10:20 PM - July 1, 2020
10:20 PM - July 1, 2020

Cape May County issues ‘urgent request’ for people to wear masks

Cape May County and municipal leaders on Wednesday issued an “urgent request for universal mask-wearing” for people in public places with some “very limited exceptions.”

The county board of chosen freeholders, the county chamber board of directors, and the mayors of all 16 county municipalities joined in the statement to ask all residents and visitors to wear masks.

County Freeholder Will Morey said: “We’re in a position right now to contain the mild outbreak of COVID that our county is experiencing. Engaging this clear and present threat will serve to protect public health and, for businesses, may literally save the summer.”

The exceptions listed by officials include:

  • Anyone engaged in active outdoor recreation such as swimming, walking, hiking, bicycling, or running.
  • People on the beach, so long as strict social distancing is maintained.
  • When socially distanced and eating or drinking in public at a restaurant, bar, or other food or beverage establishment.
  • People who cannot medically tolerate wearing a face covering.
  • Children aged 9 or younger.

County Freeholders, Mayors, and Chamber Issue Urgent Request for Universal Mask-Wearing Throughout Cape May County Read the full statement on the County website linked below.

Posted by Cape May County Government on Wednesday, July 1, 2020

— Robert Moran

8:08 PM - July 1, 2020
8:08 PM - July 1, 2020

New Jersey now offering extended unemployment benefits

New Jersey will be providing 20 weeks of extended unemployment for workers who have exhausted state and federal jobless benefits, officials said Wednesday.

The extended unemployment compensation starts this week, the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development announced.

The extension begins after claimants exhaust up to 26 weeks of state unemployment plus 13 weeks of federal pandemic unemployment compensation.

Claimants will be automatically enrolled into extended benefits when their federal extension ends, the department said.

New Jersey can offer the extended benefits because certain federal requirements have been met, including having a high unemployment rate.

It reached 15.2% in May.

“New Jersey went from being at almost full employment last winter to double-digit unemployment almost overnight,” Labor Commissioner Robert Asaro-Angelo said in a statement. “These triggers are put in place for just such eventualities – so that claimants have access to an income safety net for an extended period of time during times of high unemployment.”

— Robert Moran

6:45 PM - July 1, 2020
6:45 PM - July 1, 2020

Rehoboth Beach now requires masks in all public places

Hot weather and clear skies brought thousands of visitors to Rehoboth Beach on Saturday, June 27, 2020. Social distancing did not appear to be followed very strictly on either the beach or boardwalk, with mask usage also not ubiquitous.
Chuck Snyder/Special to News Journal, DelawareOnline.com
Hot weather and clear skies brought thousands of visitors to Rehoboth Beach on Saturday, June 27, 2020. Social distancing did not appear to be followed very strictly on either the beach or boardwalk, with mask usage also not ubiquitous.

The city of Rehoboth Beach in Delaware is now requiring that people wear masks in all public places, including sidewalks, parks, and the beach.

The city commissioners voted unanimously on Tuesday for the strict requirement, which went into effect at 5 p.m. Wednesday and applies to anyone over the age of 12, because of an increase in local COVID-19 cases.

“The city has crowded streets and people who are not wearing masks and ignoring social distancing,” said City Manager Sharon Lynn in a statement.

“Without these precautions, the community spread is real,” Lynn said.

The mask requirement includes the city's boardwalk and all commercial establishments. The order includes bicyclists.

Face coverings are not required while a person is in the ocean, the city said.

“We cannot afford another shutdown of our city, our businesses or restaurants,” said Mayor Paul Kuhns. “So we need each individual to make responsible decisions for the sake of our entire community – wear your mask when out in public.”

— Robert Moran

5:04 PM - July 1, 2020
5:04 PM - July 1, 2020

GOP can’t force Gov. Tom Wolf to end coronavirus disaster declaration, Pa. Supreme Court rules

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf adjust his mask in West Oak Lane.
YONG KIM / Staff Photographer
Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf adjust his mask in West Oak Lane.

Pennsylvania’s GOP-controlled legislature cannot force Gov. Tom Wolf to end his coronavirus disaster declaration, the state Supreme Court ruled Wednesday, handing the Democratic governor a victory that could come into play this fall should the state see a surge that necessitates another shutdown.

In March, Wolf issued the emergency order as Pennsylvania began reporting its first COVID-19 infections. The declaration greatly expanded Wolf’s powers, allowing him to suspend regulations and control travel within a “disaster area.” At the same time, Wolf and Health Secretary Rachel Levine ordered the closure of all businesses except those deemed “life-sustaining” to slow the spread of the virus and keep hospitals from becoming overwhelmed.

From the beginning, Republican leaders in the legislature decried the closures as unfair to small businesses, and pushed to reopen sectors of the economy through legislation, which Wolf vetoed.

On June 10, Republicans and a handful of Democrats gave final approval to a resolution that leadership said would compel Wolf to terminate the disaster declaration. GOP lawmakers argued state law provides the option as a check on the executive branch, while Wolf said he’s empowered to approve or reject the resolution, as he can with legislation.

— Cynthia Fernandez

4:50 PM - July 1, 2020
4:50 PM - July 1, 2020

With more activities allowed, N.J. Gov. Murphy warns that state won’t tolerate public-health violators

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy covers his face with a face mask at the end of the coronavirus briefing in Trenton.
JOSE F. MORENO / Staff Photographer
New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy covers his face with a face mask at the end of the coronavirus briefing in Trenton.

As New Jersey prepares to reopen a swath of activities — including water parks, playgrounds, amusement parks, museums, and libraries — ahead of the July Fourth weekend, Gov. Phil Murphy cautioned Wednesday that the state won’t tolerate those who violate rules aimed at mitigating the spread of the coronavirus.

Murphy applauded officials in Jersey City, who he said began taking legal action against Factory City Restaurant and Lounge after photos and videos showed large crowds inside the restaurant last weekend.

“No one should get a pass for putting public health at risk,” Murphy said. “Even one knucklehead bar can ruin it for everyone.”

State police also cited a Livingston homeowner for a “very large gathering,” and a Bayside diner owner offering indoor dining, Superintendent Col. Pat Callahan said.

On Monday, New Jersey postponed the start of indoor dining indefinitely, as Murphy cited trends in other states as well as instances of “knucklehead behavior” at local outdoor restaurants. Outdoor gatherings are limited to under 250 people.

The governor encouraged those celebrating the Independence Day weekend to wear face masks, employ social distancing, and “use your head.”

After slowly rising over the past two weeks, the state’s rate of transmission Wednesday decreased slightly, a “positive one day sign that we need to turn into a trend,” Murphy said.

The governor praised three South Jersey counties — Atlantic, Cumberland, and Salem — that have cut their rates of transmission by at least half in the last week. Referencing increasing case numbers in other states, Murphy urged residents to exercise personal responsibility.

”We cannot live that hell again,” he said.

— Oona Goodin-Smith

4:44 PM - July 1, 2020
4:44 PM - July 1, 2020

Philly region surpasses 5,000 known coronavirus deaths

The Philadelphia region on Wednesday surpassed 5,000 reported deaths related to COVID-19, records show.

Philadelphia has the most deaths with 1,609.

Montgomery County has 800, Delaware County has 701, and Chester County has 324. Bucks had yet to update its figures as of late Wednesday afternoon, but so far the county has reported 507 deaths.

In South Jersey, Camden County has reported 464 deaths, and Gloucester County has reported 175. Burlington County did not have updated figures but most recently reported a total of 423 deaths.

— Staff Report

3:40 PM - July 1, 2020
3:40 PM - July 1, 2020

Trump backs another round of stimulus checks

President Donald Trump said he supports another round of stimulus checks for individuals as the coronavirus pandemic continues to wreak havoc on businesses across the country.

”I support it. But it has to be done properly. And I support actually larger numbers than the Democrats,” Trump said during an interview that aired on Fox Business Wednesday. “I want the money getting to people to be larger so they can spend it. I want the money to get there quickly and in a noncomplicated fashion.”

Trump to FOX Business: I support another round of stimulus done properly

On "Cavuto: Coast to Coast," FOX Business' Blake Burman detailed his interview with President Donald J. Trump, who addressed his support for another round of coronavirus stimulus and incentivizing Americans to return to work. Watch the full interview with President Trump on "The Claman Countdown," today at 3p ET on Fox Business.

Posted by Fox Business on Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Democrats have pushed for another round of direct payments up to $1,200 per person. Trump did not indicate a dollar amount or a timeline on any legislation.

Trump also suggested he is not in favor of extending the federal government’s $600-a-week boost to unemployment payments, which he called “a disincentive to work.”

”You’d make more money if you don’t go to work. That’s not what the country is all about,” Trump said.

In March, Congress approved direct payments up to $1,200 per person, and up to $500 per child. The IRS said earlier this month 159 million stimulus payments have been processed.

— Rob Tornoe

3:40 PM - July 1, 2020
3:40 PM - July 1, 2020

Philly parents, staff favor a return to schools this fall on alternate days, district survey finds

Parents pick up Chromebooks at the Philadelphia School District headquarters in Philadelphia, Pa. on Wednesday, April 22, 2020. There were reports of long lines outside the headquarters earlier in the week. Chromebooks are available for pick up through the end of the week from 9am to 4pm.
MONICA HERNDON / Staff Photographer
Parents pick up Chromebooks at the Philadelphia School District headquarters in Philadelphia, Pa. on Wednesday, April 22, 2020. There were reports of long lines outside the headquarters earlier in the week. Chromebooks are available for pick up through the end of the week from 9am to 4pm.

The best way to bring children back to school in the fall would be to have students come to buildings in shifts on alternate days, a majority of the 34,000 people surveyed about pandemic learning options by the Philadelphia School District said — though parents and teachers both say the model would create serious child-care issues on days when students don’t get face-to-face learning.

The results of the survey, released Wednesday, come as the district plans how to safely reopen in the fall despite the continued presence of COVID-19.

Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. has said that he will announce details on those plans later this month.

The survey respondents had concerns about safety precautions, what transportation will look like, provisions for special education students and whether children will be required to wear masks all day when in school.Students attending on alternate days and in staggered shifts was the preferred model of parents, teachers, students, community members and central office workers, but not by an overwhelming margin: 27% of respondents favor that option, while 22% favor everyday attendance but still with staggered arrivals and departures.

— Kristen A. Graham

3:04 PM - July 1, 2020
3:04 PM - July 1, 2020

Face masks now required in all public spaces in Pennsylvania

A man wearing a mask and gloves walks by the Independence Hall in Center City on Saturday, April 25, 2020. People out in public are urged to wear a mask due to the coronavirus outbreak.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
A man wearing a mask and gloves walks by the Independence Hall in Center City on Saturday, April 25, 2020. People out in public are urged to wear a mask due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Face masks are now mandatory in all public spaces in Pennsylvania, Gov. Tom Wolf announced Wednesday.

The new order, signed by Secretary of Health Rachel Levine, mandates that masks must be worn in public whenever anyone leaves home and can’t maintain a proper social distance from others. Wolf said the expanded order is essential in combating a recent increase in new cases in the state.

“Those hot spots can be traced to situations where Pennsylvanians were not wearing masks or practicing social distancing – two practices that must be adhered to if we want to maintain the freedoms we have in place under our reopening,” Wolf said in a statement.

Children under the age of two are exempt from the mandate, as are people who cannot wear a mask due to a medical condition.

— Rob Tornoe

2:59 PM - July 1, 2020
2:59 PM - July 1, 2020

Weekly $600 unemployment assistance ends this month, but Pa. offering programs to help

About 90 percent of Pennsylvanians who applied for unemployment since the beginning of the pandemic had received payments by early June, state officials said Wednesday. In all, Pennsylvanians have received $22 billion in assistance throughout the coronavirus shutdown, Labor & Industry Secretary Jerry Oleksiak and Department of Human Services Secretary Teresa Miller said.

As the commonwealth reopens, Oleksiak addressed business owners’ concerns about some employees opting not to return to work because they make more on unemployment. The secretary said employees can only choose not to go back to work if they are immunocompromised or have child- or elder-care issues related to the virus.

While Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation program, which provides an extra $600 a week to people on unemployment, ends later this month, Miller again reminded struggling Pennsylvanians that they can apply for other assistance programs at www.compass.state.pa.gov. Those programs include one-time payments to help with utility bills or to weather a pandemic-related loss of income.

While the federal compensation is expiring, “COV-19 is not eradicated. We don’t have a vaccine. We’re still don’t know to treat this virus, and we know cases are surging in parts of the country,” Miller said. “We want Pennsylvanians to know: No matter what happens at the federal level, they don’t have to weather this time alone.”

— Erin McCarthy

2:40 PM - July 1, 2020
2:40 PM - July 1, 2020

California’s daily coronavirus count shatters previous record set just last week

Beach goers cross Pacific Coast Highway Saturday, June 27, 2020, in Huntington Beach, Calif.
Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP
Beach goers cross Pacific Coast Highway Saturday, June 27, 2020, in Huntington Beach, Calif.

California announced 9,740 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday, a staggering one-day increase that smashes the state’s previous high of 7,149 set last week.

Overall, 232,657 Californians have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to the state’s Public Health Department. It’s second-highest total in the country behind New York, which according to Johns Hopkins University has 394,079 cases.

A surge in new coronavirus cases is hitting the West and the South particularly hard, increasing the nation’s daily case count to more than 40,000 new cases a day, well past peaks seen in April.

Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned lawmakers on Capitol Hill Tuesday the spike in new cases was putting the entire country at risk, and said he “would not be surprised” if the United States reaches a point where it is adding 100,000 new coronavirus cases a day.

— Rob Tornoe

2:00 PM - July 1, 2020
2:00 PM - July 1, 2020

Pa. reports largest one-day increase in COVID-19 cases since early June

Pennsylvania announced 636 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday, the largest one-day increase since the beginning of June, according to data provided by the state’s Department of Health.

It is the fourth time in five days the number of new cases has topped 600 in a 24-hour period, an uptick officials have said could be linked to young people drinking and gathering at bars and restaurants that have recently been allowed to reopen.

“We know when we have a problem,” Gov. Tom Wolf said in Harrisburg on Monday. “We think it’s the bars. I think in the Southeast and Philadelphia, they’re thinking it’s the same thing.”

Even as the number of daily cases increases, the average number of people in the hospital continues to decline across the state. Currently, 623 patients are hospitalized with the coronavirus in Pennsylvania, with 103 people currently on ventilators. That’s down from about 746 hospitalizations last week.

The state also reported 38 more deaths, increasing the state’s confirmed death toll to at least 6,687. Of those, 4,583 people have died in nursing homes or personal care facilities, according to officials.

— Rob Tornoe

1:30 PM - July 1, 2020
1:30 PM - July 1, 2020

Philly adds 124 new coronavirus cases, continuing daily trend

Customers of Pietro's Pizzeria dine outside in front of the boarded up Madewell store on Walnut Street in Center City Philadelphia on Tuesday, June 30, 2020.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Customers of Pietro's Pizzeria dine outside in front of the boarded up Madewell store on Walnut Street in Center City Philadelphia on Tuesday, June 30, 2020.

Philadelphia announced 124 new cases of the coronavirus Wednesday, continuing a trend of daily case counts hovering around 100.

City officials announced Tuesday that Philadelphia would not allow indoor restaurant dining or gyms to reopen Friday as planned, citing a recent rise in COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia residents. Indoor shopping malls, casinos, museums, and libraries will be permitted to open Friday, with a requirement to wear masks and a ban on eating or drinking indoors at those establishments.

But Health Commissioner Thomas Farley has also warned that the city may have to close businesses that have already opened if cases continue to rise.

The city has set a goal of around 80 cases per day, in addition to other targets, to allow all businesses permitted in the state guidance for the "green" phase to reopen.

The city reported 25 deaths due to the coronavirus Wednesday, but said the large number was due to a matching of city and state databases. A total of 1,609 Philadelphia residents have now died of COVID-19, and the city has had a total of 26,257 confirmed cases of the virus.

— Laura McCrystal

1:10 PM - July 1, 2020
1:10 PM - July 1, 2020

Where coronavirus cases are rising and falling

— Dominique DeMoe, John Duchneski

12:45 PM - July 1, 2020
12:45 PM - July 1, 2020

Made In America festival canceled in Philly

Fans listen as Juice Wrld performs during Made in America Festival on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2019.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Fans listen as Juice Wrld performs during Made in America Festival on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2019.

The Made in America festival, which has been staged on the Ben Franklin Parkway every summer since 2012, will not be happening this year. Roc Nation, Jay-Z’s management company, made the announcement on Wednesday that this year’s two-day Labor Day weekend festival is being called off.

Officially, the festival, which is co-produced with Live Nation, has been postponed and rescheduled for Sept. 5 and 6, 2021, rather than canceled.

That means fans who bought early-bird tickets for the festival this year — even though a prospective lineup was never announced — can hold onto their passes until next year. An email with a form to request a refund with be sent to all ticket buyers.

— Dan DeLuca

11:55 AM - July 1, 2020
11:55 AM - July 1, 2020

Jersey Shore mayor said changes have been made following viral video from beach bar

Sea Bright Mayor Brian Kelly is assuring residents changes have been made after a photos and a video from a packed beachside bar went viral over the weekend.

Speaking to NJ Advance Media, Kelly said the owners of Donovan’s Reef have agreed to limit capacity to 400 people at night, will no longer book musical acts, and will require all guests to wear masks.

“They obviously fell short those two nights. Many eyes are on them and they know that,” Kelly said.

The owners of Donovan’s Reef could not immediately be reached for comment.

The Monmouth County bar was far from alone when it came to bad behavior over the weekend. A widely shared picture shared on social media revealed mask-less diners crammed together over the weekend in Ventnor City.

“Even when you’re outdoors, you can’t have situations... where people are packed on top of each other,” Gov. Phil Murphy said during his daily coronavirus briefing Monday, declining to name any specific locations. “That’s not what we’re asking for. Keep your distance, and by the way, too few face coverings.”

— Rob Tornoe

10:20 AM - July 1, 2020
10:20 AM - July 1, 2020

Franklin Institute and other Philly museums announce reopening dates

The Franklin Institute will reopen to the public on Wednesday, July 8.
MONICA HERNDON / Staff Photographer
The Franklin Institute will reopen to the public on Wednesday, July 8.

Several Philadelphia museums have announced plans to reopen with new health and safety protocols in place as the city loosens coronavirus restrictions. Strict mask-wearing requirements and other health precautions in place for visitors and staff.

The opening dates are:

  • Franklin Institute: Wednesday, July 8, at 10 a.m.
  • Barnes Foundation: Saturday, July 25, at noon (member previews beginning July 23)
  • Academy of Natural Sciences: Friday, July 31, at 11 a.m. (member previews beginning July 24)
  • PAFA: Saturday, Sept. 12, at 10 a.m. (member and essential workers previews on Sept. 3)

The Eastern State Penitentiary, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rodin Museum are expected to announce late-summer reopening dates in the coming weeks.

“While these have been trying times for the entire global community, and we will continue to feel the impact of this crisis for the foreseeable future, we are eager to begin welcoming our visitors back soon to find inspiration, educational experiences and solace,” museum leaders said in a joint statement. “If our welcome can’t yet be with open arms, it will certainly be with smiles behind our masks.”

— Rob Tornoe

10:10 AM - July 1, 2020
10:10 AM - July 1, 2020

Philadelphia issues advisory for travelers from 15 states

Passengers walk through Terminal B at Philadelphia International Airport on Tuesday, June 30, 2020.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Passengers walk through Terminal B at Philadelphia International Airport on Tuesday, June 30, 2020.

Philadelphia now has a travel advisory involving 15 states where coronavirus cases are surging.

Health Commissioner Thomas Farley said on Tuesday the city is advising “that people in Philadelphia not travel to high incidence areas and that people traveling from high incidence areas coming to Philadelphia self-quarantine for 14 days.”

The advisory applies to residents returning from Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Nevada, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, or Utah.

“We’ll never be able to stop people from bringing the virus from other places into Philadelphia,” Farley said. “What we can do is try to reduce the likelihood that once people have it in Philadelphia that they spread it to others.”

The travel advisory is similar to a quarantine put in place by New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut, which also includes people returning from Idaho.

— Laura McCrystal and Rob Tornoe

9:40 AM - July 1, 2020
9:40 AM - July 1, 2020

Swarthmore College cancels fall athletics, will only invite 900 students back to campus

Swarthmore, a prestigious liberal arts college in Pennsylvania, is canceling athletics in the fall and is limiting on-campus enrollment.
Dreamstime / MCT
Swarthmore, a prestigious liberal arts college in Pennsylvania, is canceling athletics in the fall and is limiting on-campus enrollment.

To allow for single dorm rooms and social distancing, Swarthmore College said it will only invite about 900 of its 1500 students back to campus for the fall.

And while many other schools are still debating how to handle athletics, Swarthmore said it has canceled its participation in intercollegiate athletics for the fall.

Under the plan, freshmen, sophomores, and transfer students will be given the option to return to campus, president Valerie Smith said in a message to the campus.

“Ideally, all students who are able and willing to return to campus this fall would be able to do so,” Smith said in the message. “Unfortunately, in light of the measures we must take to adhere to guidance from public health experts and ensure proper physical distancing, we cannot pursue that option at Swarthmore.”

The decision takes into account the capacity for single dorm rooms, the ratio of students to bathrooms in residence halls, space in the dining hall, cleaning protocols and the need to reserve some space for quarantine, the school said.

Students who choose to live off campus will not have access to college facilities, Smith said.

If conditions do not improve by the spring, junior and seniors will be given the preference to return to campus, she said.

Most classes will be taught remotely, even to students are on campus, Smith said. The term will start on time, with no fall break, and end its on-campus portion before Thanksgiving, the same plan as just about every other college in the region.

The college also said it will not force any faculty member to teach in-person classes or any student to return.

Swarthmore also will launch a January term, which will allow students to take a course over several weeks. That way, they can take three courses as opposed to four in the fall.

Swarthmore also said it will cancel a planned tuition hike. Tuition will remain $54,256. For students who live on campus, total costs will be $71,310. And in a new move, student tuition will include a $700 textbook allowance, the school said.

— Susan Snyder

8:00 AM - July 1, 2020
8:00 AM - July 1, 2020

Malls, museums, and libraries can reopen in Philly on Friday

Philadelphia police on bikes roll east on Filbert Street by the Fashion District.
ELIZABETH ROBERTSON / Staff Photographer
Philadelphia police on bikes roll east on Filbert Street by the Fashion District.

Indoor shopping malls, casinos, museums, and libraries in the city will be allowed to open Friday, with strict mask-wearing requirements and other health precautions in place, Health Commissioner Thomas Farley announced Tuesday. No eating or drinking will be permitted inside.

Indoor dining won’t resume and gyms won’t open in Philadelphia this week, and further reopenings will be on hold until Aug. 1, Farley said, but the city will reevaluate progress weekly.

The number of new U.S. infections has increased by 80% over the last two weeks, according to data collected by the New York Times, including sharp increases in the South and West.

Farley said he remained concerned about the impact that a national surge in cases could have on Philadelphia. “I want the businesses to reopen as much as anybody,” he said, “but at the same time I think officials in Florida and Texas are regretting it right now, and I don’t want us to be there in the future.”

— Justine McDaniel and Laura McCrystal

7:30 AM - July 1, 2020
7:30 AM - July 1, 2020

Philly health official points to shared houses at the Shore and social gatherings as cases rise

Daily case counts in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania have begun slowly rising, rather than falling, over the last week. In interviews with the city, many newly infected people said they had recently shared houses at the Shore or socialized at bars or restaurants, according to Health Commissioner Thomas Farley.

Earlier in June, the city had reached a steady average of 100 new cases per day; 142 were reported Tuesday. A number of them were teens who reported traveling to the Jersey Shore and socializing, Farley said.

Based on contact tracing, the recent uptick in cases appeared to be tied to social gatherings. Farley said he believed that if the protests following the death of George Floyd had caused an increase in cases, it would have occurred earlier.

Unlike its surrounding counties, which are following state guidance for what activities and businesses can resume under the governor’s “green” phase of reopening, Philadelphia has taken a more restrictive approach, imposing its own rules. Further reopening will be on hold until Aug. 1, and the city will assess its progress weekly, officials said.

— Justine McDaniel and Laura McCrystal

7:00 AM - July 1, 2020
7:00 AM - July 1, 2020

Which Atlantic City casinos will open Thursday

The boardwalk in Atlantic City looking south towards Maryland Ave and Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City, NJ on Tuesday, June 23, 2020.
ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ / Staff Photographer
The boardwalk in Atlantic City looking south towards Maryland Ave and Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City, NJ on Tuesday, June 23, 2020.

Casinos are allowed to reopen in New Jersey on Thursday, though there are capacity restrictions and guests won’t be allowed to drink or eat food inside. Smoking will also be banned indoors due to face mask requirements.

Here is when Atlantic City’s nine casinos plan to reopen to the public:

  • Bally’s: Will open Friday, July 3, at 10 a.m.
  • Borgata: Will remain closed
  • Caesars: Will open Friday, July 3, at 10 a.m.
  • Golden Nugget: Will open Thursday, July 2, at 6:01 a.m.
  • Hard Rock: Will open Thursday, July 2
  • Harrah’s: Will open Friday, July 3, at 10 a.m.
  • Ocean: Will open Thursday, July 2, at 8 a.m.
  • Resorts: Will open Thursday, July 2
  • Tropicana: Will open Thursday, July 2, at 8 a.m.

— Rob Tornoe