Readers can enjoy a summer full of readings, author appearances, and related events this summer around Philadelphia. Topics range from hip-hop to boxing to poetry to math to cyber-security to good old fiction and poetry. The Free Library’s schedule is particularly vibrant right into August, and a couple of new entrants, including Shakespeare & Co. and A Novel Idea, are adding tasty literary events to the season.

Mark Kram Jr., Smokin’ Joe: The Life of Joe Frazier (7:30 p.m. June 13, Free Library of Philadelphia). A Philly story of pain, the hardest kind of work, and triumph, by the former Philadelphia Daily News sportswriter. (215-567-4341, freelibrary.org)

Mark Kram Jr., author of "Smokin' Joe: The Life of Joe Frazier."
Courtesy of Ecco Press
Mark Kram Jr., author of "Smokin' Joe: The Life of Joe Frazier."

Bloomsday (11 a.m.-8 p.m. June 16, Rosenbach Museum and Library). The Rosenbach’s daylong outdoor reading of James Joyce’s Ulysses, featuring Philadelphia celebs, plus music, food trucks, and a beer garden. (215-732-1600, rosenbach.org)

Esi Edugyan, Washington Black (7:30 p.m. June 18, Free Library of Philadelphia). The Canadian novelist’s hero is George Washington “Wash” Black, who escapes from slavery, has adventures in the Arctic and Nova Scotia, and discovers talents including art and marine biology. (215-567-4341, freelibrary.org)

Esi Edugyan, author of "Washington Black."
Left: Venturi & Karpa
Esi Edugyan, author of "Washington Black."

Elaine Welteroth, More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are (No Matter What They Say) (7:30 p.m. June 25, Free Library of Philadelphia). Former editor of Teen Vogue, this fashion and culture arbiter discusses her book — part memoir, part manifesto — on finding your way in world and workplace. (215-567-4341, freelibrary.org)

Chris Schwartz, Ruffhouse: From the Streets of Philly to the Top of the ’90s Hip-Hop Charts (7 p.m. June 26, Rittenhouse Barnes and Noble). Schwartz discusses his memoir of co-founding the influential Ruffhouse music label, with artists that included, among others, Kris Kross, the Fugees, and Cypress Hill. (215-665-0716, barnesandnoble.com)

Kate Hope Day, If, Then (6:30 p.m. June 27, Shakespeare & Co.). The Bryn Mawr alum in conversation with novelist Annie Liontas (Let Me Explain You). (215-486-2106, bluestoop.org/events)

Kate Hope Day, author of "If, Then."
Left: Boone Rodriguez
Kate Hope Day, author of "If, Then."

Jennifer Weiner, Mrs. Everything (7:30 p.m. July 9, Free Library of Philadelphia). The former Inquirer reporter reads from her latest novel, following the lives of two sisters from the 1950s to right now. (215-567-4341, freelibrary.org)

Catherine Chung, The Tenth Muse (7:30 p.m. July 11, Head House Books). Her brand-new novel features a female mathematician on the verge of solving one of the most difficult problems in all of numbers. In conversation with Jessamine Chan. (215-923-9525, headhousebooks.com)

Mary Pope Osborne, Magic Tree House: To the Future, Ben Franklin! (7:30 p.m. July 11, Free Library of Philadelphia). Her chapter-book series now takes Jack and Annie back in time to meet you-know-who. Tickets for the appearance are $13.99 (buy them online), including a copy of the book. (215-567-4341, freelibrary.org)

Richard A. Clarke and Robert K. Knake, The Fifth Domain: Defending Our Country, Our Companies, and Ourselves in the Age of Cyber Threats (7:30 p.m. July 18, Free Library of Philadelphia). Two longtime presidential cybersecurity advisers team up in this important new book. (215-567-4341, freelibrary.org)

Jason Baumann, The Stonewall Reader (7:30 p.m. July 20, Free Library of Philadelphia). Close to the 50th anniversary of the event that began the modern LGBTQ movement, Baumann shares his anthology of archival and first-person accounts. In conversation with Mark Segal, Karla Jay, and Joel Hall. (215-567-4341, freelibrary.org)

Jason Baumann, editor of "The Stonewall Reader."
Left: New York Public Library
Jason Baumann, editor of "The Stonewall Reader."

Bianca Marais, If You Want to Make God Laugh (7 p.m. July 22, Main Point Books, Wayne). The South African novelist’s follow-up to Hum If You Don’t Know the Words. (484-580-6978, mainpointbooks.com)

Harriet A. Washington, A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind (7:30 p.m. July 25, Free Library of Philadelphia). The bioethicist explores how marginalized communities often are forced to live in toxin-high environments, and how this harms the minds of those who grow up in and live in these places. (215-567-4341, freelibrary.org)

Harriet A. Washington, author of "A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind."
Yale University
Harriet A. Washington, author of "A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind."

Richard Russo and Amy Hempel (7:30 p.m. Aug. 6, Free Library of Philadelphia). Here’s a power pairing! He won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for fiction for Empire Falls, and his new one is Chances Are … . She is one of our most esteemed writers of short fiction, in collections such as her latest, Sing to It. (215-567-4341, freelibrary.org)

Richard Russo and Amy Hempel come to the Free Library on Aug. 6.
Left: Elena Seibert; Right: Vicky Topaz
Richard Russo and Amy Hempel come to the Free Library on Aug. 6.

Alfred Encarnacion and George Drew (7 p.m., Aug. 21, A Novel Idea). Two poets of national reputation. (267-764-1202, anovelideaphilly.com).