MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. — Demarcus Robinson was one of the Eagles’ 30 pre-draft visits before the 2016 draft. General manager Howie Roseman liked the Florida wide receiver, but not enough to select him before the Chiefs in the fourth round.

“The Chiefs drafted me,” Robinson said when asked about the Eagles’ then-interest, “so they must not have like me more than the Chiefs did.”

Nevertheless, the Eagles could have another opportunity to snag Robinson. He is slated to become an unrestricted free agent next month, and per NFL sources, Roseman and company have the 25-year-old receiver in their sights.

“I’m just focused on the game right now,” Robinson said Thursday at the Super Bowl when asked about free agency. “I think all of that will take place after the game and I’ll try and look at that later.”

Kansas City will likely make a play to keep their guy, but Robinson should have multiple suitors. The Chiefs also have Tyreek Hill, Sammy Watkins, and Mercole Hardman under contract for 2020. Even if Watkins, who has a large salary cap number, goes it should be hard to keep Robinson.

His statistics don’t pop off the page, but Robinson has been mired behind Hill on the depth chart. In four seasons, he has 75 catches for 949 yards and eight touchdowns. But when Hill missed four games this season with an injury, Robinson caught 16 passes for 281 yards and four touchdowns.

“We’re all pretty good guys,” Robinson said of the Chiefs’ receiver corp. “Those guys are starters right now, and that’s what the coaches label them. But we just have to roll with that.”

The Eagles will be looking to address the receiver position this offseason. While it’s unclear if either Alshon Jeffery or DeSean Jackson will return, or in Jeffery’s case, even play because of a Lisfranc foot injury, Nelson Agholor, at the least, is unlikely to return.

J.J. Arcega-Whiteside, who had a disappointing rookie season, will definitely be back.

Robinson would likely make an easy transition into the Eagles’ offense, which has many similarities to the Chiefs’ system. He plays the “X” spot, which typically goes to the fastest receiver. Robinson’s 40-yard dash time of 4.59 seconds at the combine wasn’t nearly among the best in his class, but he looks faster in pads.

He fell in the draft likely because of character concerns in college. He was suspended three times for failing drug test due to marijuana use and once for violating of team rules. But Robinson has seemingly put those troubles behind him without nary a dissenting word about his behavior in Kansas City.

He’s poised to cash in no matter how Sunday’s Super Bowl ends.

“He busted his butt all offseason,” Hill said. “He came in with the mindset that he’s not going to be denied this year. And that’s the kind of mindset you’ve got to have.”

The Brothers Kelce

Travis Kelce and brother Jason are on the surface very different. Travis is brash, flashy, and plays tight end. Jason is restrained, understated, and plays center.

“Obviously, he’s not wearing the things I’m wearing,” Travis said while pointing to his diamond stud earrings last week. “He’s got the mullet with like the side gray hairs right now. He’s turned into a dad. He’s always had that swagger to him when I don’t really care what I look like. I’m just going to be me.

“But I think we’re a little more similar than people would imagine.”

They share the same blood, after all. Jason, two years older, was first to play football, and his brother naturally followed. The same occurred when it came to choosing colleges. Both Kelces went to Cincinnati.

But the similarities extend beyond the gridiron.

“We both have the same humor in a lot of ways because we both grew up watching the same movies and playing the same games and just being around each other,” Travis Kelce said. “The competitiveness — just how we turn that switch of wanting to win in whatever we’re competing.”

They did go their separate paths when it came time to choose a winter sport. Jason stuck with blue collar hockey, while Travis went with the more glamorous basketball.

“This is where it really gets interesting,” Travis Kelce said. “It’s two different locker rooms.”

Despite their differences, the Kelces are very close. Jason, who won a Super Bowl with the Eagles two years ago, was in Kansas City when the Chiefs punched their ticket to South Florida, and he was at Hard Rock Stadium for Sunday’s game against the 49ers.

Shady inactive

LeSean McCoy was among the Chiefs’ seven inactive players for Super Bowl LIV.

The running back had anticipated that he would dress as of Monday, but coach Andy Reid sat the veteran down. Damien Williams and Darwin Thompson were the Chiefs’ only active running backs.

Williams starts and Thompson plays on special teams, unlike the 31-year-old McCoy.

Kansas City’s other inactives were quarterback Chad Henne, tackle Jackson Barton, guard Andrew Wylie, guard Ryan Hunter, linebacker Darron Lee, and cornerback Morris Claiborne.

McCoy was inactive for the AFC championship, but he said he had the flu. He dressed for the divisional playoff, but never got on the field. McCoy had been ahead of Williams in the first half of the regular season, but he suffered a concussion mid-season and eventually lost his job.

Reid drafted McCoy with the Eagles. They spent four seasons together in Philly before being reunited this season. McCoy, who still intends on playing next season, told The Inquirer Monday that he wants to eventually retire as an Eagle.

Former Eagles receiver Jordan Matthews, to no surprise, was among the 49ers’ inactives. He joined quarterback B.J. Beathard, receiver Dante Pettis, cornerback Dontae Johnson, tight end Daniel Helm, linebacker Azeez Al-Shaair, and defensive lineman Kevin Givens.