7:00 AM - June 2, 2020
7:00 AM - June 2, 2020

Go to Tuesday’s live blog for the latest updates

A South Philadelphia gunstore owner shot and killed a potential burglar early Tuesday morning amid a third night of protests and unrest following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Follow the latest updates from Tuesday here:

11:59 PM - June 1, 2020
11:59 PM - June 1, 2020

Recap: National Guard troops deploy in Philly as confrontations continue between police and protesters

Hundreds of National Guard troops rolled into Philadelphia to help restore order Monday, even as new and frightening confrontations erupted between police and protesters on a third straight day of unrest.

Fires burned again, and the city remained under curfew following looting and destruction that overtook peaceful demonstrations sparked by the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police.A tired Mayor Jim Kenney declared that Philadelphia is “in the middle of one of the biggest crises in the city’s history,” simultaneously beset by civil unrest, a pandemic, economic devastation, and a primary election.

On Monday evening, thousands of marchers moved onto the Vine Street Expressway, stopping traffic on the city’s major east-west thoroughfare. Some lay in the street.Police fired tear gas into the crowd, setting off a blind, chaotic stampede as demonstrators tried to escape, scrambling up walls and steep hills and falling over one another.

“Tear gas! Tear gas!” people shouted as they ran and fell, many digging their hands into the dirt to pull themselves forward.

Read more of cour coverage from the day’s events:

11:44 PM - June 1, 2020
11:44 PM - June 1, 2020

Mayor Kenney, Commissioner Outlaw defend use of tear gas on protesters

Tear gas is fired at protestors who previously gathered on the Vine Street Expressway blocking traffic in Philadelphia.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Tear gas is fired at protestors who previously gathered on the Vine Street Expressway blocking traffic in Philadelphia.

In a statement after 11 p.m. on Monday, Mayor Jim Kenney and Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said Philadelphia Police SWAT officers had released both tear gas and non-chemical white smoke on the protest at I-676 earlier in the day.

The gas was “a means to safely diffuse a volatile and dangerous situation, and restore order,” Outlaw said in a statement. Police also used pepper spray and bean bags.

Officers had given orders for the crowd to disperse after some protesters rocked a state trooper vehicle and threw rocks at police, Outlaw said.

No evidence of rock-throwing was provided with the statement. Responding to an Inquirer request for clarification, a spokesperson for Kenney said the information about protesters throwing rocks came from firsthand accounts of high-ranking police commanders who witnessed the incident.

“Some were [hit] and one in particular remembers because he didn’t have a helmet on so he needed to duck,” spokesperson Deana Gamble said.

Protesters said they had not heard any warnings and said their protest was peaceful. Videos posted to social media had not shown violence.

Kenney added:

“I want to assure the public that this was not a decision that anyone took lightly. It was made because we simply cannot condone behaviors that endanger the lives of others, like traversing an open highway. The officers on site were concerned about the safety of protestors as well as those who may be driving on the highway.

“After issuing several warnings, they made the decision to deploy tear gas to encourage the crowd to disperse. While I regret that it came to that, and I am disturbed by the footage that I’ve seen, I support decisions made by the Department to resolve today’s activity.

“I also support activity by people like Deputy Commissioner Melvin Singleton, who was able to peacefully disperse a crowd in Center City by kneeling with them, activity that was mirrored by officers across the City, including outside the Police Administration building."

— Justine McDaniel

10:37 PM - June 1, 2020
10:37 PM - June 1, 2020

Private security armed with shotguns patrolling Italian Market

Two men in bullet-proof vests who identified themselves as private “security agents” hired by the Italian Market business community patrolled the neighborhood Monday night carrying shotguns, pepper spray, tactical knives, handcuffs, and body cameras.

“We’re private protection. It’s whatever they want, whatever they request, we get it done,” one security agent said. He declined to provide his name or the firm he worked for.

“We’re here to enforce curfew and we enforce making sure everything is safe and people are following rules and regulations,” he said.

He stood talking in front of a resident and her friend as they enjoyed drinks outside. The woman, who lived on League Street, just off 9th, sat sipping a beer at a small garden table outside her home said the agents made her feel, “not just comfortable but secure.” She declined to provide her name.

The security agent said he is licensed by the State Police.

“A lot of things we do and can do, the local police can’t do,” he said. “You don’t see police walking around with shotguns.”

At 10 p.m., a couple who lives near the area walked by with their dog. They said they felt the presence of security took them aback.

“That’s a big gun,” the woman said. “That’s a really big gun,” the man with her said. The woman said she was surprised that the Italian Market business community would be organized enough to hire private security.

— Wendy Ruderman

10:37 PM - June 1, 2020
10:37 PM - June 1, 2020

SEPTA service to resume at 6 a.m. Tuesday

SEPTA will operate scheduled service on all modes of transit on Tuesday, the agency said.

Bus, subway, and trolley service in Center City will resume at 6 a.m. Tuesday when the city’s curfew lifts.

The service has been suspended since noon on Monday.

“Delays and other adjustments are possible, so riders are urged to check for updates,” SEPTA said in a statement.

Previous modifications to SEPTA schedules because of the coronavirus pandemic are still in effect.

Justine McDaniel

10:32 PM - June 1, 2020
10:32 PM - June 1, 2020

Relative quiet in Center City

By 10 p.m. Monday, Center City was quiet — eerily so — apart from the occasional siren.

Every once in a while a police cruiser turned on its lights and sped off, but there were few pedestrians or signs of unrest — apart from boarded-up storefronts.

The National Guard continued to patrol JFK Boulevard where police cars burned and protesters rallied on Saturday.

Center City has been relatively calm since Sunday when police locked down the area from Vine to South between both rivers. The lockdown ended Monday morning.

— Maddie Hanna and Oona Goodin-Smith

10:25 PM - June 1, 2020
10:25 PM - June 1, 2020

Congressman’s district office broken into, looted

Congressman Brendan Boyle said his Philadelphia office on Girard Avenue in Yorktown was broken into and looted Monday night.

Boyle said he notified the police about the break in and was working to find out more.

He joked on Twitter that he hoped the looters were after voter registration forms.

— Julia Terruso

10:19 PM - June 1, 2020
10:19 PM - June 1, 2020

Ben Franklin Bridge open again

The Ben Franklin Bridge was reopened Monday night after being closed late in the afternoon due to police activity, the Delaware River Port Authority announced.

— Robert Moran

9:51 PM - June 1, 2020
9:51 PM - June 1, 2020

Preachers lay hands on City Hall and pray

A group of preachers gathered outside Philadelphia City Hall to pray on Monday, June 1, 2020. Police let them past the barricades to pray on the building .
Ellie Rushing / Staff
A group of preachers gathered outside Philadelphia City Hall to pray on Monday, June 1, 2020. Police let them past the barricades to pray on the building .

A group of Philadelphia preachers marched from Broad and Erie Streets down to City Hall Monday night, praying and singing together “to uplift the city’s spirits,” they said.

They stopped outside City Hall to kneel and pray before police moved the barricades around the building and allowed them to go up to the structure and continue praying. They pressed their hands against the building to pray before swaying together and signing “Hallelujah.”

“This is not a protest. This is not a riot. This is what we do. We have no other choice but to pray,” said Rev. Gregory Stinson, Jr., pastor of Davis Temple Baptist Church in North Philadelphia.

“We’ve come together just to pray to show the church is not silent and that we have come in a peaceful manner,” said Pastor Darryl Roberts of Father’s House of Prayer in North Philadelphia.

“We came out to sing some songs, uplift the city’s spirits … to pray for our city and to let the city know they have our prayers,” Roberts said.

The group left after about 15 minutes at City Hall and marched back down Broad Street to return home.

— Ellie Rushing, Oona Goodin-Smith, Tom Gralish

9:34 PM - June 1, 2020
9:34 PM - June 1, 2020

Neighborhood clash in Fishtown ends with at least one hurt

A group, who called themselves old-time Fishtowners, walk west on Girard Avenue carrying bats, hammers and shovels in Philadelphia, Pa. on June 1, 2020. The men said they believed they were protecting their neighborhood in the event looters or rioters showed up in Fishtown.
DAVID MAIALETTI / Staff Photographer
A group, who called themselves old-time Fishtowners, walk west on Girard Avenue carrying bats, hammers and shovels in Philadelphia, Pa. on June 1, 2020. The men said they believed they were protecting their neighborhood in the event looters or rioters showed up in Fishtown.

A neighborhood stand-off between a group of mostly men, armed with bats, and other residents and protesters, has largely dispersed after dozens of police arrived alongside a SWAT vehicle.

Tensions flared in Fishtown around 7 p.m. when a group of men armed with bats, hammers and shovels, who said they were there to defend businesses from looters, started arguing with neighbors lined up across Girard Avenue.

Police and SWAT teams asked the group of about 200 to disperse at least four times before most people, including the group carrying weapons, dispersed.

Some protesters remained and engaged with a line of officers standing in the middle of Girard Avenue.

“Why were others teargassed for peacefully protesting but they could walk around with bats and be protected?” one woman asked.

After SWAT arrived and officers told the protesters they were receiving their third and final warning to disperse, the crowd dissipated shortly after 9.

WHYY radio producer Jon Ehrens was hurt while covering the encounter. In a tweet, he said he was beaten up by one of the armed men after taking video of the group. He later posted an update saying, “Im fine. On my way to the hospital but I’m ok. Thanks for the concerns.”

— Julia Terruso and Anna Orso

9:23 PM - June 1, 2020
9:23 PM - June 1, 2020

Joe Biden to speak in Philadelphia Tuesday

Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden holds his notes as he speaks to members of the clergy and community leaders at Bethel AME Church in Wilmington, Del., Monday.
Andrew Harnik / AP
Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden holds his notes as he speaks to members of the clergy and community leaders at Bethel AME Church in Wilmington, Del., Monday.

Joe Biden will visit Philadelphia Tuesday to speak about the protests and violence convulsing the country, his campaign announced Monday night.

Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee for president, will speak on “the civil unrest facing communities across America” his campaign said. It did not provide further details.

The event will be Biden’s first outside of Delaware, and only his fourth stop outside his home since the coronavirus pandemic halted campaigning in March.

Biden’s address will come a day after President Donald Trump delivered a speech from the Rose Garden of the White threatening to deploy the military to crush violent protests and “dominate the streets” if governors don’t act with more force. He labeled violence and looting “acts of domestic terror.”

Biden has struck a far different tone since the protests began rippling across the country. He visited protests in Wilmington, Del., Sunday and met with African American leaders in the city Monday, promising to address institutional racism in his first 100 days in office and expressing sympathy for those protesting police brutality.

“Hate just hides. It doesn’t go away, and when you have somebody in power who breathes oxygen into the hate under the rocks, it comes out from under the rocks,” Biden said Monday.

— Jonathan Tamari

9:05 PM - June 1, 2020
9:05 PM - June 1, 2020

I-676 reopens to traffic

I-676 has reopened to traffic, after protesters took over the highway Monday afternoon and were dispersed when authorities fired tear gas, leading to a chaotic stampede as the demonstrators tried to flee.

8:22 PM - June 1, 2020
8:22 PM - June 1, 2020

National Guard blocking access to 69th Street in Upper Darby

The National Guard in Upper Darby on Monday, June 1, 2020, a day after looting on the 69th Street corridor.
Maddie Hanna / Staff
The National Guard in Upper Darby on Monday, June 1, 2020, a day after looting on the 69th Street corridor.

The National Guard was blocking access Monday evening to 69th Street in Upper Darby, the site of widespread looting the night before.

Between Market and Walnut Streets, members of the Guard were stationed at intersections around 8:15 p.m., holding guns and standing in front of armored trucks. One said he and other Guard members weren’t authorized to speak with a reporter, including on how long they’d been there, but said they had been blocking both pedestrians and cars from entering the corridor.

— Maddie Hanna

8:13 PM - June 1, 2020
8:13 PM - June 1, 2020

Police take a knee with protesters, easing tension outside police headquarters

Outside police headquarters, several police officers and national guardsman took a knee earlier this evening with protesters as the assembled crowd erupted in cheers and applause.

The harmonious moment at the Roundhouse at 8th and Race Streets came after some tension as a swelling crowd of protesters neared the line of police and guardsman standing in front of the building.

National Guard vehicles started rolling out around 7:30 p.m. By 8 p.m. only a heavy police presence remained and protesters had dispersed.

— Pranshu Verma and Julia Terruso

8:10 PM - June 1, 2020
8:10 PM - June 1, 2020

Neighbors clash in Fishtown as some with bats and shovels say they’re defending the neighborhood

A group of 100 people, who called themselves old-time Fishtowners, gather on Girard and Berks before walking up and down Girard Avenue carrying bats, hammers and shovels in Philadelphia on Monday. The men said they believed they were protecting their neighborhood in the event looters or rioters showed up in Fishtown.
DAVID MAIALETTI / Staff Photographer
A group of 100 people, who called themselves old-time Fishtowners, gather on Girard and Berks before walking up and down Girard Avenue carrying bats, hammers and shovels in Philadelphia on Monday. The men said they believed they were protecting their neighborhood in the event looters or rioters showed up in Fishtown.

Two separate neighborhood groups clashed Monday evening after about 100 people, nearly all white males, walked on Girard Avenue carrying bats, hammers and shovels. The men said they believed they were protecting their neighborhood in the event looters or rioters showed up in Fishtown.

Tensions flared around 7 p.m. when a separate crowd of mostly younger Fishtown residents gathered across the street, begging about a dozen Philadelphia Police officers to send them home.

“Leave us alone!” one woman yelled. “We live here and they’re making us feel unsafe!”

Another man told police: “I saw hundreds of people teargassed two hours ago for walking around and these people are standing around with bats.”

The groups exchanged words about “new Fishtown” and “old Fishtown,” arguing over the soul of a neighborhood that has changed dramatically over the last two decades.

One man who appeared to be wielding a hatchet was taken into police custody. As of 8 p.m., police had lined the street and kept crowds separated.

— Anna Orso and Allison Steele

8:03 PM - June 1, 2020
8:03 PM - June 1, 2020

Route 202 remains closed as protesters march toward King of Prussia Mall

A group of protesters is marching southbound on Route 202 in Upper Merion toward the King of Prussia Mall.

KYW radio reports the crowd appears peaceful with Upper Merion Police stationed around them. On Saturday 12 people were arrested after trying to get into the King of Prussia Mall. The looters did not appear to be a part of any protests.

— Julia Terruso

7:41 PM - June 1, 2020
7:41 PM - June 1, 2020

‘Hug it out over there:’ Cops clear remaining protesters at City Hall

A tiny group of around a dozen protestors are holding a sit-in on the North side of City Hall where they are continuing their cries for justice, telling jokes and burning sage.
Pranshu Verma / Staff
A tiny group of around a dozen protestors are holding a sit-in on the North side of City Hall where they are continuing their cries for justice, telling jokes and burning sage.

With Philadelphia’s 6 p.m. curfew order in place, the scene around City Hall is relatively quiet and heavily guarded by city police and the National Guard.

A handful of protesters are being arrested for breaking curfew, while others are being told to “Go Home.”

A tiny group of around a dozen were holding a sit-in on the North side of City Hall. continuing their cries for justice, telling jokes and burning sage.

“We meet you with peace,” a protest speaker said. “But you meet us with the Army.”

Police told the sit-in protesters “you don’t move in two minutes, you’re getting locked up,” prompting them to disperse.

As they started hugging each other goodbye before disbanding for the evening, one officer urged them to move away from City Hall. “Hug it out over there,” he said.

— Pranshu Verma

7:25 PM - June 1, 2020
7:25 PM - June 1, 2020

‘It was chaotic. Like it was really like pandemonium.'

Tear gas is fired at protestors who previously gathered on the Vine Street Expressway blocking traffic in Philadelphia, June 01, 2020. Monday is the third day of protests about the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Tear gas is fired at protestors who previously gathered on the Vine Street Expressway blocking traffic in Philadelphia, June 01, 2020. Monday is the third day of protests about the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Among those who said they fled tear gas on I-676 were 22-year-old Errol Jackson and four of his friends, who said they were at the front of the crowd when police began intervening.

They fled tear gas and rubber bullets, they said, and Jackson was hit by one, he said, showing a reporter a welt on his chest.

“We all falling up the hill, trying to climb, jumping over the gate and everything, it was crazy,” said one of the young men. “It was chaotic. Like it was really like pandemonium.”

“But everyone was helping each other,” his friend added.

“The only fear was the bullets,” said another friend.

The group said the protest was peaceful and cool, with cars honking in support and protesters doing nothing but yelling and walking.

“We all came together — like as Philadelphians, everybody want to talk bad about us, but we a family,” said another.

“Brotherly love,” his friends repeated.

“This is one of the only times you get unity, from something like this,” said the first young man. “Especially when it’s black lives.”

— Ellie Rushing

7:15 PM - June 1, 2020
7:15 PM - June 1, 2020

Day after looting and tear gas, quiet in West Philadelphia

Community members make upright a kiosk that was overturned during yesterdays violence on 52nd Street today in West Philadelphia, June 01, 2020.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Community members make upright a kiosk that was overturned during yesterdays violence on 52nd Street today in West Philadelphia, June 01, 2020.

A night after protests along 52nd Street in West Philadelphia, the corridor was calm Monday.

People walked along sidewalks that had been clouded with tear gas 24 hours earlier and drove in cars past storefronts that had been smashed, now cleaned and boarded up.

Just south of Market Street, a group of a dozen or so officers and a police supervisor stood talking in front of a boarded up DTLR fashion store, which had been looted last night. Residents drifted by and teens walked by the officers without paying them much attention.

The police sergeant, supervising the officers, said that the 6 p.m. curfew is too difficult to enforce and that some residents stopped to ask the officers if it was actually in effect. The sergeant, who did not want to use his name because he wasn’t authorized to talk to the press, said he’s not going to hustle people indoors, especially if they are just coming home from work and not causing any trouble.

“You work with the community — we do that all the time,” he said around 7 p.m. “We’re just here to try and keep the peace and make sure it doesn’t get out of control,” he added. “Right now it’s safe. Let’s hope it stays that way. I think residents are sick of it. They just want everyone to calm down.”

The officers weren’t wearing helmets or masks and some leaned on metal barricade gates and scrolled through their phones.

Across the street, a 45-year-old woman waiting for a bus on her way home from work said policing had long been an issue in the area.

“We’re in a predominately black neighborhood, but all the cops are white,” the woman, who declined to give her name, said as she glanced at the group of officers. “Sometimes that can be unsettling. Even if you’re just minding your own business ... they can antagonize you.” She said police need better training, and to root out bad actors among their ranks: “This outrage is happening because the cops aren’t doing that.” She waited a few minutes longer for the bus, then started walking north.

— Maddie Hanna and Wendy Ruderman

7:06 PM - June 1, 2020
7:06 PM - June 1, 2020

Trump threatens to deploy military to end ‘riots and lawlessness’ in cities across the country

President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House, Monday, June 1, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Patrick Semansky / AP
President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House, Monday, June 1, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

President Donald Trump said he will send the military into states that refuse to curb looting and riots.

“I have strongly recommended to every governor to deploy the national guard in sufficient numbers that we dominate the streets,” Trump said in an address. “Mayors and governors must establish an overwhelming law enforcement presence until he violence has been quelled."

If a city or state refuses, Trump said he’d send in the United States military “to quickly solve the problem for them.”

Trump’s remarks came moments after police unleashed tear gas and rubber bullets on peaceful protesters gathered across Pennsylvania Avenue so the president could cross the street to visit St. John’s Episcopal Church.

President Donald Trump holds a Bible as he visits outside St. John's Church across Lafayette Park from the White House Monday, June 1, 2020, in Washington. Park of the church was set on fire during protests on Sunday night.
Patrick Semansky / AP
President Donald Trump holds a Bible as he visits outside St. John's Church across Lafayette Park from the White House Monday, June 1, 2020, in Washington. Park of the church was set on fire during protests on Sunday night.

News reports showing images of chaos in the streets, people screaming and running for cover, were interrupted by Trump’s speech.

“I was shocked at the force they used to move the protesters, who could have not been more peaceful. From their signs, there were all there to make a legitimate point about the killing of Mr. Floyd. And it was just for a photo opportunity,” New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said on CNN following the president’s remarks. “It was shameful. It was really, truly shameful.”

Trump said the measures were necessary “to protect the rights of law abiding Americans, including your Second Amendment rights.”

— Julia Terruso

6:53 PM - June 1, 2020
6:53 PM - June 1, 2020

Philadelphia will enforce a curfew Tuesday night after polls close

On Tuesday, Philadelphia will enforce a curfew beginning at 8:30 p.m., Mayor Jim Kenney’s office announced.

The curfew will give Philadelphians a chance to cast their ballots during regular voting hours. Polls for Pennsylvania’s presidential primary election close at 8 p.m.

— Sean Walsh

6:49 PM - June 1, 2020
6:49 PM - June 1, 2020

Kenney admin: Not clear which police agency fired gas on I-676

Mayor Jim Kenney’s office said it was unclear which police agency fired the gas canisters used on marchers on the Vine Street Expressway.

The mayor will not comment on the incident until the operation is over, spokesperson Deana Gamble said around 6:30 p.m.

Meanwhile, the crowd on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway had begun dispersing, but personal belongings and debris scattered the sides of I-676 where protesters had earlier scrambled to escape the area as police fired gas.

Bikes, backpacks, signs, and clothing items litter the grass slope, indicators of the chaos that ensued as a mob of people ran in a panic. State police still had the highway blocked around 6:45 p.m. and were monitoring a demonstrator who was fishing through the belongings and returning them to their owners over the fence.

— Sean Walsh, Ellie Rushing, and Kristen A. Graham

6:40 PM - June 1, 2020
6:40 PM - June 1, 2020

Protesters tear gassed near White House, moments before Trump began to speak

Moments before President Donald Trump began to deliver remarks outdoors in the Rose Garden, protesters in Lafayette Square nearby were tear gassed by police, according to reports on CNN.

The large crowd, which had been protesting peacefully, started to flee the area as thick smoke from the tear gas filled the area. When a large crowd remained, police started to push the crowds back with mounted police and rubber bullets.

— Julia Terruso

6:20 PM - June 1, 2020
6:20 PM - June 1, 2020

Watch live: President Trump to speak following days of protests

President Donald Trump announced on Twitter he will deliver “brief remarks” from the White House Monday evening at 6:30 p.m., days after violence and looting have washed through several cities across the country.

Watch Trump’s remarks live here, via Fox News:

— Rob Tornoe

6:19 PM - June 1, 2020
6:19 PM - June 1, 2020

Protester: ‘They didn’t stop tear-gassing us’

Police use tear gas to disperse protestors who descended onto the Vine Street Expressway and blocked traffic in Philadelphia, June 01, 2020. Monday is the third day of protests about the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Police use tear gas to disperse protestors who descended onto the Vine Street Expressway and blocked traffic in Philadelphia, June 01, 2020. Monday is the third day of protests about the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Protesters reported they were peacefully protesting on I-676 when police tear-gassed them, causing chaos as protesters desperately scrambled to flee and police continued releasing gas.

"All we did was walk down there. I mean, like, we blocked the traffic, but we were peaceful," said one protester, Kai Mickens of Coatesville. "We didn’t hit a car, we didn’t flip nothing, we didn’t break anything, and they tear-gassed us from up above and from in front of us."

As people tried to get off the highway, she said, "some people ran around. I myself got flipped over the fence and helped others flip over the fence, because they didn’t stop tear-gassing us. They kept going for us.

"It’s just like, how can you expect us to be peaceful and then you-- you attack us! You get mad when we violent, but when we peaceful, you still get mad, so what is the answer?" Mickens said, her voice straining with emotion. "Is there an answer?"

As she fled the expressway, she said she was “still mad. Not really scared, just — just angry.”

— Ellie Rushing

6:09 PM - June 1, 2020
6:09 PM - June 1, 2020

Councilwoman Gym to Kenney: ‘Ask militarized forces to stand down’

Tear gas is fired at protestors who previously gathered on the Vine Street Expressway blocking traffic in Philadelphia, June 01, 2020. Monday is the third day of protests about the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Tear gas is fired at protestors who previously gathered on the Vine Street Expressway blocking traffic in Philadelphia, June 01, 2020. Monday is the third day of protests about the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

After protesters were gassed on I-676, City Councilwoman Helen Gym asked Mayor Jim Kenney via Twitter to tell the police to stand down.

“Pls ask militarized forces to stand down @PhillyMayor,” Gym tweeted.

Gym noted she had blocked the Vine Street Expressway peacefully in 2000 and was “not met with this level of aggression.”

— Justine McDaniel

6:00 PM - June 1, 2020
6:00 PM - June 1, 2020

Curfew is now in effect in Philly as protests continue

A member of the National Guard rest after protesters leave the area in front of City Hall in Philadelphia, Pa. on June 1, 2020. It was the third day of protests protests over the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.
DAVID MAIALETTI / Staff Photographer
A member of the National Guard rest after protesters leave the area in front of City Hall in Philadelphia, Pa. on June 1, 2020. It was the third day of protests protests over the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Monday’s 6 p.m. curfew is in effect, though a large protest near 676 and smaller protests in other parts of the city continue.

The city-wide curfew goes until 6 a.m. Tuesday. It’s the third consecutive day of citywide curfews for all but those working in essential jobs as unrest continues in the wake of George Floyd’s death.

The city has not said if it will impose a curfew Tuesday, which is primary day in Pennsylvania, though District Attorney Larry Kranser said people voting will not be in violation of any potential curfew.

— Julia Terruso

5:58 PM - June 1, 2020
5:58 PM - June 1, 2020

Gov. Wolf says state will pay to help rebuild Philly

Vanessa Torres, who is a volunteer, cleans up outside the Rite Aid at C Street and Allegheny Avenue with bags of merchandise in Philadelphia, Pa. on June 1, 2020. The store was looted.
DAVID MAIALETTI / Staff Photographer
Vanessa Torres, who is a volunteer, cleans up outside the Rite Aid at C Street and Allegheny Avenue with bags of merchandise in Philadelphia, Pa. on June 1, 2020. The store was looted.

Gov. Tom Wolf said the state will “need to contribute and invest in the rebuilding of Philadelphia" after touring parts of the city and meeting with Mayor Jim Kenney and clergy on Monday.

“When that starts and how we do that remains to be seen," Wolf said.

Wolf added that CARES Act which distributes money to businesses hit hard by the coronavirus was already being allocated to help those who had been doubly hit by the pandemic and looting.

“So many sad scenes,” Wolf said. “Food stores that have been gutted. Pharmacies that have been gutted...so we need to recognize that we have a lot of work to do to address the ills that the protests are about - racism is wrong. We need to establish a Commonwealth that absolutely is fair and decent and equal to every single Pennsylvanian...At the same time we cannot live with the basic necessities being taken out of circulation so we need to deescalate the violence.”

Wolf wouldn’t comment on how Philadelphia police have been handling the protests.

He wasn’t on a call earlier today with President Trump in which Trump called governors “weak,” but pushed back on the characterization.

“I’m not sure he understands what I’ve done and I certainly haven’t heard that charge,” Wolf said. “I disagree with that.”

— Pranshu Verma and Julia Terruso

5:52 PM - June 1, 2020
5:52 PM - June 1, 2020

Man rips up woman’s Black Lives Matter sign as group gathers to support police in Fishtown

In Fishtown, a group of people gathered in support of the police, who were erecting barricades on Girard Avenue.

Two people protesting police brutality were also on the street. One of the supporters of the police grabbed one woman’s sign, which said “Black Lives Matter,” and ripped it up.

“You’re not ruining our neighborhood,” another man screamed at the demonstrators just before 5:30 p.m.

— Vinny Vella

5:43 PM - June 1, 2020
5:43 PM - June 1, 2020

Confrontation between police and protesters on Benjamin Franklin Parkway

Police and protesters got into a confrontation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Police sprayed a chemical in protesters’ faces, and the demonstrators ran.

This was minutes after hundreds of protesters gathered a distance away from an armored SWAT vehicle that had parked on the Parkway. Kneeling or putting their hands up in the air, they chanted “Hands up, don’t shoot!”

— Oona Goodin-Smith

5:36 PM - June 1, 2020
5:36 PM - June 1, 2020

Mail-in ballot deadline extended one week for Tuesday’s primary

A voter prepares to drop off their ballot into a ballot drop box at the south portal of City Hall on Thursday, May 28, 2020.
YONG KIM / Staff Photographer
A voter prepares to drop off their ballot into a ballot drop box at the south portal of City Hall on Thursday, May 28, 2020.

Election officials in Philadelphia and surrounding counties will have a seven day extension on processing ballots, Gov. Wolf announced. Voters must still have their ballots postmarked by Tuesday, June 2.

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf initially suggested he had extended the deadline for the entire state. The current deadline requires elections officials to have received mail ballots by 8 p.m. on Tuesday, when polls close

“The count will continue for seven days after tomorrow," Wolf said Monday, as days of civil unrest and violent clashes over the death of Minnesota man George Floyd as police knelt on his neck had officials scrambling to conduct Tuesday’s election safely.

“I can’t do anything about the election day, but I am extending the time to actually get votes in,” Wolf said. "So if you vote and the vote gets in by next Tuesday... it’ll count.”

But Wolf apparently misspoke: His executive order allows mail ballots to be counted if they are postmarked by Tuesday and received within a week. And it will apply only to Philadelphia, Delaware, Montgomery, Allegheny, Dauphin, and Erie Counties.

The ballots will need to be received by 8 p.m. June 9, Wolf said at a news conference in Philadelphia.

County elections officials had warned that thousands of voters would likely be disenfranchised under the deadline set in state law, which does not allow postmarks. That may work under normal circumstances, officials said, but the pandemic and a change in state law led to an unexpected flood of mail ballot requests that county officials struggled to handle while also preparing an in-person election.

— Jonathan Lai

5:30 PM - June 1, 2020
5:30 PM - June 1, 2020

Arrests underway after protesters streamed onto 676

People handcuffed during a march against police brutality wait to be loaded into a police bus on the Vine Street Expressway on Monday, June 1, 2020.
Jessica Griffin / Staff photographer
People handcuffed during a march against police brutality wait to be loaded into a police bus on the Vine Street Expressway on Monday, June 1, 2020.

Dozens of people on I-676 appeared to be arrested after police fired gas into a massive crowd blocking the highway.

At least 25 people had their hands tied and were seated on the highway barrier, some lined up in front of a Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office bus.

— Jessica Griffin

5:09 PM - June 1, 2020
5:09 PM - June 1, 2020

Cops fire gas at protesters blocking 676

Protesters overtake the Vine Street Expressway while marching against police brutality in Philadelphia on Monday, June 1, 2020.
Jessica Griffin / Staff photographer
Protesters overtake the Vine Street Expressway while marching against police brutality in Philadelphia on Monday, June 1, 2020.

Police fired what appeared to be tear gas into a crowd of thousands of marchers protesters blocking I-676.

After a few bangs and the release of the gas people started fleeing the area shouting, “Tear gas! Tear gas!” Protesters were left scrambling up walls, falling over each other to get away with nowhere to run crammed in the middle of the street.

Police threw tear gas at every safe escape off the highway. There was no where to run without going right into the smoke. People were grabbing each other, dragging their friends up walls and holding onto bikes to climb up the grass slopes.

Using armored vehicles, police blocked off the entrance to 676 near 22nd street but thousands of protesters had already filled the highway.

— Kristen Graham and Ellie Rushing

5:09 PM - June 1, 2020
5:09 PM - June 1, 2020

Ben Franklin Bridge closed ‘until further notice’

The Benjamin Franklin Bridge has been closed “until further notice” due to police activity, the Delaware River Port Authority announced Monday afternoon.

— Rob Tornoe

4:44 PM - June 1, 2020
4:44 PM - June 1, 2020

Thousands of marchers fan out across I-676, blocking traffic

Thousands of marchers moved from Center City to I-676, fanning out across the highway and completely blocking both sides just before 5 p.m.

The group was cheering and walk across the highway as cars backed up.A different crowd went down Broad Street, where they met a line of police officers when they reached the intersection at Cherry Street. The crowd knelt to the ground and began chanting, demanding that police take a knee. The police faced marchers in the front who held up a sign as they knelt reading “A riot is the language of the unheard.”

— Ellie Rushing and Allison Steele

4:34 PM - June 1, 2020
4:34 PM - June 1, 2020

Music industry will halt operations Tuesday to focus attention on racial injustice

The music industry will halt everyday operations on Tuesday to focus attention on racial injustice.

The initiative, called Black Out Tuesday, quickly gathered steam online after founders Jamila Thomas of Atlantic Records and Brianna Agyemang of the creative services company Platoon issued a call to action on Friday night in response to protests in Minneapolis over the police of George Floyd.

Using the hashtag, #TheShowMustBePaused, the initial post urged: “Please join us as we take an urgent step of action to provoke accountability and change ... as a gatekeepers of the culture it is our responsibility to not only come together to celebrate the wins, but also hold each other up during a loss. Join us on Tuesday June 2 as a day to disconnect from work and reconnect with our community.

”Major record labels have joined in with Blackout concept. Columbia Records, the label home to Beyonce, Bruce Springsteen and John Legend said in a statement: “This is not a day off. Instead, this is a day to move forward in solidarity.”

— Dan DeLuca

4:25 PM - June 1, 2020
4:25 PM - June 1, 2020

A moment of harmony at City Hall

Four Philadelphia Police Officers join protesters in taking a knee as a nonviolent demonstration made its way around City Hall on Monday, June 1, 2020.
Sean Collins Walsh
Four Philadelphia Police Officers join protesters in taking a knee as a nonviolent demonstration made its way around City Hall on Monday, June 1, 2020.

As a nonviolent demonstration made its way around City Hall on Monday afternoon, one of the protesters, Andre DuCally, 22, stopped to see if he could find common ground with three police officers who were watching over the scene.

DuCally, who is African-American, said he didn’t support those who were damaging property and looting.

“I don’t get why black communities are f-ing up other black communities,” the 22-year-old Philadelphia resident said. But, he said, he doesn’t understand why it is so hard to reform policing so that deaths like George Floyd’s don’t happen.

A white officer whose last name is Brady said he supported DuCally’s right to raise those concerns.

“We’re here to protect your right to assembly and free speech. You should enjoy it,” said Brady, who, like the other officers, declined to give their first names.

“I don't know. I feel like there’s just a lot more that needs to happen,” DuCally said.

Another officer, Pouncey, said there are productive ways to effect change and ways that work against the cause.

“We’ve got to … take the steps to get to the solution,” said Pouncey, who is black. “Because we all want the same thing.”

Brady agreed.

“Peaceful protesting is one thing. Looting, rioting and destroying property is another,” he said. “How bad was the economy during the coronavirus? And now the small businesses are destroyed and there’s no way to recover.”

DuCally started to respond when Brady cut in: “Give me a hug.”

“Huh?” DuCally said.

“Give me a hug,” the officer said again. “Nobody will do that, and that's the problem.”

Brady and Pouncey each hugged DuCally. But he wasn’t satisfied.

“It’s little stuff like that,” he said. “It’s like, alright, you gave me a hug. Why can’t you all take a knee when we take a knee?”

“It’s not my thing,” Brady said.

Nearby, a group of protesters were imploring other police officers to take a knee. Four joined the group in kneeling, and the crowd erupted. One protester wept.

“Take a knee. Take a knee. We love you. We love you,” another protester said. “When the revolution comes, we will need you.”

— Sean Walsh

4:22 PM - June 1, 2020
4:22 PM - June 1, 2020

Protest reaches City Hall

Protesters march against police brutality with against the backdrop of Philadelphia’s City Hall on Monday, June 1, 2020.
Jessica Griffin / Staff Photographer
Protesters march against police brutality with against the backdrop of Philadelphia’s City Hall on Monday, June 1, 2020.

The first of the at least 1,000 protesters marching down Market Street reached City Hall around 4:15 p.m., beginning to circle the building as they chanted.

Meanwhile, many of the protesters that peacefully marched down Broad Street earlier in the day dispersed after a tense standoff with a police barricade on the corner of Broad Street and Olney Avenue. Some headed back toward City Hall.

— Allison Steele and Pranshu Verma

4:16 PM - June 1, 2020
4:16 PM - June 1, 2020

‘Say his name!’ ‘George Floyd!’

Protesters march in memory of George Floyd in Center City Philadelphia on Monday, June 1, 2020.
Jessica Griffin / Staff Photographer
Protesters march in memory of George Floyd in Center City Philadelphia on Monday, June 1, 2020.

A massive march formed on Market Street as more than 1,000 people moved from the Philadelphia Police headquarters toward City Hall just after 4 p.m.

As they marched toward City Hall, passing 8th and Market Streets, they chanted, “Hands up, don’t shoot!”

At 10th and Market, the crowd paused. Hundreds knelt on the ground, filling the street. “Say his name!” a speaker shouted, and the crowd returned, “George Floyd!” They repeated the chant, as the stood, black and brown and white fists still raised, and resumed the march to City Hall.

People along the crowd route were snapping photos, raising fists, and chanting “Black Lives Matter!” and “George Floyd!” Helicopters were hovering. Another group of protesters at City Hall headed east down Market and joined up with the larger group.

— Ellie Rushing and Kristen Graham

4:00 PM - June 1, 2020
4:00 PM - June 1, 2020

Kenney: Philadelphia is in ‘one of the biggest crises in the city’s history’

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney, seen here during a press briefing on Sunday.
YONG KIM / Staff Photographer
Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney, seen here during a press briefing on Sunday.

Mayor Jim Kenney said Monday that Philadelphia is “in the middle of one of the biggest crises in the city’s history.”

"I’m worried about everything. I'm worried about people's safety. I haven’t slept much, to tell you the truth," Kenney told reporters at an afternoon news conference. "We’re worried about everything."

The city may not have enough energy and resources to begin reopening on Friday, Kenney said, saying “we’re tied up with” a pandemic, a depression, civil unrest, and primary election.

City and congressional representatives urged Philadelphians to continue wearing masks, social distancing, and staying home.

“The pandemic has not been canceled," said Rep. Brendan Boyle (D., Phila.). "The virus COVID-19 still exists. It doesn’t know or care about the sort of tumult that the United States of America is involved in over the last several days."

— Justine McDaniel

3:51 PM - June 1, 2020
3:51 PM - June 1, 2020

Hundreds gather at police headquarters

Protesters gather at police headquarters on Monday, as protests continue in the city following the death of George Floyd days ago in Minneapolis.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
Protesters gather at police headquarters on Monday, as protests continue in the city following the death of George Floyd days ago in Minneapolis.

A crowd of several hundred people at 8th and Race gathered for a “speak out” and marched to the front entrance of Philadelphia police headquarters on Monday afternoon.

Determined, anguished, and peaceful, the crowd carried signs and raised fists in the air. Police formed a line in front of their headquarters.

“I have been grieving my entire life,” one speaker said, shouting through a megaphone while fighting back tears. “I see all of the loss, I see all the opportunities for a good education, safe affordable housing, healthy choices, safety, that have been taken from us because of our blackness."

"Stop killing us," she implored.

Earlier, another speaker said protesting this weekend was not enough.

"What we need is we need organization of the working people," he said. "What we need is we need a system of our own that we can use to rise up against, overcome, and crush the system that has been oppressing not just black people, not just people that look like me, but that has been oppressing every single one of us."

The crowd erupted in cheers.

— Kristen Graham

3:46 PM - June 1, 2020
3:46 PM - June 1, 2020

Murphy thinks Trump’s focus on isolated violence is misplaced

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, seen speaking during a coronavirus press conference last week.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, seen speaking during a coronavirus press conference last week.

After President Donald Trump told governors they were “weak” and needed to crack down on looting and vandalism amid protests of police brutality, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said he thought the president should’ve focused on the root of the problem, not on isolated incidents of violence.

“I would’ve liked to have seen a lot more about social injustice and systemic racism in America and how we got to this point and where we go from here,” Murphy said. Despite slavery having been long abolished, “we still see a black man basically murdered right before our eyes. That’s where we think our focus has to be.”

The governor said he told the president that New Jersey saw more than 30 organized protests over the weekend, and only the demonstrations in Atlantic City and Trenton ended with some arrests.

Asked if he had a concern about people gathering despite the state’s emergency coronavirus orders prohibiting gatherings of more than 25 people, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said he viewed these protests in a different category than others.

“It’s one thing to protest what day nail salons are opening,” he said. “It’s another thing to come out in peaceful protests, overwhelmingly, for a man who was killed right before our eyes … I put those into different orbits.”

The governor said he was pleased to see many people wearing masks at protests, and some organizers even handing them out. He urged protesters to continue to cover their faces and keep their distance from others whenever possible.

He added: “I think we have to respect the right for people to protest.”

— Erin McCarthy

3:36 PM - June 1, 2020
3:36 PM - June 1, 2020

Protests briefly turn tense as demonstrators meet police on Broad Street

Protestors face off with police officers at Broad and Olney after marching from Spring Garden in Philadelphia on Monday, June 1, 2020.
Monica Herndon / Staff photographer
Protestors face off with police officers at Broad and Olney after marching from Spring Garden in Philadelphia on Monday, June 1, 2020.

After peacefully marching for five miles, Philadelphia’s protests on Monday against the killing of George Floyd were met with a police barricade on the corner of Broad Street and Olney Ave.

“Stand down,” a marchgoer, Elaine P. said over a loudspeaker, urging protesters to keep calm and not agitate the over 30 police officers blocking the street.

There was a fire one block north on the protest route being dealt with by the city Fire Department. Cops did not confirm that was the reason they stopped the protests.

The scene turned tense for a moment, as protesters demanded to pass the barricade. Organizers urged continued restraint, while many marchers took a knee and raised their fists.

One protester was arrested, but it was unclear why. Members in the crowd questioned the arrest, saying “We’re not doing anything.”

A person who joined a march for George Floyd on Broad Street has been arrested in Philadelphia on Monday, June 1, 2020.
Pranshu Verma / Staff
A person who joined a march for George Floyd on Broad Street has been arrested in Philadelphia on Monday, June 1, 2020.

The crowd of around 50 ultimately turned around and headed Southbound on Broad Street. There was no further confrontation between protesters and police.

“That’s how you do that shit,” Elaine P. said.

— Pranshu Verma

3:32 PM - June 1, 2020
3:32 PM - June 1, 2020

Police officers take a knee with protesters outside City Hall

— Sean Walsh

3:27 PM - June 1, 2020
3:27 PM - June 1, 2020

Philly police commissioner: ‘We have been sitting on a powder keg for quite some time and it has burst’

Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw speaks during a news conference Saturday.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw speaks during a news conference Saturday.

On Sunday, Philadelphia police officers and firefighters responded to 378 fires, 14 fires that were declared arson, 246 commercial burglaries, four acts of graffiti, and 154 acts of vandalism, along with 21 shooting victims, Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said at an afternoon news conference.

“As has been the case all weekend, these criminal acts are completely disconnected from any noble cause, legitimate protest or exercise of First Amendment guarantees,” Outlaw said.

Eighteen police officers were injured, two of whom remain hospitalized. Injuries included chemical burns, broken bones, and head injuries. At least five were injured in West Philadelphia, where Outlaw reported police cars were set on fire and people threw bricks, rocks, and Molotov cocktails around the area of 52nd and Market Streets during Sunday’s unrest.

Of the 418 people so far arrested for failure to disperse or obey curfew, 314 were city residents, Outlaw said.

With more protest activity in Center City on Monday, police would continue to restrict areas downtown and enforce the 6 p.m. curfew, she said, with assistance from the National Guard and other local law enforcement agencies.

“What you’re seeing across the country right now is unlike any of us have seen. We have been sitting on a powder keg for quite some time and it has burst,” Outlaw said. “You layer that with the level of the anger that’s been pent up, and then you add technology.”

The police department has to adapt to technology's role in the protests and the “countertactics” it allows demonstrators to use, which have changed the way police need to manage crowds, she said. She said people have used coordinated efforts to disperse activity across the city and make police split up, and that police need more resources to manage such situations.

“What happened yesterday is that we were there, we addressed it, and then we could only stay for so long and we had to leave and then it rekindled all over again,” Outlaw said.

“We don’t know what we’re going to be dealing with and it continues to unfold each and every day,” she added.

— Justine McDaniel

3:26 PM - June 1, 2020
3:26 PM - June 1, 2020

Philly schools ready to support students virtually, Hite says

Philadelphia students can contact teachers, administrators, or others at their schools for support during this “extremely painful week,” City Schools Superintendent William R. Hite said Monday.

“I am aware of the trauma children may experience when they see reports of a black or brown person whose life seems to have little or no value, and I understand the fear that may come with seeing neighborhoods they know and love destroyed,” Hite said. “Our school communities are in mourning right now.”

He said all schools are working with children virtually and are “providing safe spaces for children.” Children and families can also call or text the Philly Hope Line for support at 833-745-4674. It runs from noon to 9 p.m. on weekdays and noon to 4 p.m. on weekends.

He implored students to continue following social distancing and curfew guidelines as the district gets ready to celebrate the end of the school year and the class of 2020.

— Justine McDaniel

3:24 PM - June 1, 2020
3:24 PM - June 1, 2020

Family autopsy: Floyd asphyxiated by sustained pressure

An autopsy commissioned for George Floyd’s family found that he died of asphyxiation due to neck and back compression when a Minneapolis police officer held his knee on Floyd’s neck for several minutes and ignored his cries of distress, the family’s attorneys said Monday.

The autopsy by a doctor who also examined Eric Garner’s body found the compression cut off blood to Floyd’s brain, and weight on his back made it hard to breathe, attorney Ben Crump said at a news conference.

The family’s autopsy differs from the official autopsy as described in a criminal complaint against the officer. That autopsy included the effects of being restrained, along with underlying health issues and potential intoxicants in Floyd’s system, but also said it found nothing “to support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation.”

— Associated Press

3:20 PM - June 1, 2020
3:20 PM - June 1, 2020

Kenney asks people to stay home, requested Election Day help from state

Mayor Jim Kenney said Monday that he did not know whether the city would move into the yellow phase of reopening as scheduled on Friday.

“I’m not saying no, but I’m not saying yes either,” he said.

Kenney said he and his staff had spoken with Gov. Tom Wolf on Monday about the response to the unrest and asked for more resources. He also asked for the state’s help with Tuesday’s primary election and asked for an extension of the deadline for mail-in ballots.

The city asked the state to help make "sure our polling places were secured," Kenney said. “I am hopeful that despite the situation, all Philadelphians will find a way to exercise their right to vote.”

City offices were closed Monday and there was no decision yet on how long they would remain closed.

Kenney said he was “extremely disappointed” by people ignoring curfew, especially minors. He asked people to stay home and keep their children and teens home Monday.

“This will go a long way to reduce the potential of someone getting hurt,” he said. “These are important first steps toward rebuilding and healing our great city.”

Asked about President Donald Trump’s tweets, in which he has said Democratic leaders need to be “tougher,” Kenney said: “He’s brought nothing to the-- he’s brought no help. Nothing. All he knows how to do is tweet and create division. And it’s just, it’s enough. It’s really enough.”

— Justine McDaniel

2:58 PM - June 1, 2020
2:58 PM - June 1, 2020

Philly protests on Broad Street remain mostly peaceful

The George Floyd protests on Broad Street Monday afternoon continued to be peaceful, with organizers urging demonstrators to stay strong after walking at least five miles.

“Don’t get tired,” a marchgoer, Elaine P. said. “These police never get tired of killing us.”

— Pranshu Verma and Lauren Schneiderman

2:49 PM - June 1, 2020
2:49 PM - June 1, 2020

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy wants to ‘lift up’ peaceful protests

Camden County Metro Police Chief Joe Wysocki raises a fist while marching with Camden residents and activists in Camden, N.J. on Saturday. (April Saul via AP)
April Saul / AP
Camden County Metro Police Chief Joe Wysocki raises a fist while marching with Camden residents and activists in Camden, N.J. on Saturday. (April Saul via AP)

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said he wanted to “lift up” peaceful protests and supported residents across the state who over the weekend protested the death of George Floyd, who was killed at the hands of Minneapolis police.

“I know the pain associated with this movement is real,” Murphy said, “and it’s representative of a society that has been largely unresponsive to calls for change from black and brown communities.”

The governor said he was moved to see people of all races coming together to raise their voices in outrage.

“People with privilege are now recognizing the pain of those without,” he said.

As former President Barack Obama had hours earlier in an essay, the governor commended the Camden city police for walking with protesters and applauded peaceful protests elsewhere, including in Newark.

The governor reflected on the past week’s events during the first 10 minutes of his daily coronavirus briefing, and highlighted young people he works with who are working to affect change.

“As George Floyd’s tragic death shows us, our work is not done,” he said. “We need actions not words. It can’t be for a moment, or even a year, we need to make generational, permanent change.”

— Erin McCarthy

2:40 PM - June 1, 2020
2:40 PM - June 1, 2020

Lancaster officials say group of armed, white men instigated violence during protests

Lancaster officials called Monday for an end to protests in the city because several armed “agitators” and possibly white nationalist groups had attended demonstrations over the weekend.

Mayor Danene Sorace said at a news conference she received “numerous credible threats of people not from the city of Lancaster who are coming into the city to incite violence. I am concerned and worried about our peaceful demonstrators.”

At weekend protests, police discovered between five and 15 people in the crowd who were armed and wearing body armor, Chief Jarrad Berkihiser said, and saw “definite evidence that we believe white nationals, white nationalists groups were here.

”Whenever officers were hit with rocks or water bottles of cayenne pepper, the projectiles were being thrown by white people in the crowd, the chief said. Police are going through footage to try and identify the individuals.

Sorace emotionally pleaded with residents to “stay home,” saying she worried about children and young activists being hurt.

Most protests in Lancaster have been peaceful, the officials said, and only a few people have been cited and released.

Demonstrators did gather late Monday morning in Lancaster on sidewalks, Lancaster Online reported, but there had been reported incidents of violence as of early Monday afternoon.

— Erin McCarthy

2:36 PM - June 1, 2020
2:36 PM - June 1, 2020

Police: 429 arrests in weekend of unrest in Philadelphia

Police said 429 people were arrested in the unrest that hit different parts of Philadelphia over the weekend after protests over the killing of George Floyd devolved into violence.

267 people were cited for curfew violations and for failing to disburse, 146 people were charged with looting/burglary, and seven were charged with assaulting on police

— Rob Tornoe

2:32 PM - June 1, 2020
2:32 PM - June 1, 2020

George Floyd’s brother calls for peace: ‘Let’s do this another way’

Terrance Floyd, the younger brother of George Floyd, called for peace on Monday while visiting the site where his brother was killed by police officers in Minneapolis.

“That’s not going to bring my brother back at all,” Floyd said of riots and looting that has occurred there and in other cities across the country. “It may feel good for the moment... but when they come down, you’re going to wonder what you did.”

“My family is a peaceful family. My family is God-fearing. Yeah, we’re upset,” Floyd added, "But let’s do this another way.

— Rob Tornoe

2:15 PM - June 1, 2020
2:15 PM - June 1, 2020

'They stood with us’: Obama commends Camden police for joining protesters

Lt. Zack James of the Camden County Metro Police Department marches along with demonstrators in Camden, N.J. on Saturday to protest the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. (April Saul via AP)
April Saul / AP
Lt. Zack James of the Camden County Metro Police Department marches along with demonstrators in Camden, N.J. on Saturday to protest the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. (April Saul via AP)

Former President Barack Obama expressed solidarity with peaceful protesters and commended the Camden police for joining in demonstrations there over the weekend. He shared the message in an essay entitled “How to Make this Moment the Turning Point for Real Change,” which he published Monday on Medium.

Obama wrote that the protests are rooted in “a genuine and legitimate frustration over a decades-long failure to reform police practices and the broader criminal justice system.”

“The overwhelming majority of participants have been peaceful, courageous, responsible, and inspiring,” he said. “They deserve our respect and support, not condemnation — something that police in cities like Camden and Flint have commendably understood.”

In Camden, the city’s police chief, Joe Wysocki, and other officers walked with protesters and raised their fists as they decried the death of George Floyd, who was killed when a Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck for nearly nine minutes.

“They didn’t try to use their authority to control the crowds," the Camden march organizer told The Inquirer. “They made it about the people, about how we feel. They stood with us.”

In Obama’s essay, he went on to encourage people to vote in national, state, and local elections in order to enact change, and sent a message to people who have engaged in looting and vandalism.

“So let’s not excuse violence, or rationalize it, or participate in it,” Obama said. “If we want our criminal justice system, and American society at large, to operate on a higher ethical code, then we have to model that code ourselves.”

— Erin McCarthy

2:05 PM - June 1, 2020
2:05 PM - June 1, 2020

Record store owner: ‘I’ve seen riots, but never seen anything like this’

Mike Cooper, owner of Borderline Records & Tapes, in front of his locked store on Girard Avenue on Monday, June 1, 2020. Business owners are on alert for potential destruction and looting, as protests continue throughout Philadelphia.
Allison Steele / Staff
Mike Cooper, owner of Borderline Records & Tapes, in front of his locked store on Girard Avenue on Monday, June 1, 2020. Business owners are on alert for potential destruction and looting, as protests continue throughout Philadelphia.

Business owners along West Girard Avenue east of Broad Street scrambled to lock their doors and pull down metal grates as they heard word that a mob of looters was headed their way. After a few minutes, it seemed to have been a false alarm, and some reopened doors. But many remained outside on the street, watching for signs of trouble.

Mike Cooper, who owns Borderline Records and Tapes, said he was born in Kensington and has lived in the area all his life.

“I was here for the MOVE (bombing), I’ve seen riots, but never seen anything like this,” he said.

Throughout the day, he said he and other neighboring businesses have seen people biking or driving up and down the streets, looking in windows and, he believes, pointing at possible targets for looting.

“I’m most worried about the vandalism,” he said. “I’ve seen a lot of businesses come and go here, I’d like to see these stay.”

— Allison Steele

1:40 PM - June 1, 2020
1:40 PM - June 1, 2020

U.S. Attorney threatens to bring federal charges on rioters, looters in Philly

People inside loot the inside of Lowes at Park West Town Center in West Philadelphia on Sunday, May 31, 2020.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
People inside loot the inside of Lowes at Park West Town Center in West Philadelphia on Sunday, May 31, 2020.

U.S. Attorney William McSwain threatened Monday to bring federal charges against people who riot or loot in the Philadelphia area, saying “it is time to confront any continued violence and stop it in its tracks.”

McSwain, the U.S. Attorney in Philadelphia, said destruction of property and attacks on police “endangers the lives and the livelihoods of others and interferes with the rights of peaceful protesters as well as the rights of other citizens of this city. It also undercuts the work that needs to be done to address people’s legitimate grievances.”

McSwain also said there may be some people from outside Philadelphia inciting riots, but that he did not think people affiliated with the Antifa movement were the ones doing the looting. The “vast majority” of looting is “opportunistic” and “local,” McSwain said, adding that some of it may be tied to local gangs.

Speaking at a news conference in Philadelphia, McSwain and Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) both expressed disgust at the actions that led to the death of George Floyd, and said the police officer who knelt on the man’s neck will be held accountable by the justice system. They also expressed support for people’s rights to peacefully protest, but condemned violence, and offered support for police.“

The video of his death is sickening to watch,” Toomey said. He added that “the vast majority” of police “are hard working, honorable people who do the right thing but, like any other profession, any other walk of life or group or organization, there will be bad apples and they need to be held accountable when they commit this conduct.”

But, Toomey said, “while Americans have the right to peacefully protest, “no one has the right to violently riot” and he called for support for police officers trying to stop them.

— Jonathan Tamari and Chris Palmer

1:23 PM - June 1, 2020
1:23 PM - June 1, 2020

Chester, Bucks County officials say local protests have remained peaceful

Chester County officials say protests in their area have remained peaceful as of Monday morning. As outrage seeps over from the city to the suburbs, the commissioners expressed solidarity with everyone who is heartbroken and angered by the death of George Floyd, who was killed when a Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck.

“We express our deepest condolences to Mr. Floyd’s family, his friends and to everyone who has wept at the unnecessary, painful final minutes of his life,” the commissioners said in a statement. “Although many of us will never know firsthand, the cloud of pain and suppression that hangs heavy over so many people of color in America today, we do share in the anger and the hurt.”

The three-person board said they hope to facilitate productive dialogue in their community to combat racial injustice, adding “we are proud that protests occurring in Chester County are peaceful and respectful.”

Bucks County District Attorney Matthew Weintraub said protests have also been peaceful there.

"Like many of you, I’ve watched George Floyd’s killing on video with feelings of revulsion, sadness and helplessness," the district attorney said Monday in a letter to the community. "People have the right to express their anger through peaceful assembly, but I don’t understand it when lawless people co-opt peaceful protests by pillaging and burning the communities around them. Thanks to all of you, that has not happened here."

— Erin McCarthy

1:10 PM - June 1, 2020
1:10 PM - June 1, 2020

Philadelphia will enforce 6 p.m. curfew Monday night

A protestor interacts with Philadelphia police at 52nd and Chestnut Streets on Sunday. The city will enforce a curfew Monday night beginning at 6 p.m. through 6 a.m. Tuesday morning.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
A protestor interacts with Philadelphia police at 52nd and Chestnut Streets on Sunday. The city will enforce a curfew Monday night beginning at 6 p.m. through 6 a.m. Tuesday morning.

Philadelphia on Monday will enforce a 6 p.m. curfew, Mayor Jim Kenney’s office has announced.

Monday will be the third consecutive day of citywide curfews for all but those working in essential jobs as unrest continues in the wake of George Floyd’s death.

— Sean Walsh

1:04 PM - June 1, 2020
1:04 PM - June 1, 2020

Demonstrators protesting peacefully in Spring Garden

Protesters peacefully gathered on the corner of Broad St and Spring Garden to protest police brutality and the killing of George Floyd.
Pranshu Verma / Staff
Protesters peacefully gathered on the corner of Broad St and Spring Garden to protest police brutality and the killing of George Floyd.

A group of around 100 protestors peacefully gathered on the corner of Broad Street and Spring Garden Monday to protest police brutality and the killing of George Floyd.

“Do not touch any of these officers,” a protest organizer said. “If you do, you know what’ll happen.”

Protestors, urging unity and peace, were followed along North Broad Street by cops on bikes. Some demonstrators gave cops the middle finger. Others chanted, “I Can’t Breathe,” “Black Lives Matter,” and “No Justice No Peace.”

“[Cops] didn’t have to kill my man like that,” Terry Williams, 52, of Northeast Philadelphia said of Floyd’s killing. “I want peace, that’s why I’m out here walking today.”

— Pranshu Verma

12:53 PM - June 1, 2020
12:53 PM - June 1, 2020

No, protesters did not break into the Philadelphia Zoo

The Humbolt Penguins, seen here in 2019, are safe following false rumors on social media the Philadelphia Zoo had been broken into.
MICHAEL BRYANT / Staff Photographer
The Humbolt Penguins, seen here in 2019, are safe following false rumors on social media the Philadelphia Zoo had been broken into.

Following a second night of violence and looting Sunday night led to false rumors on social media that people broke into the Philadelphia Zoo and let animals loose.

“That’s not true. The animals are safe at home in their exhibits, and the zoo was not broken into,” said spokesperson Dana Lombardo.

— Rob Tornoe

12:45 PM - June 1, 2020
12:45 PM - June 1, 2020

'Everything is fluid’: Philly officials scrambling ahead of Tuesday’s primary election

A voter walks with their ballot to a ballot drop box at the south portal of City Hall.
YONG KIM / Staff Photographer
A voter walks with their ballot to a ballot drop box at the south portal of City Hall.

With polls opening in less than 24 hours, Philadelphia elections officials were scrambling Monday to figure out how to conduct an already difficult election during widespread civil unrest.

“Everything is fluid,” said Nick Custodio, deputy commissioner under Lisa Deeley, the chair of the Philadelphia City Commissioners.

The commissioners, the three elected officials who run the city’s elections, relocated staff and about 30,000 ballots from their offices in City Hall this weekend as protesters set fire to cars outside and smashed windows.

It’s a nightmare scenario for elections administrators, who were already dealing with a massive surge of mail-in ballots due to the coronavirus pandemic and changes to election law.

“We are still monitoring the situation and discussing it,” Custodio said Monday. The commissioners were working with other city officials to figure out a plan, he said.

— Jonathan Lai

12:34 PM - June 1, 2020
12:34 PM - June 1, 2020

Trump calls governors ‘weak,’ urges them to ‘dominate’ protesters

President Donald Trump called the nation’s governors “weak” during a video teleconference Monday morning, demanding a tougher crackdown on protesters following another night of violence and looting in cites like Philadelphia.

Trump told leaders they "have to get much tougher” amid nationwide protests, otherwise they risk looking like “jerks.” He demanded cities like Philadelphia, New York, and Los Angeles mimic Minneapolis, where thousands of Minnesota National Guard members joined police in swarming the streets over the weekend.

“No domination. You have to dominate,” Trump said, according to audio of the call obtained by CNN. “Most of you are weak. You have to arrest people.”

— Rob Tornoe

12:20 PM - June 1, 2020
12:20 PM - June 1, 2020

Atlantic City mayor: 17 arrested in widespread looting, 7 p.m. curfew in place for a week

A window was broken at TD Bank in Atlantic City, N.J., on Sunday, May 31, 2020.
Amy Rosenberg / Staff
A window was broken at TD Bank in Atlantic City, N.J., on Sunday, May 31, 2020.

Atlantic City Mayor Marty Small Sr. said 17 people were arrested during Sunday’s widespread looting following a protest rally and standoffs with police. Six of those arrested were from Atlantic City, he said. Some were from out of state.

About 100 volunteers gathered Monday to finish sweeping up the glass from city streets outside 20 shops in The Tanger Outlets, and multiple other businesses, Small said investigations would continue into other perpetrators. The City's All Wars Memorial community building was also vandalized, he said, as well as the civil courthouse.

"As you know, Atlantic City was under siege yesterday," Small said.

He apologized to business owners and said the city was resilient. All over the city, businesses were being boarded up to prevent any further looting. A 7 p.m. curfew is in place until Monday, June 8. He condemned “those who take advantage to tear down the businesses.”

"Listen, our city is not perfect," he said.

More than 100 state troopers were sent in to Atlantic City, he said.

"As soon as we started to open up businesses to give our economy some sense of normalcy, this happens," he said. "This is our businesses district. They provide jobs to our children."

"I want to let the world know this is not going to stop us from thriving," he said.

— Amy Rosenberg

11:55 AM - June 1, 2020
11:55 AM - June 1, 2020

SEPTA halting Center City service starting at noon

SEPTA will stop all subway, bus, and trolley service in Center City Monday afternoon in preparation for another round of protests.

It had temporarily suspended service over the weekend amid demonstrations and violence sparked by the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police.

Starting at noon Monday, buses will be detoured or stopped south of Vine Street and north of South Street between the Delaware and the Schuylkill rivers. Meanwhile, trolleys will run with limited service from 30th Street into West and Southwest Philadelphia.

Market-Frankford Line and Broad Street Line subways will make all scheduled stops until 1 p.m., and then all Center City stops will be out of service. These suspensions will be in place until further notice, SEPTA said, and additional service adjustments are possible as the day goes on.

— Erin McCarthy

11:49 AM - June 1, 2020
11:49 AM - June 1, 2020

Residents launch grassroots efforts to clean up their neighborhoods after weekend unrest

Bring-your-own-broom clean-ups were held Monday morning across Philadelphia as residents worked to restore their neighborhoods after the weekend’s unrest and vandalism.

Along West Philadelphia’s 52nd street corridor, as well as in Germantown and Fairhill, people joined grassroots efforts, picking up trash and broken glass and sweeping the streets. The outrage of Saturday’s Center City protests spread outward to their communities on Sunday as people continued to protest the death of George Floyd, who was killed when a Minneapolis police kneeled on his neck.

As the anger erupted, businesses were looted and police cars burned. Outside a burned-out convenience store in West Philadelphia on Monday morning, a man raised his fist in solidarity with his community. Around him, people, many in masks, dispersed to clean the streets.

"These things can be replaced but we’re coming together,” Marietta Wesley, of West Philadelphia, said. “It hurt us watching it unfold, but that’s the victory the aftermath.”

Mayor Kenney and city officials are expected to tour the neighborhood’s clean up efforts Monday.

— Erin McCarthu and Pranshu Verma

11:27 AM - June 1, 2020
11:27 AM - June 1, 2020

Joe Biden meets with black leaders in Wilmington

Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden listens as clergy members and community activists speak during a visit to Bethel AME Church in Wilmington, Del., Monday, June 1, 2020.
Andrew Harnik / AP
Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden listens as clergy members and community activists speak during a visit to Bethel AME Church in Wilmington, Del., Monday, June 1, 2020.

Joe Biden met with community leaders at a predominantly African American church in Wilmington on Monday morning, leaving home for a second consecutive day to address exploding racial tensions that have begun to reshape the upcoming presidential election.

Biden, the former vice president who will represent Democrats on the ballot against President Donald Trump this fall, has struggled in recent weeks to be heard from his basement television studio over the noise of dueling national crises.

But after another night of violent protests, the 77-year-old Democrat gathered with roughly a dozen local black leaders during an intimate meeting in his hometown ahead of a virtual meeting with mayors across the nation.

— Associated Press

11:14 AM - June 1, 2020
11:14 AM - June 1, 2020

Philly D.A. Krasner says Rizzo statue should have been long gone

Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner says the Frank Rizzo statue “should have been removed long ago.”

Over the weekend, the statue became a focal point for protesters, who tried to burn and bring down the 10-foot bronze likeness of the former mayor who had a fraught relationship with the city’s black community and has been labeled as a racist.

Rizzo’s supporters say the former police commissioner was not racist and his tough, law-and-order style has been been misconstrued.

The district attorney, an advocate for criminal justice reform who spent much of his legal career as a civil rights lawyer, weighed in with a tweet Monday morning, saying: “So long as this monument to racist, unaccountable governance stands, we cannot achieve the justice and lasting peace we claim to seek. The Frank Rizzo statue should never have been erected, and should have been removed long ago.”

Mayor Jim Kenney said Sunday he planned to move the statue in the next month or so, a promise he’s made before.

“We’re going to accelerate its movement," Kenney said: “I can’t wait to see it go away.”

The statue was among the first things cleaned up Sunday, a move activists described as “one of the most tone-deaf things the city could have done.” Kenney said it was not intentionally singled out for early cleaning, but was scrubbed as part of a broader restoration efforts around City Hall.

— Erin McCarthy

10:46 AM - June 1, 2020
10:46 AM - June 1, 2020

Unrest spread to some towns bordering Philly

The looting and protests that roiled Philadelphia on Sunday spilled into some of the suburban counties that border the city as the sun set.

Officials in Upper Merion instituted a mandatory curfew in their township, after 12 people were arreted there late Saturday trying to break into the King of Prussia Mall. A similar curfew was put into place in Upper Darby, which shares a border with West Philadelphia and was the victim of some looting and vandalism after heated protests on nearby 52nd Street.

Police in Bensalem Township, the Bucks County municipality adjacent to Northeast Philadelphia, first were called to assist city police at the Philadelphia Mills Mall around 8 p.m., according to Police Superintendent Fred Harran.

Later, as looters drove deeper into the suburbs, the officers responded to the Neshaminy Mall for reports of a break-in at the Sears store there.

“To their surprise, they were met with an empty store, because Sears has been closed for about two years,” Harran said. “Thank God criminals are not that smart.”

Harran said his officers made about 10 arrests overnight Sunday, some at the mall, and some at the Fun Center Powersports on Bristol Pike, which was also vandalized.

Police in the township spent the rest of the night monitoring social media and patrolling retail corridors. Cars were spotted circling at least six locations including the Walmart in the Trevose section of the township

.Harran’s officers later set up a “checkpoint” near the line dividing the city and township, preventing people from getting in.

“By 1:30 a.m., the criminals knew Bensalem was not to be reckoned with,” Harran said. “Difficult times call for difficult measures."

— Vinny Vella

10:29 AM - June 1, 2020
10:29 AM - June 1, 2020

Police report at least 429 arrests in weekend of unrest in Philadelphia

Police, in their latest update, say at least 429 people were arrested in the unrest that hit different parts of Philadelphia over the weekend after protests over the killing of George Floyd devolved into violence.

On Sunday through Monday morning, police arrested 222 people, including 98 charged with looting/burglary, three with assaulting on police, one each for propulsion of missiles, riot and vandalism.

On Saturday, police arrested 207 people, including 48 charged with looting or burglary, three with assaulting police, four with theft and three with gun charges.

The rest of those arrested were issued citations for failure to disperse or violating curfew and released with summonses to appear in court at a later date.

— Jeremy Roebuck

9:54 AM - June 1, 2020
9:54 AM - June 1, 2020

Trash pickup in Philadelphia may be affected by the weekend’s unrest

Residents should expect delays in their trash pickup throughout the week as some crews are being diverted to help clean up areas that were trashed during the scattered disturbances over the weekend, a Streets Department spokesperson said.

But residents should keep putting out their trash on their regularly scheduled day, the spokesperson said. This week, there are no recycling pickups, because the city changed to an every-other-week schedule for that service amid the coronavirus shutdown.

— Erin McCarthy

3:59 AM - June 2, 2020
3:59 AM - June 2, 2020

City food, meal distributions sites are closed for the day

Timestamp 06/01 07:58am

Food and meal distribution sites in Philadelphia are closed Monday “to ensure everyone’s safety at this time,” the city announced on its website.

At these locations, Philadelphia families and senior citizens can get free meals, as can students who received reduced-price meals when school was in session.

The temporary closure of the sites comes after a weekend of unrest in the city in response to the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis.

— Erin McCarthy

6:50 AM - June 1, 2020
6:50 AM - June 1, 2020

SEPTA, PATCO resume service; Ben Franklin Bridge reopens

Both SEPTA and PATCO resumed service this morning and the Benjamin Franklin Bridge reopened after shutdowns prompted by unrest in Philadelphia on Sunday.

On the Market-Franford Line, however, shuttle buses were operating between Berks Station and Frankford Transportation Center in both directions after a on overnight 3-alarm fire in a building in Kensington beneath the El.

In a related note, the Schuylkill Expressway eastbound remains closed between the Vine Street Expressway and University Avenue. Construction on that stretch of I-76 was initially set to last through Sunday but has been extended after protests and violence throughout the city over the weekend.

— Staff Report

6:00 AM - June 1, 2020
6:00 AM - June 1, 2020

National Guard arrives in the city

Escorted by Philadelphia police, National Guard troops arrived in Center City around 12:45 am. Protests over the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis last week has led to nationwide unrest.
ELIZABETH ROBERTSON / Staff Photographer
Escorted by Philadelphia police, National Guard troops arrived in Center City around 12:45 am. Protests over the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis last week has led to nationwide unrest.

With the city nearly empty due to an overnight curfew, National Guard troops arrived in Philadelphia early Monday to support police after two days of unrest and looting sparked by protests against the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police.

The curfew ended at 6 a.m.

It was not immediately clear where the Guard will be deployed in Philadelphia but some military vehicles and armed troops were at City Hall after daylight.

Guard units have been deployed in cities around the nation that also have been racked by rioting after peaceful protests against Floyd’s death turned into unrest and rioting.

— Elizabeth Robertson

5:45 AM - June 1, 2020
5:45 AM - June 1, 2020

Will the protests cause a spike in COVID-19 cases? Wait two weeks.

Thousands take to the Art Museum steps during a protest against the death of George Floyd on Saturday.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photogra
Thousands take to the Art Museum steps during a protest against the death of George Floyd on Saturday.

At the protest outside City Hall in support of George Floyd on Saturday, people were spaced more than 6 feet apart — the recommended minimum for reducing the spread of the coronavirus. Most wore masks.

But later in the day, such as when crowds gathered outside the Philadelphia Museum of Art, many were not taking those precautions.

Could the protests here and elsewhere lead to a spike in COVID-19 cases? How about other recent outdoor events with large clusters of people, such as a Lake of the Ozarks pool party in Missouri on Memorial Day weekend?

The answer in either case will not be known for days, as symptoms from any new infections might not show up until two weeks after exposure.

There is one reason for cautious optimism: The events took place outside. Research to date suggests the coronavirus is far more likely to spread indoors, especially in poorly ventilated spaces.

— Tom Avril

5:30 AM - June 1, 2020
5:30 AM - June 1, 2020

As unrest spreads, Philly officials struggle to assess police response to the violence and looting

A police officer at 52nd and Chestnut Streets, May 31, 2020. Peaceful protests on Saturday and Sunday over the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis gave way to violence and vandalism in Philadelphia and across the country.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
A police officer at 52nd and Chestnut Streets, May 31, 2020. Peaceful protests on Saturday and Sunday over the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis gave way to violence and vandalism in Philadelphia and across the country.

As city officials on Sunday sought to explain how peaceful protests over police brutality a day earlier had morphed into looting and chaos in Center City, Philadelphia Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw acknowledged that the department’s plan for responding to the situation “did not happen as quickly as I would’ve liked it to occur.”

But even as Mayor Jim Kenney’s administration took steps designed to correct for that Sunday, the unrest spread into outlying city neighborhoods, prompting additional questions about whether police had adequately prepared for the mayhem that also gripped other major U.S. cities, and how long the volatility might linger.

Some within the department grumbled privately that officials were slow in preparing for protests that were not unexpected, leaving the city under-protected and under-resourced as pent-up frustration and anger swelled over last week’s killing of George Floyd while in the custody of Minneapolis police.

— Chris Palmer, Jeremy Roebuck and Mike Newall

5:15 AM - June 1, 2020
5:15 AM - June 1, 2020

Morning Roundup: Philadelphia convulses as protests and looting continue

Police at 52nd and Walnut Streets, May 31, 2020. Peaceful protests on Saturday and Sunday over the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis gave way to violence and vandalism in Philadelphia and across the country.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Police at 52nd and Walnut Streets, May 31, 2020. Peaceful protests on Saturday and Sunday over the police involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis gave way to violence and vandalism in Philadelphia and across the country.

A scorched and shaken Philadelphia convulsed on Sunday evening as looting continued and officials ordered new restrictions on movement following a spectacularly destructive night and day of fiery protest.

The acrid scent of smoke from burned stores hung in the air. The Benjamin Franklin Bridge was closed indefinitely, and PATCO canceled trains into Philadelphia. All businesses were ordered shuttered ahead of a 6 p.m. Sunday curfew, even as stores in North Philadelphia and West Philadelphia were being looted and police cars vandalized.

The National Guard arrived in Philadelphia early Monday to bolster police deployment. Meanwhile, Gov. Tom Wolf left open the possibility that the unrest could delay the city’s move to the color-coded “yellow phase” of lessened coronavirus restrictions at the end of the week.

SEPTA shut down all modes of transit until at least 6 a.m., and all city government offices will be closed Monday.

— Jeff Gammage, Chris Palmer and Ellie Rushing

5:00 AM - June 1, 2020
5:00 AM - June 1, 2020

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