Haddonfield Schools Superintendent Lawrence Mussoline plans to step down at the end of the school year, ending a two-year tenure as chief.

Mussoline informed the school board Thursday night that he plans to resign effective June 30. He was hired in June 2018 by the Camden County district after retiring from the Downingtown school system. No reason was given for the resignation, and Mussoline could not be reached for comment Friday.

In this file photo, former Downingtown School Superintendent Lawrence Mussoline (left) and Mayor Josh Maxwell (right) greet Gov. Tom Wolf. Mussoline announced Thursday that he will step down in June as schools chief in Haddonfield.
In this file photo, former Downingtown School Superintendent Lawrence Mussoline (left) and Mayor Josh Maxwell (right) greet Gov. Tom Wolf. Mussoline announced Thursday that he will step down in June as schools chief in Haddonfield.

He took over the district during a turbulent period. Haddonfield made national headlines in May 2018 after the high school boys’ lacrosse season was canceled because a white player used a racial slur against a black female track runner who was visiting from another school. Then interim Superindent David Lindenmuth suspended the team, igniting furor among some parents and players. He resigned a month later.

Civil rights officials said the incident was part of a disturbing culture in Haddonfield, a predominantly white borough of nearly 12,000 residents. The Camden County chapter of the NAACP agreed to provide diversity training and workshops.

In a statement, Board President Adam Sangillo said Mussoline “grabbed the reins of a district in need of major rebuilding and clear leadership.” He said Mussoline had “righted the ship" and credited him with leading long-range strategic planning and promoting diversity, updating curriculum and increasing technology.

“He has accomplished a great deal in a very short time,” Sangillo said.

Mussoline was given a five-year contract with a $174,689-a-year salary. Haddonfield enrolls about 2,500 students and is one of the top-performing districts in New Jersey.

Sangillo said the board is working on a plan to name a successor.