danger

With the failure of the Republican plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act, the law has lived to see another day. But while individuals and families in Pennsylvania can breathe a sigh of relief, serious threats continue.

Trump’s proposed health spending cuts could wreak economic havoc

The demise of the American Health Care Act leaves the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) in place for now, but the stability of American health care is still in jeopardy. The Trump Administration has proposed a budget that severely cuts health, education and research spending, which has the potential to seriously impact hospitals and the communities they serve. Let’s take a moment to understand the many benefits—tangible and intangible—these health care organizations provide.

What happened to the idea of preserving Medicaid for those most in need?

The proposed American Health Care Act, specifically the part that imposes per capita caps on Medicaid spending, will have a profoundly negative impact on our most vulnerable citizens, particularly those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Currently, approximately 40% of Medicaid spending goes to care for people who are disabled, including those with these conditions.

What’s in the Republican health care bill?

House Republicans released the American Health Care Act last night. For the first time, we have a strong sense of what repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act might look like if passed. We don’t yet know exactly how the bill would impact the number of people covered and the cost to the government. However, early impressions of the bill suggest fewer people will be covered.