12:07 PM - October 30, 2020
12:07 PM - October 30, 2020

Latest updates: Walter Wallace Jr.'s family calls for systemic reform, National Guard arrives in Philly

The family of Walter Wallace Jr. is calling for systemic reform, and the National Guard and Pennsylvania State Police have both arrived in Philadelphia after two days after of few protests and little unrest. Follow along here for the latest.

10:57 PM - October 29, 2020
10:57 PM - October 29, 2020

Recap: Wallace family reviews body-cam video of his fatal shooting by police

Pennsylvania State Troopers arrive by a SEPTA bus at the City Hall/Love Park area on Oct. 29, 2020.
CHARLES FOX / Staff Photographer
Pennsylvania State Troopers arrive by a SEPTA bus at the City Hall/Love Park area on Oct. 29, 2020.

There were no reports of major unrest on a cold and rainy Thursday in Philadelphia as the city prepared for the arrival of the Pennsylvania National Guard to provide additional security amid the aftermath of the fatal police shooting of Walter Wallace Jr.

Wallace’s family earlier in the day reviewed video from body cameras worn by the officers who shot him on Monday and a family lawyer said the footage was brief but showed Wallace “in obvious mental health crisis” before being shot at 14 times by two officers.

In a statement late Thursday, the Mayor’s Office and the District Attorney’s Office said they expected the materials to be released by the end of next week.

The family’s meeting with Police Department leaders came during a week marked by ongoing tension over the shooting and its fallout. Demonstrations that coursed through the city on Monday and Tuesday night — some of which police said coincided with looting and clashes with officers — were much quieter Wednesday. Mayor Jim Kenney had imposed a 9 p.m. curfew; he chose not to renew it Thursday.

Still, officials were preparing for the possibility of unrest over the weekend, including at protests expected Saturday. National guardsmen were scheduled to arrive in the city by Friday, and officials have said they might remain in place until after Tuesday’s election, which has its own possibility of leading to turmoil.

Read more of our coverage of today’s events:

10:24 PM - October 29, 2020
10:24 PM - October 29, 2020

2 men accused of using cover of protests to bomb ATMs in Philly

Two men were charged with possessing illegal explosives to possibly use on ATMs while police were busy responding to unrest on Wednesday night in Philadelphia, state Attorney General Josh Shapiro said.

Brian Larue and Eric Murray were traveling in a van when they were arrested in the area of 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Shapiro said investigators found “quarter or half sticks of dynamite,” a handheld propane tank torch, a taser and various tools including: electric drills, bolt cutters, and machetes.

Shapiro said that such items are commonly used to attempt to dismantle and steal proceeds from ATMs. There have been at least thirty ATM bombings in Philadelphia in the last four days, he said.

“These individuals who have been charged today tried to use a message of justice to provide cover for their own gain,” Shapiro said in a statement. “This is an incredibly challenging time for communities in Philadelphia, across Southeast Pennsylvania, and around the country. We will not allow criminals to hijack, and take advantage of, lawful protests as an opportunity to sow chaos.”

Murray and Larue both were charged with possession of weapons of mass destruction, conspiracy, and risking a catastrophe, along with several misdemeanor charges, Shapiro said. The investigation was ongoing.

— Robert Moran

9:46 PM - October 29, 2020
9:46 PM - October 29, 2020

Pa. State Police arrives in Center City

Pennsylvania State Troopers arrive at the City Hall area on Oct. 29, 2020. The unrest was sparked by the fatal shooting of Walter Wallace, Jr. by police earlier in the week.
CHARLES FOX / Staff Photographer
Pennsylvania State Troopers arrive at the City Hall area on Oct. 29, 2020. The unrest was sparked by the fatal shooting of Walter Wallace, Jr. by police earlier in the week.
Just after 9 pm, PA State Troopers march into the Municipal Services Building Phila., Pa. on Oct. 29, 2020. Their presence in the city is the result of unrest after Walter Wallace Jr. was shot and killed by Phila. police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.
ELIZABETH ROBERTSON / Staff Photographer
Just after 9 pm, PA State Troopers march into the Municipal Services Building Phila., Pa. on Oct. 29, 2020. Their presence in the city is the result of unrest after Walter Wallace Jr. was shot and killed by Phila. police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.
9:26 PM - October 29, 2020
9:26 PM - October 29, 2020

Planned traffic closures in Center City now in effect

A large portion of Center City was shut down to vehicle traffic Thursday night for a “planned initiative” and there were no reports of protests or other unrest.

The city has not said why streets were being closed, but the Pennsylvania National Guard was expected to arrive in the city on Friday and that could occur soon after midnight, or possibly sooner.

The Center City District reported in an alert that traffic was closed between Eighth and 20th Streets and between Arch and Walnut Streets.

Residents, public transportation, nurses, and doctors are being allowed through, the Center City District said.

— Robert Moran

9:04 PM - October 29, 2020
9:04 PM - October 29, 2020

Philly expected to release bodycam video at end of next week, Mayor’s Office says

The bodycam video from the officers who fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr. is expected to be released “by the end of next week” after legal and other matters are resolved, the Mayor’s Office said in a statement Thursday night.

“The Mayor, Police Commissioner, and District Attorney are in close communication about the specifics of when and how police Body-Worn Camera (BWC) footage and 911 audio files in relation to the killing of Walter Wallace, Jr., will be released," Mayor Jim Kenney’s office said.

"The Administration and the District Attorney expect BWC footage and 911 audio files to be released by the end of next week after certain matters are resolved in close consultation with Mr. Wallace’s family and their legal counsel,” Kenney’s office said.

Wallace’s family reviewed the video with Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw earlier on Thursday and then appeared at a news conference in the afternoon in which family attorney Shaka Johnson described what they saw.

— Robert Moran

8:16 PM - October 29, 2020
8:16 PM - October 29, 2020

‘I know everyone will view this video with a different lens’: Wallace family lawyer on bodycam video

— Lauren Schneiderman

5:56 PM - October 29, 2020
5:56 PM - October 29, 2020

Photos and video: Looking back at a week of protests after police fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr.

— Inquirer Staff Photographers

5:26 PM - October 29, 2020
5:26 PM - October 29, 2020

Funeral set for Walter Wallace Jr.

The funeral for Walter Wallace Jr. has been set for Nov. 7 at the Church of Christian Compassion in West Philadelphia.

Viewing is scheduled to start at 9 a.m. at the church, which is located at 6121 Cedar Ave., with the service beginning at 11 a.m.

— Mensah M. Dean

5:20 PM - October 29, 2020
5:20 PM - October 29, 2020

No curfew in Philly for Thursday night

There will be no curfew in Philadelphia for Thursday night but Mayor Jim Kenney and Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw urged residents to remain at home unless travel is absolutely necessary, such as for work.

The city also reported that there were 40 arrests from Wednesday night into early Thursday morning related to civil unrest, including four for assaulting police officers, five for curfew violations, 29 for burglaries, and two for stolen automobiles.

Four officers were injured overnight and have been treated and released. The city said one police vehicle was damaged and 11 incidents of explosions at ATMs.

Since Monday, there have been a total 212 arrests and 57 officers injured. One of the officers remains hospitalized. A total of 18 police and fire department vehicles have been damaged.

— Robert Moran

5:04 PM - October 29, 2020
5:04 PM - October 29, 2020

Video: Wallace’s father speaks at news conference

4:55 PM - October 29, 2020
4:55 PM - October 29, 2020

Wallace’s parents speak out after viewing body-cam video of his death

The parents of Walter Wallace Jr. spoke at a news conference Thursday afternoon after viewing body-cam video of the fatal police shooting of their son.

“I would like to see justice for my son,” his father said, who said he is “traumatized.”

“Everybody deserves life,” he said.

“I would like to see justice done for what they did to my son,” said Wallace Jr.'s mother, Kathy Brant.

“I wouldn’t wish this on no one’s child at all. It just hurts me so bad to see how what is in the world I pray things change I pray we all one day can come together and get along. This got to stop it really got to stop it really do,” she said.

— Ellie Silverman

4:49 PM - October 29, 2020
4:49 PM - October 29, 2020

Video: Wallace family attorney describes body-cam video

4:17 PM - October 29, 2020
4:17 PM - October 29, 2020

Wallace family attorney describes body-cam video of fatal police shooting

The attorney for Walter Wallace Jr.'s family said at a news conference Thursday afternoon outside City Hall that the family supports releasing the police body-cam video to the public and wishes it was made available sooner.

Shaka Johnson said the footage shows “a person in obvious mental health crisis.”

He said the video was short and you can hear the family shouting “He’s mental! He’s mental!” as Wallace comes out of the house.

The two officers can be heard telling him to drop the knife.

“You will not see a man with a knife lunging at anyone that would qualify as a reason to assassinate him in front of his family,” Johnson said.

“What you will hear from one of the officers is ‘shoot him,’” Johnson said.

The city has failed Wallace’s family, his community, and the officers, Johnson said.

Wallace comes out of the house and he seemed like a person “in a cloud or a stupor,” Johnson said. Then, he said, “it’s a lot of commotion and chaos.”

When the family called 911, they asked for “the entire buffet of services,” Johnson said. But there was “absolutely not” de-escalation efforts from officers who arrived on the scene, he said. “It was a panic. It was instant panic from those officers,” he said.

Family members met with Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw to review the video, Johnson said.

Outlaw has pledged to publicly release the police videos of the killing, as well as audio of the 911 calls, after the family had reviewed them.

Neither the Police Department nor the Mayor’s Office would say Thursday when the materials would be released.

The department also has not yet identified the two officers who shot at Wallace.

— Ellie Silverman

3:46 PM - October 29, 2020
3:46 PM - October 29, 2020

Penn, Haverford students protest administration responses to Wallace killing

Students at Haverford College and the University of Pennsylvania protested their institutions' messages on the fatal police shooting of Walter Wallace Jr., calling them tone deaf, according to student newspapers at both schools.

At Haverford College, President Wendy Raymond and the dean of the college in an email to the campus told students not to go to Philadelphia to participate in the protests.

“Our fear is that for every righteous protestor in the street, there are other actors afoot; we have seen this across the nation far too often, in cities large and small, in college towns and urban centers,” they wrote.

Hundreds protested on Founders Green on Haverford’s campus and then held a march, according to The Clerk, Haverford’s student newspaper.

“That the college, in their first formal statement on the matter, focused not on Wallace’s murder but instead policing the student response stoked further anger,” the newspaper wrote.

Haverford officials, according to the paper, later followed up with another email emphasizing that they were not trying to suppress students' rights to protest but were concerned about their safety.

At Penn, students complained that the university’s message referred to Wallace’s death but didn’t mention police, according to the Daily Pennsylvanian.

“His death is a tragedy on so many levels, and a stark reminder of the life and death struggles faced by so many Black Philadelphians,” Penn president Amy Gutmann, provost Wendell Pritchett, and executive vice president Craig Carnaroli wrote to the campus Wednesday. “…Walter Wallace’s death is particularly hard for all of us at Penn, because it occurred in our West Philadelphia community. He was our neighbor. And his loss is felt profoundly."

”College senior Landry Krebs called it “a passive way of talking about state-sanctioned terrorism,” according to the student newspaper.

— Susan Snyder

3:23 PM - October 29, 2020
3:23 PM - October 29, 2020

Philly councilmember says Wallace killing brought to light challenges for parents with special needs children

Philadelphia City Councilmember Derek Green said Thursday that Walter Wallace Jr. reminded him of his own son, who has autism.

Green, speaking emotionally about the police killing of Wallace during Thursday’s Council meeting, said the shooting “brought light to some of the challenges that parents that have children with special needs deal with.”

Wallace’s family said he struggled with mental-health issues and said they had been trying to call an ambulance when two police officers arrived and shot him.

Many Black parents are familiar with “the talk,” Green said, in which they explain a history of police brutality and racism and tell their children how to respond if stopped by an officer. But Green said he is not able to have that conversation with his own son.

Instead, he said, his son carries in his backpack a card explaining his autism and listing his parents' phone numbers. His wife also carries a similar card in her car, Green said.

“These are things I normally don’t share with people but we actually have a card or a notice that talks about my son, talks about that he’s autistic and that he’s nonthreatening and he may be dealing with an issue or an episode,” he said. “And this is just a very tragic week and this brings to mention the resources that we need to provide for mental health.”

— Laura McCrystal

2:41 PM - October 29, 2020
2:41 PM - October 29, 2020

City Council to vote on formal apology for the MOVE bombing, linking it to Walter Wallace Jr.'s killing

FILE PHOTO: The scene at the corner of 62nd and Larchwood in Philadelphia, in the afternoon following the dropping of bomb on MOVE headquarters, May 13, 1985.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
FILE PHOTO: The scene at the corner of 62nd and Larchwood in Philadelphia, in the afternoon following the dropping of bomb on MOVE headquarters, May 13, 1985.

Linking the 1985 MOVE bombing to Monday’s police killing of Walter Wallace Jr., Councilmember Jamie Gauthier called Thursday for a formal apology for the bombing and an annual day of “observation, reflection and recommitment.”

Gauthier, who took office this year and represents West Philadelphia, introduced a resolution Thursday calling for a formal apology for the MOVE bombing. The bombing killed 11 people and burned down 61 homes on May 13, 1985. The city has never apologized for it.

“We can draw a straight line from the unresolved pain and trauma of that day to Walter Wallace Jr.'s killing earlier this week in the very same neighborhood,” Gauthier said. “Because what’s lying under the surface here is a lack of recognition of the humanity of Black people from law enforcement.”

Gauthier said the city must also examine what reconciliation would look like between the West Philadelphia community and law enforcement, including reforming police, examining how people are selected to become police officers, and changing their skill sets and how they interact with residents.

“If we had gone through the hard work of reconciliation after the MOVE bombing, maybe those officers would have seen in Walter Wallace as someone in need of a helping hand rather than a threat,” she said. “They would have seen him and realized he was someone’s son, father, husband, neighbor.”

Gauthier’s resolution for a formal apology on behalf of City Council is cosponsored by 10 of her colleagues. It is expected to be up for final passage as early as next week.

— Laura McCrystal

1:08 PM - October 29, 2020
1:08 PM - October 29, 2020

City Council approves ban on use of tear gas, rubber bullets, and pepper spray on protesters, bill heads to mayor

In this file photo from June, tear gas is fired at protesters on I-676 on the third day of Philadelphia protests in response to police killing George Floyd in Minneapolis, June 01, 2020.
Jessica Griffin / File Photograph
In this file photo from June, tear gas is fired at protesters on I-676 on the third day of Philadelphia protests in response to police killing George Floyd in Minneapolis, June 01, 2020.

Philadelphia City Council approved a ban on the use of tear gas, rubber bullets, and pepper spray on demonstrators exercising their First Amendment rights.

The legislation was approved on a 14-3 vote, after a heated debate about the meaning of peaceful assembly and the history of police brutality against Black residents. Republican Councilmembers David Oh and Brian J. O’Neill, along with Democrat Bobby Henon, voted against it.

Councilmember Helen Gym, who sponsored the bill, introduced it after a Council committee heard this fall from residents affected by the use of tear gas and rubber bullets in West Philadelphia and on Interstate 676 following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

But there is renewed interest in the subject of police response to protests this week, after two police officers fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr. outside his home in West Philadelphia, and as city officials prepare for potential demonstrations following Tuesday’s presidential election.

The legislation will now be sent to Mayor Jim Kenney, who Gym said is supportive of the bill. If he signs the bill, the police department then must write a policy defining what would be classified as First Amendment activities protected by the ban.

“The response from the city to this spring’s Black Lives Matter protests undid years of collaboration and work,” Gym said. “This bill is a first step toward reaffirming that public protest is not at odds with public safety.”

— Laura McCrystal

12:57 PM - October 29, 2020
12:57 PM - October 29, 2020

City to hold hearing on response to mental health crises in light of Walter Wallace Jr.'s killing

In this September 2019 file photo, councilwoman Cindy Bass speaks at a meeting.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
In this September 2019 file photo, councilwoman Cindy Bass speaks at a meeting.

In response to police fatally shooting Walter Wallace Jr. on Monday, Philadelphia City Council will hold a hearing on how the city can better respond to mental health issues and how the police interact with individuals having mental health crises.

“As we are all aware at this point, the tragic death of Walter Wallace Jr. on Monday night shouldn’t have happened,” said Councilmember Cindy Bass, who sponsored the resolution calling for a hearing. “Walter was experiencing a mental health emergency and his family requested help for that emergency. Walter deserved help and should have been here with us today.”

Wallace’s family said he suffered from mental illness, and said they had called 911 to request an ambulance when two police officers responded and fatally shot him.

Councilmember Curtis Jones Jr. cosponsored the resolution with Bass, and also sponsored a resolution calling for the police and the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disability Services to examine and improve mental health provider training.

“What we want to do is take a look at all of the steps from training, to the 911 calls, to boots on the ground on the street, to how we can encourage understanding of mental health crises,” Jones said.

Jones said it is important that individuals who come in contact with police “are innocent until proven guilty and are not sentenced at the point of arrest.”

Council unanimously approved both resolutions Thursday. A hearing has not yet been scheduled.

— Laura McCrystal

12:43 PM - October 29, 2020
12:43 PM - October 29, 2020

Two men arrested after homemade explosives found in a van on the parkway

Police guard a green van with Delaware tags at Logan Circle in Phila., Pa. on Oct. 28, 2020. Police said they found homemade explosives, propane tanks, and power tools inside a van the men were driving, according to police documents.
ELIZABETH ROBERTSON / Staff Photographer
Police guard a green van with Delaware tags at Logan Circle in Phila., Pa. on Oct. 28, 2020. Police said they found homemade explosives, propane tanks, and power tools inside a van the men were driving, according to police documents.

Separate from protests, two men were arrested on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway Wednesday night when police said they found homemade explosives, propane tanks, and power tools inside a van the men were driving, according to police documents.

The arrest, near the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, came after the 9 p.m. citywide curfew Mayor Jim Kenney had announced in an attempt to calm tensions after some theft and vandalism had occurred in the wake of police fatally shooting Walter Wallace Jr.

It also came as police have reported a series of ATM explosions amid the unrest. Police documents say that officers first responded to a report of a burglary at a Mariott Hotel near the Parkway at 9:38 p.m., at which point several vehicles drove away. Police followed one of them — a 2004 Chevy conversion van — until the driver pulled over on the 1800 block of the Parkway.

Inside the van, the documents say, officers could see homemade dynamite. The bomb squad then searched the car, according to the documents, and found 12 M100 homemade bombs, a blowtorch, propane tanks, and power tools.

The men were taken into custody, the documents say. Neither had been arraigned as of early Thursday afternoon, according to court records.

Mike Newall and Chris Palmer

12:22 PM - October 29, 2020
12:22 PM - October 29, 2020

Walter Wallace Jr.'s daughter was born Wednesday. His family is to review police body-cam footage of his death Thursday.

Walter Wallace Jr. in a 2018 family photo. He was fatally shot by police officers in the 6100 block of Locust Street Oct. 26, 2020.
Family Photo
Walter Wallace Jr. in a 2018 family photo. He was fatally shot by police officers in the 6100 block of Locust Street Oct. 26, 2020.

The late Walter Wallace Jr. became a father for the ninth time on Wednesday, two days after Philadelphia police fatally shot him and a day before his family was to review officers' body-camera footage of his death.

Wallace’s wife, Dominique Wallace, whom he married earlier this month, gave birth to a baby girl named Ashonna Winter Wallace, family lawyer Shaka Johnson said Thursday.

“It adds to the egregious nature of the whole narrative. If the man had lived another 44 hours, he would have had the human right to see that child born,” Johnson told The Inquirer. “I feel like it’s poetic injustice to have him gunned down like that.”

The family was to meet with police Thursday morning to view the body-camera footage from the officers who fatally shot Wallace, Johnson said. Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said she planned to publicly release the video, as well as audio of the 911 calls, once the family reviews them.

Funeral arrangements for Wallace will be announced later Thursday, said Johnson, noting he didn’t think the emotion of the last few days had hit him yet.

“Just hours before his daughter is brought into the world he is gunned down in, really cold blood, in front of both of his parents and siblings," he said. “I am a little bit numb. I think I have been in go-mode since they called, and I really haven’t slept much. I don’t think I have had the visceral reaction that I will ultimately have. Maybe the funeral service will invoke it, but I haven’t had it yet.”

“Because I can’t conceive the gravity of what we are speaking about right now,” Johnson added. “I can’t conceive the nature of dying before my child gets here. I can’t conceive the nature of a fatherless child and a husband-less wife.”

— Mensah M. Dean

11:09 AM - October 29, 2020
11:09 AM - October 29, 2020

Unrelated to protests, ’coordinated’ break-ins and theft occur in Lower Merion

A Lower Merion police officer carries out his K-9 partner over broken glass after investigating an apparent break-in at the Lord and Taylor on City Avenue in Bala Cynwyd, Pa., on Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2020.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
A Lower Merion police officer carries out his K-9 partner over broken glass after investigating an apparent break-in at the Lord and Taylor on City Avenue in Bala Cynwyd, Pa., on Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2020.

Quiet fell over Philadelphia Wednesday night. There was no substantial unrest and no large-scale protests like those that had occurred the previous two nights in response to police fatally shooting Walter Wallace Jr., a Black man who had a knife and whose family said he was suffering a mental health crisis.

Miles away, on City Avenue in Bala Cynwyd, a group of people used a tire iron to shatter the entrance to the Lord and Taylor department store around 11 p.m., shortly after they had done the same to a Foot Locker around the corner, Lower Merion police superintendent Michael McGrath said Thursday.

Police arrested a man and woman, whose names were not immediately released, he said, and they were expected to be charged with burglary.

“This was a coordinated thing,” McGrath said, with the group planning the break-ins on social media earlier Wednesday.

“Several people” were involved, he said, and they drove to the department store in cars with license plates that were obscured by plastic bags.

A Lord & Taylor security guard prevented them from getting inside, McGrath said, and authorities recovered the merchandise they stole from Foot Locker.

On Thursday, Lower Merion police were patrolling shopping areas, including the King of Prussia Mall, to deter people from burglarizing them.

— Katie Park

9:41 AM - October 29, 2020
9:41 AM - October 29, 2020

See what happened Wednesday night through the photographer’s lens

— Inquirer staff photographers

8:30 AM - October 29, 2020
8:30 AM - October 29, 2020

Recap: It was a relatively calm Wednesday night after two nights of unrest in response to police fatally shooting Walter Wallace Jr.

A single person remains at the police line at 55th and Pine Street Oct. 28, 2020 after the citywide curfew had passed. He was later handcuffed and detained after police announced impending arrests if people did not leave.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
A single person remains at the police line at 55th and Pine Street Oct. 28, 2020 after the citywide curfew had passed. He was later handcuffed and detained after police announced impending arrests if people did not leave.

Philadelphia’s 9 p.m. curfew came and went Wednesday with no substantional reports of unrest. For the previous two nights, emotions and tensions had run high on the streets of West Philadelphia as people protested in response to police fatally shooting Walter Wallace Jr., a 27-year-old Black man who was holding a knife and whose family said he suffering from a mental health crisis.

On Wednesday night, however, police officers appeared to outnumber even pedestrians throughout the city. There were no large-scale protests.

A small group of demonstrators gathered in West Philadelphia, a few blocks away from the 18th District headquarters, and spoke through a bullhorn. Some were eventually handcuffed and detained for being out past curfew.

Center City was quiet, with some business windows boarded up as a precaution and small numbers of people out just before 9 p.m. Some walked dogs, ate or picked up food from restaurants that remained open.

A pedestrian passes the boarded up Five Guys on Chestnut Street in Center City Philadelphia shortly before curfew on Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2020.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
A pedestrian passes the boarded up Five Guys on Chestnut Street in Center City Philadelphia shortly before curfew on Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2020.

A planned demonstration, which had been promoted on social media for Washington Square, drew around 20 people who milled about and then left the park.

Pennsylvania State Police units from Allentown, Lancaster, and Hazleton — mounted on horses from Hershey — staged near Love Park.

Unrelated to any protest, people broke in and stole merchandise at businesses on both sides of City Avenue, as well as sporadically in Kensington and Frankford.

Police outside the Lord and Taylor on City Avenue after reports of break-ins on Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2020.
Tim Tai / Staff Photographer
Police outside the Lord and Taylor on City Avenue after reports of break-ins on Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2020.

— Stephanie Farr, Maddie Hanna, and Robert Moran

8:15 AM - October 29, 2020
8:15 AM - October 29, 2020

Thursday roundup of our coverage of the Walter Wallace Jr. shooting

Trying to learn more about what’s happened in Philadelphia since police fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr. on Monday? Here’s what we recommend you read to learn about the protest movement, Wallace, and the aftermath of his death.