11:38 PM - June 5, 2020
11:38 PM - June 5, 2020

Recap: Police official charged in beating; commanders worry about ‘blue flu’

The Pennsylvania National Guard will remain in Philadelphia “as long as we need them,” Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said Friday. She also said that her department had launched several internal affairs investigations into use of force by police officers during protests this week.

One was for an incident involving Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna Jr., but District Attorney Larry Krasner swooped in Friday and charged Bologna with felony aggravated assault and related offenses for the Monday beating of a Temple University student that was captured on video.

Officials were anticipating huge numbers of protesters in Philadelphia on Saturday, and there also was talk circulating about a “blue flu," or organized move by officers to call in sick in solidarity with Bologna.

The city announced street closures and mass transit plans in preparation for Saturday’s protests. Starting 11 a.m., most of Center City will be closed to traffic, from river to river and from South Street to Callowhill Street.

Around 1 a.m. Sunday, the controversial and currently defaced Frank Rizzo mural in the Italian Market will be removed. The mural of Rizzo, the city’s former mayor and police commissioner, has stood in the Italian Market for nearly 25 years. The move comes after the city removed Rizzo’s statue from outside the Municipal Services Building.

Read more of our coverage of today’s events:

10:27 PM - June 5, 2020
10:27 PM - June 5, 2020

Philly police commander acknowledges rumors of ‘blue flu’

With officials anticipating huge numbers of protesters in Philadelphia on Saturday, there was talk circulating late Friday about a “blue flu," or organized move by officers to call in sick in solidarity with the high-ranking officer arrested and charged with the beating of a Temple student this week.

Command staff were warning that such a move would only put other officers at risk.

“While it may feel good and provide satisfaction in the moment, [it] will only lead to the potential of other officers and supervisors being seriously injured,” Capt. Christine McShea of the 16th District in West Philadelphia wrote in an email to her staff. “While it may feel like punishment to the administration, it really only punishes other officers.”

— Jeremy Roebuck, William Bender, Mike Newall

9:35 PM - June 5, 2020
9:35 PM - June 5, 2020

FOP denounces arrest of Philly cop in Temple student beating

The head of the city’s police union denounced the arrest of a high-ranking city officer after video surfaced of him beating a Temple University student with a baton during a protest Monday along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, while Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said her department’s internal investigation was still ongoing.

District Attorney Larry Krasner, who days earlier had declined to prosecute the student, said Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna Jr. will face counts of felony aggravated assault, reckless endangerment and possession of an instrument of crime — his police baton.

“We are trying to be fair,” he said in a statement. “Accountability has to be equal and this moment demands a swift and evenhanded response to violent and criminal acts.”

Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police President John McNesby speaking with reporters on Sunday.
MONICA HERNDON / Staff Photographer
Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police President John McNesby speaking with reporters on Sunday.

Later, Outlaw said she had “not been made privy to the entirety of the information that led to Mr. Krasner’s decision" and that the police department’s investigation would continue.

“As a department, we do not condone the criminal acts of any person, and it is my sincere hope that the District Attorney does, in fact, hold all people who cause harm to others equally accountable," Outlaw said in a statement.

John McNesby, president of the FOP Lodge 5, came to Bologna’s defense, calling him one of the city’s “most decorated and respected police leaders” who had to make a split-second call in a chaotic situation.

He condemned Krasner for rushing to judgment and questioned the number of protesters, arrested for allegedly assaulting officers, who have already been released from jail as prosecutors declined to pursue cases against them.

“Why are officers not afforded those same basic rights?” McNesby asked in a statement.

— William Bender and Jeremy Roebuck

8:59 PM - June 5, 2020
8:59 PM - June 5, 2020

Man charged in attack against Associated Press photographer

Associated Press photographer Matt Rourke was assaulted while touring the business district at North Broad Street and Erie Avenue with Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw and Mayor Jim Kenney. Outlaw Outlaw (foreground) attends to the photographer as he lays on the sidewalk on Thursday.
Staff Photographer
Associated Press photographer Matt Rourke was assaulted while touring the business district at North Broad Street and Erie Avenue with Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw and Mayor Jim Kenney. Outlaw Outlaw (foreground) attends to the photographer as he lays on the sidewalk on Thursday.

A man who police say assaulted an Associated Press photographer in Philadelphia as the journalist was on assignment covering the city’s police commissioner was charged in the attack.

Derrick King, 31, was charged with aggravated assault, simple assault, endangering another person and resisting arrest. It’s unknown if the Philadelphia man has retained an attorney.

Matt Rourke was making photos of Commissioner Danielle Outlaw and Mayor Jim Kenney in North Philadelphia on Thursday afternoon while the two city officials spent time with community members ahead of a protest of the death of George Floyd, a black man who died in Minnesota after a white police officer pressed a knee into his neck for several minutes.

Before the protest began, Rourke was part of a news crew interviewing and photographing Kenney and Outlaw as they crossed the street.

A bystander walked up to Rourke, struck him in the face, causing him to lose consciousness and fall to the ground, striking his head, police said Friday.

It’s unclear what prompted the attack.

— Associated Press

8:15 PM - June 5, 2020
8:15 PM - June 5, 2020

FOP offers $10,000 reward for arrests in stolen welding tanks

The Fraternal Order of Police announced a $10,000 reward for information that leads to the arrest of three men suspected of burglarizing a Northeast Philadelphia business to steal oxygen and acetylene tanks used fo welding.

Surveillance video shows three men on Thursday cutting a hole in the fence of the business on Church Street, police said.

“These tanks are extremely dangerous if they end up in the wrong hands,” said FOP Lodge 5 President John McNesby. “We need to get these tanks and suspects off the street right away before someone is seriously injured.”

Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw expressed similar concerns earlier on Friday: “The tanks have not yet been recovered and are extremely dangerous in the hands of criminal actors and reckless or untrained persons.”

Tipster can call Philadelphia police at 215-686-TIPS or dial 911 with any leads.

— Robert Moran

7:07 PM - June 5, 2020
7:07 PM - June 5, 2020

Chefs lead a food giveaway to help West Philly, and beyond

Basimah McNeal, left, picks up a food bag from Chef Elijah Milligan, with help from Stephanie Willis and Kurt Evans at right during a food giveaway at 52nd and Girard. Friday, June 5, 2020
STEVEN M. FALK / Staff Photographer
Basimah McNeal, left, picks up a food bag from Chef Elijah Milligan, with help from Stephanie Willis and Kurt Evans at right during a food giveaway at 52nd and Girard. Friday, June 5, 2020

About 40 volunteers, led by chefs Elijah Milligan and Stephanie Willis, hosted a giveaway of food and supplies Friday afternoon to neighbors at 52nd Street and Girard Avenue, near the site of violent protests earlier this week.

The chefs, backed by Aziza Young, Kurt Evans, and Omar Tate, served about 600 bagged lunches and handed out produce bags, perishables, water, and baby and adult hygienic products.

They hope to reprise the giveaway elsewhere in the city.

— Mike Klein

7:02 PM - June 5, 2020
7:02 PM - June 5, 2020

Photos: Protesters march in the rain

Protestors march back towards city hall as rain pours over them on Friday, June 5, 2020.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Protestors march back towards city hall as rain pours over them on Friday, June 5, 2020.
Jomo Atkins, 48, of Chester, Pa., speaks in front of protestors and letting his voice be heard as Police Officers and National Guard stand behind him on Friday, June 5, 2020.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Jomo Atkins, 48, of Chester, Pa., speaks in front of protestors and letting his voice be heard as Police Officers and National Guard stand behind him on Friday, June 5, 2020.
Protestors march back towards city hall as rain pours over them on Friday, June 5, 2020.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Protestors march back towards city hall as rain pours over them on Friday, June 5, 2020.

— Tyger Williams

6:11 PM - June 5, 2020
6:11 PM - June 5, 2020

Philly announces street closures for Saturday protests

The city has announced street closures and mass transit plans in anticipation of large crowds converging on Philadelphia for protests on Saturday.

Starting 11 a.m., most of Center City will be closed to traffic, from river to river and from South Street to Callowhill Street.

The Vine Street Expressway will closed in both direction from I-76 to I-95.

Starting at 5 a.m., the Benjamin Franklin Parkway will be closed from 22nd Street to the Art Museum.

SEPTA buses will be detoured from Center City and the Parkway. Check septa.org for affected bus routes. The Broad Street Line and Market Frankford Line will continue to run.

The Ben Franklin Bridge is expected to remain open and PATCO will run a normal schedule.

For updates, follow the city’s Office of Emergency Management on Twitter at @PhilaOEM.

— Robert Moran

5:57 PM - June 5, 2020
5:57 PM - June 5, 2020

Photos: Protesters honor Breonna Taylor

A protester holds a sign reading, “Happy Birthday Breonna Taylor” as they march back to city hall on Friday, June 5, 2020. Today would be Breonna Taylor’s birthday if she hadn't been shot and killed by Louisville Metro Police Officers.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
A protester holds a sign reading, “Happy Birthday Breonna Taylor” as they march back to city hall on Friday, June 5, 2020. Today would be Breonna Taylor’s birthday if she hadn't been shot and killed by Louisville Metro Police Officers.
A protester holds sign for Breonna Taylor letting people know that today would be her birthday if she were alive during a protest at city hall on Friday, June 5, 2020.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
A protester holds sign for Breonna Taylor letting people know that today would be her birthday if she were alive during a protest at city hall on Friday, June 5, 2020.
Medical workers and protesters gather in front of city hall kneeling with their hands up as they shout the names of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor on Friday, June 5, 2020.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Medical workers and protesters gather in front of city hall kneeling with their hands up as they shout the names of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor on Friday, June 5, 2020.

— Tyger Williams

5:28 PM - June 5, 2020
5:28 PM - June 5, 2020

Frank Rizzo mural in the Italian Market to be removed this weekend

The Rizzo mural at the Italian Market was found vandalized on Wednesday morning. Early Wednesday morning, the Frank Rizzo statue was removed from in front of the Municipal Services Building
Jodie Eichel
The Rizzo mural at the Italian Market was found vandalized on Wednesday morning. Early Wednesday morning, the Frank Rizzo statue was removed from in front of the Municipal Services Building

The controversial and currently defaced Frank Rizzo mural in the Italian Market will be removed overnight this weekend.

David Neukirch, the owner of the pizzeria on the Ninth Street property that is home to the mural, said late Friday afternoon that the mural will be removed around 1 a.m. Sunday.

The mural of Rizzo, the city’s former mayor and police commissioner, has stood in the Italian Market for nearly 25 years.

Neukirch said local artists at some point will be working on a replacement “that best represents us as a whole.”

— Wendy Ruderman

5:04 PM - June 5, 2020
5:04 PM - June 5, 2020

Philadelphia police inspector accused of beating a Temple student during protest expected to face aggravated assault charges

Police sources say a baton-wielding officer who was captured on video beating a Temple University student is a high-ranking member of the force, Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna. He's pictured at the protest on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Tyger Williams / Staff photographer
Police sources say a baton-wielding officer who was captured on video beating a Temple University student is a high-ranking member of the force, Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna. He's pictured at the protest on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

A high-ranking Philadelphia police officer has been removed from the street after video surfaced of him beating a Temple University student with a baton, including near his head, during a Monday protest by the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.

Other video clips of Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna show similarly aggressive behavior over several days toward people protesting against oppressive policing.

One video shows Bologna on Sunday lunging at a TV reporter and striking a security guard. Another shows him on Tuesday throwing his bike and tackling a woman, immediately causing tensions to flare between police and protesters.

Now, Bologna is expected to be charged with aggravated assault and related offenses, law-enforcement sources said Friday.

— William Bender

4:53 PM - June 5, 2020
4:53 PM - June 5, 2020

Protesters stop at the Frank Rizzo mural

The protest march passing through the Italian Market stopped at the Frank Rizzo mural to decry racism and vow to continue to demonstrate.

“Until the city sees something wrong with this, we’re going to continue to march,” one speaker told the crowd kneeling in the parking lot next to the mural.

The owner of the pizza shop that has the mural said it will be painted over Saturday night.

— Wendy Ruderman

4:40 PM - June 5, 2020
4:40 PM - June 5, 2020

Protesters march to the Italian Market

A group of about 150 protesters who had been marching through Center City made a turn south along Broad Street and proceeded to Washington Avenue.

They turned east and headed to the Italian Market at Ninth Street where they kneeled for George Floyd.

Along Ninth Street, shoppers and market owners expressed support for the march.

— Stephanie Farr and Wendy Ruderman

4:25 PM - June 5, 2020
4:25 PM - June 5, 2020

Thousands of medical workers turn out to remember George Floyd and work for health equity

Medical staff observe silence for 8 minutes and 46 seconds at a demonstration to draw attention to systemic racism at 10th and Locust Streets on Friday.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Medical staff observe silence for 8 minutes and 46 seconds at a demonstration to draw attention to systemic racism at 10th and Locust Streets on Friday.

Doctors, nurses and medical students gathered across the Philadelphia region and around the country Friday to honor the memory of George Floyd by vowing to ensure racial justice and equity in health care.

Dubbed “White Coats for Black Lives,” the events — at which participants wore not only white coats but also medical scrubs of every color — drew thousands from Penn Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Temple University, the Virtua system in New Jersey, the Jefferson system and many more.

The hundreds of health professionals massed at the heart of Thomas Jefferson University on Friday afternoon voiced a truth often left unspoken: That the outcomes of systemic racism appear in hospitals every day in black patients who fare worse than white patients when being treated for diabetes, cancer, hypertension, and a host of other illnesses. The past three months of pandemic have only made more obvious how the stress of racism, along with greater poverty and disadvantages in education, jobs and housing have left black Americans suffering disproportionately. The coronavirus-related death rates among black Philadelphians are about 30% higher than for the city’s white population.

— Jason Laughlin, Erin McCarthy

3:36 PM - June 5, 2020
3:36 PM - June 5, 2020

Outlaw says National Guard will stay; Kenney vows to “deconstruct this broken system” regarding racism

Pennsylvania National Guard walking along Kensington Avenue in Philadelphia on Thursday.
Staff Photographer
Pennsylvania National Guard walking along Kensington Avenue in Philadelphia on Thursday.

The National Guard will remain in Philadelphia “as long as we need them,” Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said Friday as a press briefing.

“We’re not out of the woods yet, in that we don’t have a clear end date as to when this activity will cease,” she said. “I think it’s a very good indication that most of these activities have been peaceful but we still see that there’s looting." Outlaw said the police will continue to take the situation “day by day.”

At the same briefing, Mayor Jim Kenney vowed that his administration will “deconstruct this broken system” and confront systemic racism in Philadelphia.

Kenney, wearing an orange tie in honor of gun violence awareness day, said he will also continue working against gun violence in the city. Nearly 170 people have died from violence in Philadelphia so far this year, Kenney said, and “many were only teenagers when they were taken from us.”

Kenney acknowledged that his removal of the statue of former mayor Frank Rizzo this week was a “symbolic action,” and more must be done to confront racism in Philadelphia. Kenney also announced a steering committee Thursday to work toward reconciliation.

“To our black communities here at home and around the country, we hear you, we are listening to you and we feel the pain you share with us,” Kenney said. “We recognize the long history of institutional racism that has brought us to this moment. It is the reason peaceful protesters take to the street and we stand with them 100%.”

Laura McCrystal

3:02 PM - June 5, 2020
3:02 PM - June 5, 2020

More than 700 arrests so far in week of protests

Philadelphia police have arrested 759 people since Saturday, Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said Friday afternoon.

That number represents an increase of only four arrests since Thursday afternoon.

Protesters were “almost entirely peaceful" Thursday, Outlaw said.

“We will continue to safeguard the peaceful expression of constitutional guarantees,” she said.

The 759 arrests include 492 for code violations, 15 for assault on police, 231 for looting or burglary, 13 for theft, four for firearms violations, and one each for rioting, propulsion of a missile, vandalism, and aggravated assault. Commercial burglaries in the past week have increased significantly compared to the typical number reported, Outlaw said.

There were 29 reported on Saturday, 247 on Sunday, and 411 on Monday. The numbers reported each day this week have decreased since Monday, with 47 reported Thursday.

“For comparison, last Friday there were three commercial burglaries reported,” Outlaw said.

Outlaw said 27 officers have been injured since Saturday, and one remains in the hospital.

Laura McCrystal

2:52 PM - June 5, 2020
2:52 PM - June 5, 2020

Hundreds of doctors, civilians gather outside of City Hall, with National Guard as backdrop

Medical workers and protesters kneel in front of City Hall shouting the names of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor on Friday June 5, 2020.
Tyger Williams / Staff photographer
Medical workers and protesters kneel in front of City Hall shouting the names of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor on Friday June 5, 2020.

About 400 civilians and doctors in white coats gathered to protest and chant at City Hall Friday against the killing of George Floyd and police brutality Friday afternoon.

One black woman doctor held up a sign that read “Am I essential?”

After about 30 minutes, part of the group broke off and marched down the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where speakers took to the stairs, including Jordan Holbert, 28.

“The people benefiting from white supremacy are terrified,” he said. “We have to come out here day in and day out and we have to continue to protest. We have to step on them the way they step on us. Then maybe our kids won’t have to do this.”

Afterwards, Holbert said he hadn’t planned on speaking Friday but “As a black man in America, I’ve had 28 years of preparation for this.”

Meanwhile, National Guard troops stood behind barricades nearby.

The crowd grew so large two different chants broke out simultaneously. “George Floyd — I can’t breathe.” “No justice — no peace.”

Stephanie Farr

2:35 PM - June 5, 2020
2:35 PM - June 5, 2020

Potentially dangerous chemical and oxygen tanks stolen from Philly business

Philadelphia police are looking for three men who they believe broke into a business Thursday morning and stole oxygen and chemical tanks, Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said Friday.

“The tanks have not yet been recovered and are extremely dangerous in the hands of criminal actors and reckless or untrained persons,” Outlaw said.

Police said they are reviewing video from security cameras that shows three men cutting a hole in the fence of the business on Church Street in Northeast Philadelphia. The tanks of oxygen and acetylene are typically used for welding, police said.

Outlaw said the incident is troubling because they could be used in a dangerous way.

“If intended to be used in the way that we think, that completely goes counter against the peaceful demonstrations that are planned for tomorrow,” Outlaw said.

Outlaw said she expects thousands of protesters to march at the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Saturday, and believes the crowd will be larger than last weekend, when about 3,000 people filled the area around the museum.

Laura McCrystal

2:21 PM - June 5, 2020
2:21 PM - June 5, 2020

Philly police commissioner Outlaw launches internal affairs investigations over use of force

Philly Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw speaks during a press conference last weekend.
MONICA HERNDON / Staff Photographer
Philly Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw speaks during a press conference last weekend.

Philadelphia Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw has launched several internal affairs investigations into use of force by police officers during protests this week, she said Friday.

“I assure you that each of these investigations will be conducted in a thorough manner,” she said.

Outlaw said that some of the investigations had been launched in response to videos circulating on social media depicting the use of force.

“Some of the images are disturbing and depict behavior that does not appear to be in accord with our policy,” she said.

Outlaw said that officers involved will be removed from their assignments if deemed necessary, as was done with Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna, captured on video beating a Temple University student.

Laura McCrystal

2:03 PM - June 5, 2020
2:03 PM - June 5, 2020

Minneapolis bans police chokeholds in wake of George Floyd death

Negotiators for the city of Minneapolis agreed with the state Friday to ban the use of chokeholds by police and to require officers to report and intervene anytime they see an unauthorized use of force by another officer.

The changes are part of a stipulation posted online between the city and the Minnesota Department of Human Rights, which launched a civil rights investigation this week in response to the death of George Floyd. The City Council was expected to approve the agreement Friday.

The agreement would require court approval and would become enforceable in court, unlike the department’s current policies on the use of force and duties to intervene. The agreement would require any officer, regardless of tenure or rank, to immediately radio or phone in from the scene the use of any neck restraint or chokehold to their commander or their commander’s superiors.

Similarly, any officer who sees another officer commit any unauthorized use of force, including any chokehold or neck restraint, must try to intervene verbally and even physically. If they don’t, they’d be subject to discipline as severe as if they themselves had used the prohibited force.

— The Associated Press

1:58 PM - June 5, 2020
1:58 PM - June 5, 2020

Hundreds of Muslims gather at City Hall in prayer

Muslims in the community gather on the south side of city hall joining in prayer in support for Black Lives Matter on Friday, June 5, 2020.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Muslims in the community gather on the south side of city hall joining in prayer in support for Black Lives Matter on Friday, June 5, 2020.

About 200 Muslims gathered on the south side of City Hall Friday afternoon for a prayer service to honor George Floyd, who died May 25 after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck.

“As Muslims, we couldn’t even kill an animal that way,” said Tahir Wyatt of the United Muslims Movement.

"Allah didn’t create us differently so we can oppress each other,” Wyatt added, “he did it so we could get to know each other better.”

While they prayed, leaders of other faiths stood guard around the group to help keep the peace.

For many, it was the first time attending a Jummah prayer service in three months, and organizers encouraged them to practice social distancing. One women walked through the crowd squirting hand sanitizer in the hands of participants and observers.

Muslims in the community gather on the south side of city hall joining in prayer in support for Black Lives Matter on Friday, June 5, 2020.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Muslims in the community gather on the south side of city hall joining in prayer in support for Black Lives Matter on Friday, June 5, 2020.

Stephanie Farr

1:45 PM - June 5, 2020
1:45 PM - June 5, 2020

National Guard leaves West Chester

Pennsylvania National Guard troops being housed at West Chester University have left, according to Josh Maxwell, a Chester County Commissioner.

The troops had been serving Philadelphia. They had been staying at the school since Wednesday and were expected to remain for about seven days. The university was unoccupied and under social-distancing protocols, so it agreed to the request.

However, petitions began circulating asking for the troops’ removal. It’s not clear if that is why they were removed.

Frank Kummer

1:38 PM - June 5, 2020
1:38 PM - June 5, 2020

Thousands of health care professionals show solidarity with protesters at Franklin Field

Amid a sea of thousands of multicolored scrubs and white coats, Florencia Greer Polite gave the crowd at Franklin Field a warning: Prepare to be uncomfortable.

The scoreboard behind her was set to 8 minutes and 46 seconds, the amount of time that a white Minneapolis police officer knelt on the neck of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, as he died.

“Eight minutes and 46 seconds is a long time,” said Polite, Penn Medicine’s chief of general obstetrics and gynecology. “Today we are going to be uncomfortable. Our knees are going to be uncomfortable … But we’ve been comfortable for too long.”

Then, spread out on the turf and in the stands, they knelt. The stadium was silent except for the hum of University City traffic. Some held signs that read “White Coats for Black Lives.”

One woman with a baby on her chest held a small piece of cardboard with the words. “Show me that I am growing up in a world where black lives matter.”

Others raised fists.

Polite had asked the group, mostly doctors and nurses from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania health system, to use the quiet moments to reflect on steps they will take in the coming months and years to address racial inequality in healthcare and elsewhere.

“We have a duty to acknowledge the systemic racism that permeates our country affects the lives of black and brown patients,” Polite said. “What will you do when the media coverage goes away?”

When the scoreboard hit zero, they stood and filed out, many walking back to work at hospitals across the street. They chanted George Floyd’s name and “No justice, no peace.”

Passing drivers honked in support of the grassroots demonstration, which was supported by hospital and university administrators. Gilana Tahir, 30, who works in the child-life department at CHOP, wore two giant paper hearts on her chest and her back. The front read: “Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in healthcare is the most shocking and inhumane,” while the heart draped across her back read, “My black patients’ lives matter!”

She came out in honor of her “black kiddo patients,” she said. “They deserve the same treatment and the same level of healthcare as all of us do.”

In all, thousands of doctors and nurses from CHOP and Penn hospitals had filed onto Franklin Field.

Erin McCarthy

1:25 PM - June 5, 2020
1:25 PM - June 5, 2020

High-ranking officer seen in beating video taken off streets, under investigation

Police sources say that the baton-wielding officer captured on video beating a Temple University student is a high-ranking member of the force who has now been taken off the streets pending an investigation.

Police sources say a baton-wielding officer who was captured on video beating a Temple University student is a high-ranking member of the force, Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna. He's pictured at the protest on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Tyger Williams / Staff photograer
Police sources say a baton-wielding officer who was captured on video beating a Temple University student is a high-ranking member of the force, Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna. He's pictured at the protest on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna earns $126,339 a year, according to city payroll records. The sources said Bologna was taken off street duty Thursday evening after an Inquirer article was published.

He handed in his gun pending an investigation. He has not been charged with a crime or departmental violation.

— William Bender

12:55 PM - June 5, 2020
12:55 PM - June 5, 2020

Delco cop apologizes for threatening business owners on social media

A Delaware County police officer apologized for writing a heated social media post threatening business owners who speak out against cops.

In a post on the Facebook page of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 27 Wednesday, Media Police Sgt. Robert Carroll wrote: “If you choose to speak out against the police or our members, we will do everything in our power to not support your business.”

According to a Change.org petition, Carroll also shared the message on his own Facebook page and added, “Try us. We’ll destroy you.” Both posts appear to have been deleted, and Police Lodge 27 called the comments shared on its page “inappropriate.”

“This is a trying time for law enforcement," Carroll said in a statement. “Wednesday night I made a post that was poorly worded and interpreted by some as inciting violence. That was not my intention and I apologize to those who were offended.”

Upper Darby Township Police Superintendent Timothy Bernhardt criticized Carroll’s remarks in a statement, saying they were “in direct contradiction to the steps we have already taken, and will continue to take, to ensure professional and fair police service."

According to Carroll’s LinkedIn profile, he’s been a member of the Media Borough Police Department for more than 27 years, dating back to 1993.

- Rob Tornoe

12:30 PM - June 5, 2020
12:30 PM - June 5, 2020

Photos: Hundreds stages peaceful protest in Mount Airy

12:00 PM - June 5, 2020
12:00 PM - June 5, 2020

Officer who beat Temple student with a baton a high-ranking member of the force

Police sources say a baton-wielding officer who was captured on video beating a Temple University student is a high-ranking member of the force, Staff Inspector Joseph Bologna. He earns $126,339 a year, according to city payroll records.

Bologna could not immediately be reached for comment Friday morning.

Evan Gorski, a Temple University student arrested during protests Monday, was released from custody Wednesday after video surfaced of one police officer striking him in the head with a baton and another using his knee to pin the student’s face to the street.

Prosecutors dismissed the charges against Gorski, an engineering student, after viewing the YouTube and Twitter videos, according to his attorney, R. Emmett Madden.

— William Bender

11:50 AM - June 5, 2020
11:50 AM - June 5, 2020

‘I want the action to be legislative action’

Jamal Johnson, 63, of Germantown, has held his Stop Killing Us walk from Philly to D.C. for the last three years. He was moved to start to it when former Philadelphia Police Officer Ryan Pownall shot David Jones in the back as he ran away following a traffic stop in 2017. Johnson said it takes him three weeks to walk from Philly to D.C., where he will present a set of policing standards he wants passed to the Congressional Black Caucus.

Among the standards he calls for are an end to stop and frisk and greater police accountability.

“I’m hoping to have a little more leverage this year now that the country is behind the issue,” he said.

Johnson said people join him on his walk along the way, and he plans to join protests in the cities he marches through.

“I want the action to be legislative action,” he said. “Hopefully this will bet the year, but I’m going to keep doing it till it happens.”

— Stephanie Farr

11:14 AM - June 5, 2020
11:14 AM - June 5, 2020

Philly archbishop weighs in on George Floyd’s ‘unnecessary’ death

Archbishop Nelson J. Perez, seen here in April, called the death of George Floyd "unnecessary" and is calling on people to respond with prayer for healing.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Archbishop Nelson J. Perez, seen here in April, called the death of George Floyd "unnecessary" and is calling on people to respond with prayer for healing.

With public masses set to resume in the Philadelphia region this weekend due to the relaxation of coronavirus restrictions, Archbishop Nelson J. Perez calls on the clergy and the faithful to respond to George Floyd’s “unnecessary” death with prayer for healing.

Perez said in a statement that “racial hatred has no place in our wold.” Every Sunday in June, he asked pastors to include a special petition “for the eradication of all forms of racism among all peoples.

Perez said there is no doubt the country and region has been “shaken to its core” by Floyd’s death. He added, “Frankly we should never be the same when it comes to acts of violent racism ... This can never happen again.”

Despite all the stresses of this time, Perez said “it is now a time to breathe in hope.” He applauded peaceful protesters and said vandalism and looting “never should’ve happened.”

— Erin McCarthy

11:05 AM - June 5, 2020
11:05 AM - June 5, 2020

City Council unveils $25 million “New Normal Budget Act” to address racial inequities, but provides few details

City Council members on Friday unveiled a plan, called the “New Normal Budget Act,” to spend $25 million to address racial inequalities in housing, food security, policing and other issues, but provided no details on how the money will be spent.

“People are hurting. What you’re seeing in the streets reflects an unemployment rate” for African-Americans that has been exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic, Council President Darrell L. Clarke said at a news conference outside City Hall. “You wonder why people are acting in a very desperate manner? Because these are desperate times for them. And guess what. This is not new for them.”

Clarke said the legislation will help create a “new normal” once the pandemic and civic unrest over the death of George Floyd subsides that will address underlying inequalities illuminated by those crises.

“The lack of access to affordable housing, health care, living wage jobs and healthy foods has been exposed by these crises,” he said in a statement. “We cannot go back to that old normal.”

The legislation, an amendment to Mayor Jim Kenney’s proposed budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, takes the money from the city’s recession reserve and, as it is written for the moment, places it in Council’s budget. Later, Council will edit the amendment to direct the money to specific city agencies, said Clarke’s spokesperson Joe Grace.

Typically, recession reserves are used to sustain existing spending needs when revenues dip during an economic downturn, like the one caused by the coronavirus pandemic that has blown a projected $649 million hole in next year’s budget. The planned legislation, however, will direct it to new spending priorities.

— Sean Walsh

10:20 AM - June 5, 2020
10:20 AM - June 5, 2020

Fauci: Massive protests the ‘perfect setup’ to spread coronavirus

Hundreds of protesters take a knee in front of the police and the National Guard (not pictured) outside of City Hall in Philadelphia on Wednesday, June 03, 2020. It was the fifth day of protests against the killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
Hundreds of protesters take a knee in front of the police and the National Guard (not pictured) outside of City Hall in Philadelphia on Wednesday, June 03, 2020. It was the fifth day of protests against the killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police.

Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, warns that large protests and marches occurring in Philadelphia and cities across the country could leak to a spike in coronavirus cases

“It’s a perfect set-up for further spread of the virus in the sense of creating these blips that might turn into some surges,” Fauci said during an interview on WTOP in Washington, D.C. Friday. “What it’s going to be leading to is a likelihood that you might have situations where you force the spread of infection.”

Fauci said he wasn’t criticizing protesters, but simply pointing out people typically stand close together and yell during protests, actions that help spread the virus. He encouraged anyone protesting to wear a mask and keep it on for the duration of their demonstrations.

“It’s a delicate balance, because the reason for demonstrating are valid. But the demonstration itself puts a person at additional risk,” Fauci said.

— Rob Tornoe

10:00 AM - June 5, 2020
10:00 AM - June 5, 2020

Philadelphia under curfew again Friday night

Police lead a handcuffed person into a Sheriff’s Office bus after detaining a group of about a dozen individuals in front of the Community College of Philadelphia around 9 p.m. on Monday, June 1, 2020. The city instituted a 6 p.m. curfew after weekend protests against the Minneapolis police custody death of George Floyd evolved into looting and widespread property damage.
File Photograph
Police lead a handcuffed person into a Sheriff’s Office bus after detaining a group of about a dozen individuals in front of the Community College of Philadelphia around 9 p.m. on Monday, June 1, 2020. The city instituted a 6 p.m. curfew after weekend protests against the Minneapolis police custody death of George Floyd evolved into looting and widespread property damage.

Philadelphia will be under curfew again Friday night.

The curfew begins tonight at 8 p.m. and will remain in effect until 6 a.m. Saturday morning. During that time, people may leave their homes only to go to work at essential businesses or to seek medical attention or police assistance.

It will be the seventh straight night the city will be under curfew since protests broke out against police brutality in Philadelphia on Saturday.

— Rob Tornoe

9:40 AM - June 5, 2020
9:40 AM - June 5, 2020

Protesters to march from Narberth to Ardmore

Protesters in Montgomery County are preparing to silently march from Narberth to Ardmore, where they plan to pass the Lower Merion School District’s administrative offices on their way to the Lower Merion Township Building.

Organizers say the protest is calling for justice for Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, and “for our kids and our community.”

— Rob Tornoe

9:15 AM - June 5, 2020
9:15 AM - June 5, 2020

Man arrested in burglary attempt at South Philly gun store where one suspect was killed

Philadelphia police investigate a report of gun shop owner Firing Line on Front at Greenwich St. on Tuesday morning June 2, 2020.
ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ / Staff Photographer
Philadelphia police investigate a report of gun shop owner Firing Line on Front at Greenwich St. on Tuesday morning June 2, 2020.

Police have charged a man suspected as part of a four-person burglary attempt of a South Philly gun store, which ended with one would-be robber being shot and killed by the store’s owner.

District Attorney Larry Krasner said Khaleef Brown, 17, was part of the group that broke into Firing Line Inc. on the 1500 block of South Front Street early Tuesday morning, attempting to steal a large amount of firearms and ammunition.

Gregory Isabella, the store’s owner, was spending the night in his shop after previous break-in attempts. According to Krasner, the men — one of whom was seen on video carrying a handgun — breached the door and proceeded up a staircase to the second-floor business.

Krasner said Isabella fired three times, striking and immediately killing the suspect carrying the gun, and striking Khaleef Brown in the shoulder. The suspected burglar who was killed has not been identified, and the three others fled the scene.

Gun store owner Greg Isabella, 67, fired and killed burglar at his S. Philadelphia gun shop. Philadelphia police are investigating this shooting by the gun shop owner of Firing Line Inc on Front at Greenwich St. in South Philadelphia on Tuesday morning June 2, 2020.
ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ / Staff Photographer
Gun store owner Greg Isabella, 67, fired and killed burglar at his S. Philadelphia gun shop. Philadelphia police are investigating this shooting by the gun shop owner of Firing Line Inc on Front at Greenwich St. in South Philadelphia on Tuesday morning June 2, 2020.

Krasner said Brown, whose gunshot was was treated at the Jefferson University Emergency Room, was connected to crime by “overwhelming evidence of different types.” Brown faces several charges, including robbery, burglary, conspiracy, and obstruction of justice.

"The facts we know and the law are clear that the business owner’s use of force while inside his own property against a burglar accompanied by others who was entering with a gun in his hand was justified,” Krasner said in a statement. “It is fortunate for the City of Philadelphia that this large cache of guns and ammunitions were not taken and sold on the street.”

— Rob Tornoe

8:00 AM - June 5, 2020
8:00 AM - June 5, 2020

Norristown superintendent calls teacher’s comments ‘racist’ and ‘deplorable’

A Norristown Area High School teacher is under fire for a Facebook post describing George Floyd as a “career criminal” and complaining about Western nations being forced to “diversify.”

In the post, which has since been deleted, the teacher said those who think the only difference between races is the color of their skin are “prey to the media-run state” and that white people should be celebrated for ending slavery.

The teacher also cited James Watson, a Nobel Prize-winning DNA scientist who was ostracized by the scientific community after baselessly claiming people in Africa don’t share the same level of intelligence as their Western counterparts.

Norristown Area School District Superintendent Christopher Dormer called the comments in the Facebook post “racist” and “deplorable,” and said the district will take “swift and appropriate action.”

“We are appalled that any person would subscribe to these types of thoughts, and it is heartbreaking that in this case, that person is a District employee, responsible for educating our students,” Dormer said in a statement. “I want to assure out African-American students in particular that we see you and we hear you. Black Lives Matter, and we will not tolerate this behavior.”

The teacher, who was not identified in Dormer’s statement, could not be immediately reached for comment.

— Rob Tornoe

7:00 AM - June 5, 2020
7:00 AM - June 5, 2020

More protests planned in and around Philly today

Protestor Iris Bowen raises her fist, front center, along with with many other protestors gathered at the Philadelphia Museum of Arts steps, in remembrance of George Floyd.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Protestor Iris Bowen raises her fist, front center, along with with many other protestors gathered at the Philadelphia Museum of Arts steps, in remembrance of George Floyd.

Demonstrators will protest police brutality and the death of George Floyd for the seventh straight day in Philadelphia on Friday. Among the events planned

At 10 a.m., marchers are expected to make their way from Upsal Station in Mt. Airy down to the intersection of Cresheim Valley Avenue and Germantown Avenue.

At 11 a.m., demonstrators plan to assemble at Philadelphia Police Department headquarters on Race Street, and will make their way all the way down to Washington, D.C. as part of the fourth annual “Stop Killing Us” march.

At 12:30 p.m., Health care workers and medical students plan to kneel at the now-shuttered Hahnemann University Hospital in Center City and walk to Temple.

At 1 p.m., Muslims in the city plan to gather for a group prayer on the south side of City Hall. Participants are asked to bring their own prayer rug and maintain social distancing.

A demonstration in Collingswood, N.J. scheduled for this afternoon has been moved to Monday at 4 p.m. because of the threat of rain.

— Rob Tornoe

6:30 AM - June 5, 2020
6:30 AM - June 5, 2020

Officials offer proposed reforms in response to protests

Protesters lying silently on the ground at the Philadelphia Art Museum for 8 minutes and 46 seconds, the amount of time a Minnesota police officer knelt on George Floyd's neck.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Protesters lying silently on the ground at the Philadelphia Art Museum for 8 minutes and 46 seconds, the amount of time a Minnesota police officer knelt on George Floyd's neck.

On the sixth day of protests against police brutality and racial injustice in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death, Philadelphia marchers demanded a set of police reforms, and state and local officials offered their most concrete responses yet to the demonstrations.

Mayor Jim Kenney said the city had heard their “cries of anguish” and vowed “to do better," while Gov. Tom Wolf said he would push for legislative police reform and establish a commission to investigate alleged misconduct by the Pennsylvania State Police and other law enforcement agencies under his purview.

In Philadelphia, protesters presented their most unified front yet as they marched from the Art Museum to Independence Mall and back again on another hot day. The marches, like those the two previous days, were peaceful. Police Commissioner Daniel Outlaw said 755 people had been arrested since Saturday, 492 of which were code violations for curfew.

Saying the voices of the thousands of protesters who have taken to the streets every day since Saturday had “led us to this point,” Kenney announced he would form a steering committee to help the city move toward reconciliation with residents. He and Commissioner Outlaw announced they were taking a pledge to address police use-of-force policies in Philadelphia.

— Justine McDaniel, Oona Goodin-Smith, Laura McCrystal and Samantha Melamed

6:00 AM - June 5, 2020
6:00 AM - June 5, 2020

Front page of Friday’s Philadelphia Inquirer

The front page of the Philadelphia Inquirer for Friday, June 5, 2020.
Philadelphia Inquirer
The front page of the Philadelphia Inquirer for Friday, June 5, 2020.