7:06 PM - July 29, 2020
7:06 PM - July 29, 2020

Youth sports teams in Montco quarantined after players test positive for COVID-19

An unspecified number of youth sports teams in Montgomery County have been quarantined because players tested positive for COVID-19 after participating in games, Montgomery County Commissioner Dr. Val Arkoosh said in a briefing Wednesday.

“Because social distancing couldn’t be maintained, entire teams have now been quarantined for 14 days,” said Arkoosh, chair of the Board of Commissioners.

Arkoosh said the infected participants came from teams playing outdoor sports, including baseball, football, soccer, lacrosse, and field hockey, as well as indoor basketball.

The majority of positive cases did not exhibit symptoms while playing, but did so within one to three days afterward. She did not provide further information about the teams or players.

Arkoosh emphasized the importance of everyone practicing social distancing.

— Robert Moran

6:06 PM - July 29, 2020
6:06 PM - July 29, 2020

Phillies visiting clubhouse employee tests positive

A member of the Phillies visiting clubhouse staff tested positive for the coronavirus this week, general manager Matt Klentak said Wednesday, but all tests for players and on-field staff came back negative on Monday and Tuesday.

The tests were conducted to determine if the virus spread during the Phillies’ three games with the Marlins, who remain isolated at their Center City hotel and have had 16 players and two coaches test positive in recent days for COVID-19.

— Matt Breen

5:22 PM - July 29, 2020
5:22 PM - July 29, 2020

U.S. tops 150,000 deaths because of COVID-19

The Charioteer of Delphi bronze cast is decorated with a cloth mask on Kelly Drive outside of the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Monday, May 4, 2020.
MONICA HERNDON / Staff Photographer
The Charioteer of Delphi bronze cast is decorated with a cloth mask on Kelly Drive outside of the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Monday, May 4, 2020.

The United States has recorded more than 150,000 deaths because of the coronavirus pandemic, Johns Hopkins University reported Wednesday.

The global tally was more than 662,000, according to the university’s tracking website.

The next highest country was Brazil with 88,539 deaths, followed by the United Kingdom with 46,046 and Mexico with 44,876.

Canada has recorded 8,959 deaths.

China, where the virus was first reported, has tallied 4,658 deaths.

— Robert Moran

4:50 PM - July 29, 2020
4:50 PM - July 29, 2020

N.J. proposed legislation would require all-remote learning

Cherry Hill Public Schools employees distribute Chromebook computers for students to use while schools are closed at the Malberg Administration Building in Cherry Hill in March.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Cherry Hill Public Schools employees distribute Chromebook computers for students to use while schools are closed at the Malberg Administration Building in Cherry Hill in March.

Three New Jersey Democratic lawmakers said Wednesday they plan to introduce legislation that would require public schools to reopen for the upcoming school year with remote instruction only and keep buildings closed.

The proposed bill contradicts guidelines issued by Gov. Phil Murphy and the state Department of Education directing New Jersey’s nearly 600 public schools to offer some in-person learning along with an option for parents to choose all virtual instruction.

Murphy, during a virtual briefing Wednesday, declined comment on the pending legislation. He has said that in-person learning is the best option for all students and that some parents in poor districts are unable to hire tutors, purchase devices for remote instruction, or designate space in their homes for remote learning.

“There’s a strong chorus on both sides of this,” Murphy said. “There’s no one size fits all here.”

Assemblywomen Pamela Lampitt, (D., Camden) Mila Jasey, (D., Essex) and Joann Downey, (D Monmouth) citing health and safety concerns, said they plan to introduce the proposed bill Thursday.

”In-person learning, without a doubt, produces the best educational outcome for students and we are all eager to return to the classroom. However, until we can ensure the safety of our students and school staff, we must focus our efforts on how we can enhance remote and virtual learning to provide students with the highest quality education possible,” Lampitt, chairman of the Assembly Education Committee said in a statement.

The proposed bill calls for starting the school year with online learning only. Starting Oct. 31, state health and education officials would evaluate whether buildings should reopen.

The measure would give districts the option to delay the start of the school year by two weeks. It would also let schools hold outdoor events at the start of the year so students and teachers could get acquainted.

— Melanie Burney

4:32 PM - July 29, 2020
4:32 PM - July 29, 2020

Eagles’ Lane Johnson tests positive for coronavirus

Eagles’ Lane Johnson cools off after the Eagles training camp in Philadelphia, PA on July 30, 2019.
DAVID MAIALETTI / Staff Photographer
Eagles’ Lane Johnson cools off after the Eagles training camp in Philadelphia, PA on July 30, 2019.

Eagles offensive tackle Lane Johnson tested positive for coronavirus and was placed on the Reserve/COVID-19 list Wednesday.

The Pro Bowl lineman issued a statement on Twitter with the news of his positive test, saying he feels “strong and ready to go.”

Johnson attended the OL Masterminds Summit, his annual clinic for NFL lineman in Dallas, earlier this month. According to media reports, roughly 50 players were scheduled to attend the clinic.

“Over the past few months, I have tested negative after all travels including before and after the OL Masterminds Summit — 18 days ago,” Johnson said on Twitter.

“I have been working hard in preparation for a long, grueling season and have tried to take all the necessary precautions to build a safe and healthy environment during the sessions. I have and will continue to this seriously and encourage everyone else to do so as well,” he said.

— EJ Smith

4:16 PM - July 29, 2020
4:16 PM - July 29, 2020

PIAA votes to proceed with fall high school sports

#32 Joshua Barlow of St. Joes Prep barrels down the field with #11 Malachi Bowman of Central Dauphin attached and #3 Nick Chimienti in close pursuit St. Joseph's Prep plays Central Dauphin in the PIAA Class 6A State Football Championship in Hershey, Pa on Saturday December 7, 2019
Bob Williams For The inquirer
#32 Joshua Barlow of St. Joes Prep barrels down the field with #11 Malachi Bowman of Central Dauphin attached and #3 Nick Chimienti in close pursuit St. Joseph's Prep plays Central Dauphin in the PIAA Class 6A State Football Championship in Hershey, Pa on Saturday December 7, 2019

The Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association board of directors voted unanimously on Wednesday to proceed with fall high school sports, EasternPAFootball.com reported.

“The PIAA Board of Directors has voted unanimously to continue with plans for fall high school sports. August 10th with football heat acclimatization,” the website tweeted after the vote.

The PIAA announced earlier this month that it was planning for the “normal start of the fall sports season unless otherwise directed by the Commonwealth.”

That means that football teams can begin official workouts on Aug. 10, and the other fall sports can start up on Aug. 17.

— Staff Reports

3:21 PM - July 29, 2020
3:21 PM - July 29, 2020

Philly will hire 120 temporary workers for trash pick-up as big delays drag on

Sanitation workers Rashan Purcell, left, and Lawrence Brown, right, collect trash on East Allegheny. Ave., in Philadelphia July 27, 2020.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Sanitation workers Rashan Purcell, left, and Lawrence Brown, right, collect trash on East Allegheny. Ave., in Philadelphia July 27, 2020.

The Philadelphia Streets Department will hire 120 temporary sanitation workers to address widespread delays in trash pick-ups during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a plan Mayor Jim Kenney’s administration presented to City Council on Wednesday.

But the delays won’t end immediately: Hiring is expected to take about four weeks, according to a slideshow detailing the plan that Streets Commissioner Carlton Williams shared with Council members.

In the meantime, the department will “continue to use other departmental staff to assist until temporary employees are hired,” according to the slideshow, which was obtained by The Inquirer.

The delays have been caused by sanitation workers calling out sick in large numbers while residential trash loads increase due to more people staying home.

— Sean Collins Walsh

3:05 PM - July 29, 2020
3:05 PM - July 29, 2020

Fauci outlines five things people can do to prevent coronavirus surges

Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, said during an MSNBC interview Wednesday there are five things people can do to stop coronavirus surges in their states:

  • Wear a mask when leaving the house
  • Avoid crowds and large gatherings
  • Maintain social distancing of at least six feet
  • Wash hands as often as possible with soap
  • Avoid bars

Fauci said it’s important for leaders and individuals in states where cases have begun to increase to get ahead of the curve to avoid large outbreaks, like those taking place in states like California, Florida, and Texas.

“What we’re seeing now is what actually took place a couple of weeks ago. And what we’re going to see a couple of weeks from now, is what we’re doing now,” Fauci said. “If we don’t start initiating rather strict adherence to the five principles I just mentioned, what inevitably is going to happen is that the states that are not yet in trouble will likely get into trouble.”

— Rob Tornoe

2:05 PM - July 29, 2020
2:05 PM - July 29, 2020

Philly promises public school students will have internet access as coronavirus keeps classes online

Philadelphia School District Superintendent William R. Hite Jr.
MONICA HERNDON / Staff Photographer
Philadelphia School District Superintendent William R. Hite Jr.

Every Philadelphia School District student will have the tools to access digital learning in September, Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said Wednesday, pledging to connect the thousands of families who lacked Internet access this spring when schools first went remote.

“Every student that needs it will have it,” Hite said.

He said the city, district officials, and internet service providers are now hammering out details, which he hopes to announce soon.

Fleshing out the district’s back-to-school plan, which will have students attend school fully virtually at least through November 17, Hite said that parts of school buildings, as well as city recreation centers and libraries, would likely be opened up to provide childcare for families who need it. Childcare details, including capacity at such locations, remain unclear.

The superintendent also said that while teachers will not be expected back in buildings, those who want to teach from schools will likely be given the green-light to do so.

— Kristen A. Graham

1:50 PM - July 29, 2020
1:50 PM - July 29, 2020

15 Rutgers football players test positive, remain in quarantine

Rutgers football coach Greg Schiano speaks at a news conference in Piscataway, N.J., in December.
Seth Wenig / AP
Rutgers football coach Greg Schiano speaks at a news conference in Piscataway, N.J., in December.

Fifteen football players from Rutgers University have now tested positive for COVID-19, New Jersey health commissioner Judy Persichilli said, one of several outbreaks officials cited in what Gov. Phil Murphy described as a “worrisome” pattern of community clusters.

Rutgers announced last week it was quarantining the team following six positive test results.

In addition to a Cape May County party in late June that led to 46 cases, Persichilli said that 55 cases have now been traced to a recent house party in the northern part of the state. On Sunday, a house party in Jackson, Ocean County, drew more than 700 people, state officials said. Another weekend party in Long Beach Island has sidelined about three dozen lifeguards from Harvey Cedars and Surf City.

For first 3 weeks of July, people who are 18 to 29 made up 24 to 33% of the state’s cases, Persichilli said, compared with 12% in April and 22% in June.

— Allison Steele

1:25 PM - July 29, 2020
1:25 PM - July 29, 2020

Growing number of New Jersey cases linked to house parties

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy speaks during a coronavirus press briefing at Trenton War Memorial in Trenton, N.J. on May 26, 2020.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy speaks during a coronavirus press briefing at Trenton War Memorial in Trenton, N.J. on May 26, 2020.

Over the last four days, New Jersey added a total of about 2,000 new COVID-19 cases, which Gov. Phil Murphy said set the state back to where it was a month ago in terms of progress. The transmission rate remains just over one, meaning at least one person is being infected as a result of each new case.

Murphy said a growing number of cases are being traced to house parties, a “worrisome” trend that has led to dozens of infections in recent days.

“I get it. We get it. We’ve all had our routines turned upside down for the past four months and we want to blow off some steam with friends,” said Murphy, who also acknowledged that the heat was likely driving people into enclosed, air-conditioned spaces with less ventilation.

“Folks, we simply cannot continue to have crowded house parties. They are not safe, period,” he said. “They are how coronavirus gets passed around more efficiently. They put the hard work we’ve all undertaken together since March at risk of being undone.”

When many people crowd into an indoor, air-conditioned space, Murphy said, “you have also invited coronavirus to your party.”

“Yes, it’s hot. Yes, it’s summer. Yes, we all want to blow off some steam,” Murphy said. But this is no time for anyone to be vying for induction into the knucklehead hall of fame.”

And he suggested that as the state continues to lose ground in terms of new cases, it could further delay the return of indoor dining.

“I’m not gonna say that indoor dining is like a house party, because it isn’t,” he said. “But when one party in an air-conditioned house leads to dozens of new cases, it should give us all pause.”

— Allison Steele

1:13 PM - July 29, 2020
1:13 PM - July 29, 2020

More than 30,000 Philly residents have now tested positive for coronavirus

Christine Volpe wears a mask and a face shield as she participates in the Philly chapter of Live Events Coalition gathered to call attention to the hardships people in their industry face because of COVID-19 closures, in Philadelphia, July 24, 2020.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Christine Volpe wears a mask and a face shield as she participates in the Philly chapter of Live Events Coalition gathered to call attention to the hardships people in their industry face because of COVID-19 closures, in Philadelphia, July 24, 2020.

More than 30,000 Philadelphia residents have now tested positive for COVID-19 since March, when the virus began spreading in the city.

The city announced 132 new cases of the coronavirus Wednesday, bringing the total number of cases of the virus to 30,077. City officials also announced two deaths; a total of 1,680 residents have now died of the coronavirus.

Health Commissioner Thomas Farley warned at a news conference Tuesday that the virus was "likely to be worse before it gets better," as he announced that new cases were increasing in the city. In the past week, he said, the city had an average of 164 new cases of COVID-19 per day.

— Laura McCrystal

12:30 PM - July 29, 2020
12:30 PM - July 29, 2020

All Phillies players test negative for coronavirus, Marlins remain in quarantine in Philly

Bryce Harper and J.T. Realmuto celebrate at the dugout during the Phillies game against the Miami Marlins on July 25, 2020.
ELIZABETH ROBERTSON / Staff Photographer
Bryce Harper and J.T. Realmuto celebrate at the dugout during the Phillies game against the Miami Marlins on July 25, 2020.

For a second consecutive day, Phillies players and coaches didn’t test positive for COVID-19, two sources confirmed Wednesday, after an outbreak over the weekend in Philadelphia involving the visiting Miami Marlins.

More than half of the Marlins' 33-player traveling party has been infected with the virus since last Friday. The team remained under quarantine at a Center City hotel again Tuesday night and continued to await word on travel plans.

Major League Baseball officials believe the coronavirus contagion is limited to the Marlins. Just in case and because the incubation period for the virus can last between two days and two weeks the Phillies were tested on back-to-back days Monday and Tuesday. MLB teams have undergone alternate-day testing since training camp began four weeks ago.

It's not known whether the Phillies will continue to be tested daily throughout the week, as manager Joe Girardi speculated in an MLB Network Radio interview Tuesday.

MLB postponed four Phillies games this week against the New York Yankees “out of an abundance of caution,” according to a news release Tuesday. Friday’s Phillies game against the Toronto Blue Jays has also been postponed until Saturday, when the two teams will now play a doubleheader at Citizens Bank Park.

After not having access to ballpark facilities for the last two days, the Phillies were hoping to resume a workout schedule Wednesday, with players reporting to the field at staggered times to limit their interactions.

The Athletic reported that another Marlins player tested positive Tuesday, bringing the total number to 16 players and two coaches who have been infected. It remains unclear why the Marlins were allowed to play Sunday’s game against the Phillies after several positive tests had already been reported.

— Scott Lauber

12:30 PM - July 29, 2020
12:30 PM - July 29, 2020

Pennsylvania reports 834 new cases on Wednesday

Pennsylvania reported 834 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday, and is averaging 975 cases a day over the past seven days, according to an Inquirer analysis.

Delaware County, which has experienced a sharp increase in cases since the end of June, reported 63 new cases Wednesday, according to state Department of Health. The seven-day average number of new daily cases in Delaware County climbed from about 16 near the end of June to about 75 in the last week, according to state data analyzed by The Inquirer.

The Department of Health said 161,894 coronavirus tests were administered between July 22 and July 28, with 6,619 positive cases — a positive test rate of about 4.1%.

At least 7,162 Pennsylvania residents have now died after contracting coronavirus, with 16 new deaths reported Monday Of the state’s deaths, 4,883 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities.

— Rob Tornoe

11:30 AM - July 29, 2020
11:30 AM - July 29, 2020

Latest on school reopenings in and around Philly

William Hite, superintendent of the School District of Philadelphia, tours the cafeteria of Benjamin Franklin High School and the Science Leadership Academy back in February.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
William Hite, superintendent of the School District of Philadelphia, tours the cafeteria of Benjamin Franklin High School and the Science Leadership Academy back in February.
  • Philadelphia School District: Students will not return to the classroom until November at the earliest, after plans for a hybrid model of in-person and online instruction sparked fierce opposition.
  • Archdiocese of Philadelphia: Most elementary school students will return to buildings five days a week, and high school students will begin the year with a hybrid digital and in-person approach.
  • Camden: Preliminary plan is to reopen schools in September with a hybrid model that allows parents to choose some in-person learning or all-remote instruction for their children.
  • Philadelphia suburbs: Some districts are delaying in-person instruction. Norristown Area School District students won’t attend in-person at least through January, while Downingtown Area School District students will learn remotely through at least Nov. 5. The superintendent of the Cheltenham School District is recommending a “full virtual mode” for all students during the fall semester.
  • New Jersey: Gov. Phil Murphy said any resident can opt for their children to learn remotely, but is pushing for schools to reopen to at least some students in the fall.
  • Delaware: Gov. John Carney said the state will likely recommend school districts begin the year with a mix of remote and in-person learning, with an emphasis on getting elementary students back in the classroom in September.

— Rob Tornoe and Kristen A. Graham

10:55 AM - July 29, 2020
10:55 AM - July 29, 2020

Philly has no plans to enforce mask requirement

A SEPTA bus that reads, "Philly never backs down, mask up," passes the Rittenhouse Hotel on Monday, July 27, 2020.
MONICA HERNDON / Staff Photographer
A SEPTA bus that reads, "Philly never backs down, mask up," passes the Rittenhouse Hotel on Monday, July 27, 2020.

Health Commissioner Thomas Farley said Tuesday a “large majority” of Philadelphia residents are wearing masks in public and in stores. The city has a media campaign to encourage mask use, he said, but there are no plans to enforce the requirement.

“I do think we do pretty well with masks,” Farley said. “We need to do better still. But I don’t think we’re going to solve that problem by trying to arrest people for not wearing masks.”

Farley said recent cases of COVID-19 appear to be spread among friends and family at social gatherings, so Philadelphia residents also need to focus on wearing masks when around their loved ones.

Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware all require that people wear masks in public — both indoors and outside — when it is difficult to maintain a proper social distance from others.

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf has said it would be almost impossible to enforce the state’s mask mandate, even as many business owners in the state say doing so would help them police face coverings in their stores.

“What is going on is the same thing that happened with seatbelts,” Wolf said at a press conference last week. “People recognize they got to do it. It doesn’t matter what I say, it doesn’t matter what she says, it matters what the virus is going to do. And that virus really doesn’t like it when you wear a mask.”

In Delaware, Gov. John Carney warned Tuesday that a revision to the state’s executive order mandating masks might be required to allow the state hold people accountable when they refuse.

“Our objective is not to close down businesses — it’s to open them up and to allow them to stay open, and stay open safely,” Carney said. “We would encourage you to help by wearing a face mask and practice social distancing.”

— Laura McCrystal and Rob Tornoe

10:00 AM - July 29, 2020
10:00 AM - July 29, 2020

Lawmakers discussing short-term extension of $600 unemployment payments, Treasury secretary says

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks with reporters about the coronavirus relief package negotiations, at the White House, Thursday, July 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Evan Vucci / AP
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks with reporters about the coronavirus relief package negotiations, at the White House, Thursday, July 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Democrats and Republican don’t appear to be close to a deal for an economic stimulus package amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Speaking to reporters outside the White House Wednesday morning, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the two sides are “very far apart,” but said they are discussing extending the federal $600 unemployment benefit, which expires at the end of this week.

“We ought to work on the evictions, so that people don’t get evicted. You work on the [unemployment] payments to the people. And the rest of it we’re so far apart we don’t care. We really don’t care,” President Donald Trump told reporters.

Democrats and Republican agree on sending individuals another round of $1,200 stimulus checks. But Republicans propose cutting the federal aid to unemployment payments by $1,600 a month, down to $200 a week. Democrats passed a bill in May that kept the added unemployment benefit at $600 a week.

Trump also defended including nearly $2 billion for a new FBI building in the Republican coronavirus relief bill, which Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) said should be removed.

“You need a new building. It’s a bad building, it’s a dangerous building.” Trump said. “it’s not a very good building from the inside.”

— Rob Tornoe

8:00 AM - July 29, 2020
8:00 AM - July 29, 2020

Coronavirus makes a comeback around the world

A restaurant employee wearing a protective face mask to help curb the spread of the coronavirus offers a joss stick on a huge incense burner in the Asakusa district in Tokyo on Monday.
Eugene Hoshiko / AP
A restaurant employee wearing a protective face mask to help curb the spread of the coronavirus offers a joss stick on a huge incense burner in the Asakusa district in Tokyo on Monday.

An unforeseen summer surge of coronavirus cases in countries that had seemingly quelled their outbreaks is helping to drive the unrelenting growth of the global pandemic, undercutting predictions that a “second wave” would not occur until the fall.

Japan, Israel, Lebanon and Hong Kong are among dozens of places reporting record numbers of new cases in recent days, many weeks after they had crushed the curve of infections, reopened their economies and moved on.

And in some countries that had brought numbers down, notably in Europe, the reopening of borders, bars and nightclubs is being blamed for a small but noticeable increase in cases.

In Belgium and Spain, the number of daily infections has surpassed levels not seen since early May, prompting authorities to reimpose some recently lifted restrictions. Since the beginning of July, the number of new cases in Japan has climbed by more than 60 percent, a growth rate equivalent to the United States', alarming a country that had trumpeted the “Japanese model” for containing the virus.

— Washington Post

7:40 AM - July 29, 2020
7:40 AM - July 29, 2020

Cases continue to climb in the Philly and the suburbs

An unidentified man places his face mask on before entering the Fashion District in Philadelphia, Pa. Tuesday, July 28, 2020. Masks are mandatory in all pubic places in Philadelphia.
JOSE F. MORENO / Staff Photographer
An unidentified man places his face mask on before entering the Fashion District in Philadelphia, Pa. Tuesday, July 28, 2020. Masks are mandatory in all pubic places in Philadelphia.

New daily case numbers and averages keep rising in Philadelphia and its four neighboring counties, in many cases making a fairly steady climb in July, state data shows. That means progress made in May and June in flattening the curve of infections appears to be eroding.

Two weeks ago, Philadelphia’s weekly average of new cases per day was 111; in the last week, the average reached 164 and will likely increase after delayed reports come in, Health Commissioner Thomas Farley said. The positivity rate reported Tuesday was about 5.2%.

The city has not yet seen an increase in people admitted to hospitals with the virus, Farley said, but there has been an uptick in the number of people coming into city emergency rooms with fevers and coughs — a sign of increased spread of the virus.

Daily case reports were also rising in all four of the collar counties, particularly Delaware County, where the seven-day average number of new daily cases climbed from about 16 near the end of June to about 75 in the last week, according to state data analyzed by The Inquirer.

— Justine McDaniel, Laura McCrystal and Erin McCarthy

7:20 AM - July 29, 2020
7:20 AM - July 29, 2020

More than 6,300 coronavirus cases linked to U.S. colleges, at least 167 at Penn

A University of Pennsylvania student wheels a hamper filled with her dorm contents when the university suspended classes back in March due to the coronavirus pandemic.
MICHAEL BRYANT / Staff Photographer
A University of Pennsylvania student wheels a hamper filled with her dorm contents when the university suspended classes back in March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

More than 6,300 coronavirus cases have been linked to 270 U.S. colleges since the start of the pandemic, according to surveying done by the New York Times. And that’s before most schools have begun their fall semester.

There have been at least 167 cases among undergraduate, graduate, and professional students at the University of Pennsylvania since March, the school reported on its website. According to the Times’ data, Penn is just one of 11 schools nationwide reporting more than 100 cases. Penn plans to bring students back to campus in the fall using a mix of online and in-person classes.

According to the Times’ data, Temple University and West Chester University reported just one case each. Drexel, Penn State, and Villanova did not respond to the Times.

A separate Times survey of 130 universities that compete in Division I football uncovered over 630 cases on 68 campuses among athletes, coaches, and other employees.

— Rob Tornoe

7:00 AM - July 29, 2020
7:00 AM - July 29, 2020

Wednesday morning round-up