11:10 AM - October 28, 2020
11:10 AM - October 28, 2020

Latest updates: Grief, anger, and questions remain in West Philadelphia; Trump says he’s ready to send in federal resources ‘if requested’

West Philadelphia is grieving, questions remain about Walter Wallace Jr.'s death by Philadelphia police, business in Port Richmond are cleaning up after overnight break-ins and theft, and President Donald Trump says he will send federal resources to the city “if requested.” Follow along here for the latest updates.

12:10 AM - October 28, 2020
12:10 AM - October 28, 2020

Recap: Second night of unrest in response to police killing of Walter Wallace Jr.

After a second evening of protests in the wake of the police killing of Walter Wallace Jr., tensions flared between police and demonstrators Tuesday, and scattered looting broke out in several areas of the city, prompting police to request that residents of West and North Philadelphia, Kensington, and other areas remain indoors.

Police and demonstrators skirmished at the intersection of 52nd and Market Streets — the epicenter of protests Monday after police shot and killed Wallace — and officers used pepper spray and batons, making numerous arrests. Some of the demonstrators hurled debris at police, and one officer was struck by a water bottle.

Police reported looting in the area of Castor and Aramingo Avenues in the city’s Port Richmond section, and along City Avenue. The looting reports precipitated the stay-inside requests from the Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management.

Overnight into early Wednesday morning, police continued reporting sporadic incidents but most of the crowds had dispersed.

The protests after the fatal shooting of Wallace by two police officers, an incident captured on a widely circulated video, evoked the demonstrations against police abuse stirred by the killing of George Floyd in May by police officers in Minneapolis.

Read more of our coverage of today’s events:

11:20 PM - October 27, 2020
11:20 PM - October 27, 2020

Aramingo Ave. remains looting ‘hot spot’

A man outside the Aramingo Avenue Walmart, where extensive looting occurred Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020.
Jessica Griffin / Staff photographer
A man outside the Aramingo Avenue Walmart, where extensive looting occurred Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020.

Police said late Tuesday night that looting remained a problem along the Aramingo Avenue commercial corridor but that there were no other “hot spots” in the city.

Earlier, a livestreamer on Facebook showed a steady wave of people running in and out of stores with stolen merchandise.

As the unrest swelled, police said a double shooting that left two teens wounded in Port Richmond around 8:45 p.m. may have been connected to looting at Castor and Aramingo Avenues. They did not offer further details.

— Robert Moran, Chris Palmer

10:39 PM - October 27, 2020
10:39 PM - October 27, 2020

‘Nothing’s happening, nothing’s changing,’ speaker tells riot police

Brandon Jones, a motivational speaker also known as “Mr. Motivation” pulled up with a trailer called “Hard Knock U” in the intersection of 52nd and Chestnut Streets, and talked to the line of riot police.

“Nothing’s happening, nothing’s changing,” he said.

“What I need y’all officers to know is you will treat us like humans,” Jones said to the line of riot cops on 52nd and Chestnut Streets. “When you take off those uniforms, you look just like us, you live in neighborhoods just like us.”

Jones demanded to know why the officers who fatally shot Wallace were still on the force.

— Oona Goodin-Smith

10:26 PM - October 27, 2020
10:26 PM - October 27, 2020

Stores boarded up amid extensive looting on Aramingo Avenue

In Port Richmond, which was hit with extensive looting Tuesday night, stores along Aramingo Avenue were boarded up after significant looting on the corridor Tuesday night; the entrances of others appeared to have been forced open.

Security alarms were blaring amid sirens and honking horns, and police and other security cars were stationed in front of some stores. There were empty shopping carts in a few parking lots and cars pulling U-turns in the middle of Aramingo and on the streets around them.

In the Port Richmond neighborhood around the area, residents were standing on corners and on front porches, several with baseball bats.

— Allison Steele

10:20 PM - October 27, 2020
10:20 PM - October 27, 2020

Scuffle between police and protesters at 52nd and Market

Protesters scuffle with police officers at 52nd and Market on the second day of protests after the fatal shooting of Walter Wallace Jr. Wallace was shot and killed by police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
Protesters scuffle with police officers at 52nd and Market on the second day of protests after the fatal shooting of Walter Wallace Jr. Wallace was shot and killed by police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.
10:18 PM - October 27, 2020
10:18 PM - October 27, 2020

Couple gets engaged amid protests, police

As police said they had regained control of 52nd and Market Street after a clash with protesters, nearby at 52nd and Chestnut, a man got down on a knee in the middle of the empty intersection and proposed to his girlfriend to cheers and applause from onlookers.

Maurice Small, 32, proposed to Tanesha Pennington, his girlfriend of eight years, in the intersection of 52nd and Chestnut, as a line of police officers with riot shields looked on.

Maurice Small, 32, proposed to Tanesha Pennington, his girlfriend of 8 years, in the intersection of 52nd and Chestnut, as a line of police officers with riot shields looked on. Pennington said she and Small conceived a baby, but had lost it to a miscarriage. The tragedy, she said, brought them closer together, and led to TuesdayÕs moment. ÒWe realized we didnÕt want to be with anyone else,Ó a tearful Pennington said.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
Maurice Small, 32, proposed to Tanesha Pennington, his girlfriend of 8 years, in the intersection of 52nd and Chestnut, as a line of police officers with riot shields looked on. Pennington said she and Small conceived a baby, but had lost it to a miscarriage. The tragedy, she said, brought them closer together, and led to TuesdayÕs moment. ÒWe realized we didnÕt want to be with anyone else,Ó a tearful Pennington said.

Pennington said she and Small conceived a baby, but had lost it to a miscarriage. The tragedy, she said, brought them closer together, and led to Tuesday’s moment.

“We realized we didn’t want to be with anyone else,” a tearful Pennington said

— Vinny Vella

9:53 PM - October 27, 2020
9:53 PM - October 27, 2020

Philly tells residents in West Philly and elsewhere to stay indoors

The Philadelphia Office of Emergency Management told residents in West Philadelphia, as well as Kensington, Fairhill, North Philly, Fishtown, and Port Richmond, to remain inside due to the unrest.

SEPTA subway trains on the Market-Frankford Line are bypassing the 52nd Street Station.

— Chris Palmer, Robert Moran

9:48 PM - October 27, 2020
9:48 PM - October 27, 2020

Police use pepper spray, batons on 52nd Street

Philadelphia Police Officers begin to baton and pepper spray protesters to back up at the cross street of 52nd and Market Street on Tuesday, Oct., 27, 2020. This is the second day of unrest after Walter Wallace Jr. was shot and killed by police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Philadelphia Police Officers begin to baton and pepper spray protesters to back up at the cross street of 52nd and Market Street on Tuesday, Oct., 27, 2020. This is the second day of unrest after Walter Wallace Jr. was shot and killed by police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.

Police said they were being attacked by protesters at the intersection of 52nd and Market Streets and officers used pepper spray and batons as they worked to control the crowd.

The 52nd Street commercial corridor was the scene of numerous clashes on Monday night when the unrest first erupted.

— Robert Moran

9:35 PM - October 27, 2020
9:35 PM - October 27, 2020

Protesters throw objects at police in West Philly; officers chase demonstrators

Philadelphia Police Officers create a line blocking the intersections of 55th and Pine Street as protesters yell and chant at them.
TYGER WILLIAMS / Staff Photographer
Philadelphia Police Officers create a line blocking the intersections of 55th and Pine Street as protesters yell and chant at them.

Around 9:20 p.m., protesters started throwing objects at a small group of officers and chased them down Delancey Street near 52nd Street.

Several officers were struck and two “assists” for backup were broadcast. More officers showed up and then started chasing the protesters.

The protestors tried to use dumpsters and trash as makeshift barricades.

Police said protesters doused them with an unknown red liquid.

“Multiple arrests” were made, police said.

— Robert Moran

9:30 PM - October 27, 2020
9:30 PM - October 27, 2020

Video: Family and neighborhood react to police shooting of Walter Wallace Jr. in West Philadelphia

9:28 PM - October 27, 2020
9:28 PM - October 27, 2020

‘Distraught’ demonstrators confront police at 55th and Pine

David Parker, an acquaintance to Walter Wallace Jr., yells at the line of police officers.
Tyger Williams / Staff photographer
David Parker, an acquaintance to Walter Wallace Jr., yells at the line of police officers.

David Parker, an acquaintance of Walter Wallace Jr., joined the demonstration at the 18th District Police headquarters at 5500 Pine St. to express his anger at the officers.

"I feel distraught," Parker said. “I want to see a noticeable and prevalent difference on how police handle matters, period. The gun is not meant to solve anything. Physical restraint was all that was necessary.”

— Tyger Williams

9:17 PM - October 27, 2020
9:17 PM - October 27, 2020

Digital ad truck shows Wallace Jr.'s image as crowd demonstrates against police

Protesters meet police at 55th and Pine Tuesday, October 27, 2020. Walter Wallace Jr. was shot and killed by police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
Protesters meet police at 55th and Pine Tuesday, October 27, 2020. Walter Wallace Jr. was shot and killed by police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.

Shortly after 9 p.m., many of the protesters who had gathered at the 18th District police station to demonstrate against the officers there were seen moving east on Pine Street.

There were no violent clashes so far.

Earlier, a digital advertising truck arrived at the scene and flashed images of Walter Wallace Jr. to the crowd. People climbed on the truck and chanted.

Some protesters climbed on top of a Telemundo TV vehicle to address the demonstrators and lead chants.

— Vinny Vella, Oona Goodin-Smith

9:05 PM - October 27, 2020
9:05 PM - October 27, 2020

Family lawyer says police knew about Walter Wallace Jr.'s mental-health issues

Kathy Brant and Walter Wallace, the parents of Walter Wallace, Jr., talk to the news media outside their home in the 6100 block of Locust St, Oct. 27, 2020, their son was shot and killed by police officers outside the house on Monday, Oct. 26.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
Kathy Brant and Walter Wallace, the parents of Walter Wallace, Jr., talk to the news media outside their home in the 6100 block of Locust St, Oct. 27, 2020, their son was shot and killed by police officers outside the house on Monday, Oct. 26.

Walter Wallace Jr. was under a doctor’s care mental illness and had been taking lithium, said Shaka Johnson, a lawyer representing the family.

Police knew about Wallace’s condition — the 911 call that led to Wallace’s death was the third of the day, Johnson said. Wallace’s brother made the call asking for an ambulance. Police arrived instead.

“To think about calling for assistance and winding up with the people you called for assistance killing you...” Johnson said. He said the police department was “setting their officers up for failure” and the officers who shot Wallace were “lambs to the slaughter because of lack of training.”

Johnson said: “He was gunned down in the street, the dirty Philadelphia street.”

He said justice for the family would look like "reform in the Philadelphia Police Department and adequate training” in responding to those with mental health issues.

— Kristen A. Graham

8:55 PM - October 27, 2020
8:55 PM - October 27, 2020

Looting reported in Port Richmond

Police reported widespread looting Tuesday night of business in the area of Castor and Aramingo Avenues in the city’s Port Richmond section.

A Fox29 helicopter live video showed people removing large boxes out of a nearby Walmart department store. Police confirmed the store was being looted.

Other stores in the area were also hit, police said.

— Robert Moran

8:49 PM - October 27, 2020
8:49 PM - October 27, 2020

Walter Wallace Sr. on looting: ‘They’re not helping my family, they’re showing disrespect’

Walter Wallace Sr. stood outside the family’s home Tuesday night, the day after Philadelphia police fatally shot his son, and denounced looting and other illegal actions.

“They’re not helping my family, they’re showing disrespect,” Wallace Sr said. “Stop this violence and chaos. People have businesses. We all got to eat.”

Wallace Sr, who worked as a trash collector for the city for 33 years, spoke in a strong voice laced with anguish. He said when he closes his eyes, he sees his son being “murdered, butchered” in front of him.

“We got good cops, we got bad cops in the system. Everybody’s got to be held accountable for what they do.”

Two of Wallace’s young sons stood in front of dozens of cameras and reporters, tall but clearly shaken. They praised their dad.

“And Black lives still matter,” one Wallace boy said, tears in his eyes.

— Kristen A. Graham

8:33 PM - October 27, 2020
8:33 PM - October 27, 2020

‘I just want them to be trained to de-escalate, not shoot’

Andrea Dingle, 31, of South Philadelphia brought her four children to the front lines of the protest at the 18th District police precinct to “take back our power.”

Face to face with a line of police holding riot shields, the young family raised their fists together.

“My son looks like Walter Wallace, he has mental issues like Walter Wallace, I am scared he will be killed like Walter Wallace,” she said, holding her 9-year-old son, Derrick.

“They are out here traumatizing us, they are scaring us,” she said. “They are scared of the communities they are supposed to protect ... I don’t want drama. I just want them to be trained to de-escalate, not shoot.”

— Oona Goodin-Smith

8:33 PM - October 27, 2020
8:33 PM - October 27, 2020

‘Nobody has ever made them own up to what they do’

Shari Hill attended the meeting at the Church of Christian compassion with her 29-year-old daughter, Paige Goodin. Hill said she believes Mayor Jim Kenney, Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw, and District Attorney Larry Krasner are on the side of community members like her, but that the police department had to implement real changes in training and in using de-escalation tactics.

“This stuff is embedded in the police force, going back to Mayor Rizzo,” said Hill, who owns two day care businesses in the neighborhood. “They were allowed to do whatever they wanted, to whoever they wanted. Nobody has ever made them own up to what they do.”

Hill said the shooting, followed by the unrest in the neighborhood, brought back memories of the summer, when local stores were damaged and police tear-gassed some blocks.

“I was devastated when I woke up this morning,” she said.

Outside the community meeting, attendees exited to face the row of police across the street. Some openly laughed at the police presence, while others were more disturbed.

“Where were all these police yesterday?” Asked Juanita Rivers, a pastor at a nearby church. “This is a peaceful place. This is a church!”

— Allison Steele

8:12 PM - October 27, 2020
8:12 PM - October 27, 2020

Protesters march to West Philly police precinct

Protesters meet police at 55th and Pine Tuesday, October 27, 2020. Walter Wallace Jr. was shot and killed by police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
Protesters meet police at 55th and Pine Tuesday, October 27, 2020. Walter Wallace Jr. was shot and killed by police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.

Several hundred protesters marched to the 18th District police station at 55th and Pine Streets and were at a standoff with officers wearing riot gear standing behind metal barricades.

Neighbors are coming out of their homes and standing on porches to watch.

There were chants of “if we don’t get it, shut it down.”

A second group of marchers was reported to be at 40th and Chestnut and heading south.

— Oona Goodin-Smith, Vinny Vella

7:52 PM - October 27, 2020
7:52 PM - October 27, 2020

Marchers chant at officers in riot helmets in West Philadelphia

Several hundred protesters who earlier had rallied at Malcolm X Park separated into at least two marches, one apparently heading east toward University City and possibly Center City.

A group was going west along Market Street to 52nd Street and then turned south, possibly back toward the park.

As they marched past police officers in riot helmets, they chanted, “who do you protect, who do you serve.”

A line of police officer stood outside store that had been looted Monday on the 52nd Street corridor.

Police stand outside stores at 52nd and Chestnut Streets that were looted the previous day.
Vinny Vella / Staff
Police stand outside stores at 52nd and Chestnut Streets that were looted the previous day.

— Oona Goodin-Smith and Vinny Vella

7:52 PM - October 27, 2020
7:52 PM - October 27, 2020

Outlaw questioned about why officers haven’t been fired

At a community meeting at a West Philadelphia church, Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw was questioned why the officers who shot Walter Wallace Jr. still had their jobs.

A man asked: “When are you going to fire the police officers that did the murder?”

Outlaw said she anticipated that question. “I’m going to be honest, I don’t have an answer for you," she said. The commissioner acknowledged that some might view the video of the shooting as evidence enough, but said there was “due process" and "this is all still unfolding.”

“We need those officers locked up,” man told Outlaw. “We have a powder keg in front of us, a community that is in pain.”

— Maddie Hanna

7:41 PM - October 27, 2020
7:41 PM - October 27, 2020

Demonstrators begin marching from Malcolm X park

Marchers protest the police shooting death of Walter Wallace Jr. on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020.
Vinny Vella/Staff photograph
Marchers protest the police shooting death of Walter Wallace Jr. on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020.

About 400 to 500 people, according to a police estimate, have begun marching from the demonstration for Walter Wallace Jr. at Malcolm X Park.

The beginning of the march was peaceful.

Earlier, Krystal Strong, of Black Lives Matter, implored the crowd at the park to honor Wallace as a man, not just a cause to rally around.

“We’re watching the way how Walter Wallace Jr. is becoming a symbol,” she said. “And we’re losing sight of how this was a human being.”

Strong said she spent the day talking with Wallace’s family.

“The grief this family is feeling is unspeakable,” she said. “I want all of you here, with all the anger you’re feeling, to think about the life that was lost yesterday.”

— Oona Goodin Smith and Vinny Vella

7:33 PM - October 27, 2020
7:33 PM - October 27, 2020

‘We’re going to be here again and again and again’

At the Malcolm X Park demonstration, Michael Wilson, with Philly for R.E.A.L. Justice and the Workers World Party, told the crowd that protesters would be out every night until there is real change.

“I would hate to see this city catch it again tonight,” he said. “But one way or another, if this city, this police, white people fail to see any value in Black people, we’re going to be here again and again and again.”

— Oona Goodin-Smith and Vinny Vella

7:30 PM - October 27, 2020
7:30 PM - October 27, 2020

Vandalism arrests in Center City

Police reported making several arrests of juveniles in Center City for acts of vandalism on Tuesday night.

Officers were following several small groups that police said were possibly looking for opportunities to loot stores.

— Robert Moran

7:17 PM - October 27, 2020
7:17 PM - October 27, 2020

‘Say his name. Walter Wallace Jr.’: Hundreds gather at Malcolm X Park

Many gather at Malcolm-X Park on Saturday, Oct. 27, in protest for Walter Wallace Jr., whom police shot and killed on the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26, 2020.
Tyger Williams / Staff photographer
Many gather at Malcolm-X Park on Saturday, Oct. 27, in protest for Walter Wallace Jr., whom police shot and killed on the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26, 2020.

By 7 p.m., about 500 people had gathered for a demonstration at Malcolm X Park, a day after Philadelphia police fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr.

“Say his name. Walter Wallace Jr.,” the crowd chanted.

Speakers drew comparisons to the death of Ricardo Munoz, a Lancaster man killed in September during a mental health crisis, similar to Wallace’s death.

“Please know the whole world saw that video,” said Asantewaa Nkrumah-Ture, a member of the Black Alliance for Peace.

“What is especially heartbreaking is that the whole world saw that man murdered in front of his mother,” she said. “We must come up with ways of treating people in a mental heart crisis without calling police.”

Nkrumah-Ture suggested making a list of health professionals in neighborhoods to combat this practice. And she stressed the importance of organizing neighborhood residents, and to not let Tuesday’s rally become a political event for Joe Biden or other candidates who “don’t care about us."

— Oona Goodin-Smith and Vinny Vella

7:13 PM - October 27, 2020
7:13 PM - October 27, 2020

DA Krasner: Role of government ‘is to protect us’

District Attorney Larry Krasner said at a church meeting Tuesday night that he’s committed to sitting down with Walter Wallace Jr.’s mother “when she is ready.”

He said the role of government “is to protect us,” and when a mother calls because her son is having a mental health problem, “there’s one thing we can all agree: when you call the government for protection,” for help with a mentally ill child, “and within one minute he is shot to death, then something went wrong.”

The prosecutor also encouraged people to come forward with information.

“We know there are some people who may not have spoken to police,” Krasner said. “I hope you do,” but if people aren’t comfortable doing that, Krasner said his office wants to talk to them.

“The only way we’re gonna get to justice is if we have all the information that there is,” Krasner said.

— Maddie Hanna, Allison Steele

7:09 PM - October 27, 2020
7:09 PM - October 27, 2020

Police commissioner Outlaw says she is at church meeting to listen

Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw offered condolences to the family of Walter Wallace Jr., and said she was at a church meeting to listen, the day after officers shot and killed the West Philadelphia man.

She noted the "raw emotion” being felt ini the city and in communities across the country.

“It’s 2020 and we’re still having the same conversations we had years out,” Outlaw said. She said she was committed to being “a learning organization,” and tired of “hearing the same thing over and over again.” She told the crowd she wants to hear what the community had to say.

— Maddie Hanna, Allison Steele

6:47 PM - October 27, 2020
6:47 PM - October 27, 2020

Mayor Kenney addresses community at emergency church meeting

Mayor Kenney joins other elected officials and local leaders at an emergency community meeting at the Church of the Christian Compassion in Cobbs Creek.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
Mayor Kenney joins other elected officials and local leaders at an emergency community meeting at the Church of the Christian Compassion in Cobbs Creek.

Mayor Jim Kenney joined other city officials Tuesday night in talking to community members at an emergency church meeting in the Cobbs Creek section, a day after Philadelphia police shot and killed Walter Wallace Jr.

“Like many of you I have watched a terrible video of this tragic incident. It presents difficult questions that must be answered,” Mayor Jim Kenney told a crowd socially distanced in pews at the Church of the Christian Compassion at 6121 Cedar Ave. “We need a speedy and transparent resolution for the sake of Mr Wallace, his family,” and the community.

Kenney said the events on Monday night provided “further evidence of the anguish of Black and brown residents of our city who have struggled their entire lives under systemic racism,” and said “our systems fail” Black men. He pledged to spend “my remaining days in office to bring about justice and true equity for all the residents of our city.”

Kenney also said “I know that many Philadelphians are feeling frustrated and outraged following yesterday’s tragic incident. I fully support everyone’s first amendment rights to protest. We also want to ensure that our communities are not further harmed.”

— Maddie Hanna

6:31 PM - October 27, 2020
6:31 PM - October 27, 2020

People arrive for emergency church meeting and park protest

An emergency community meeting with city leaders was set for Tuesday evening at a church in the Cobbs Creek section of West Philadelphia to address the fatal shooting by police of Walter Wallace Jr.

In the meantime, protesters were gathering at Malcolm X Park at 5100 Pine St. for a demonstration and possible march. Shortly before 6:30 p.m., more than 150 people had arrived. Some were holding signs that said “Counselors, not cops” and “Black community in control of police” and “Stop sending police to mental health crises.”

The rally began amid some slight tension from neighborhood residents in the park, who challenged the organizers, asking where they are when they face discrimination every day.

The emergency meeting was being held at the Church of Christian Compassion at 6121 Cedar Ave. Councilmembers Kendra Brooks and Helen Gym already were in attendance.

— Maddie Hanna, Oona Goodin-Smith and Vinny Vella

6:00 PM - October 27, 2020
6:00 PM - October 27, 2020

D.A. Krasner vows fair review of Wallace shooting

Philly DA Larry Krasner holds a press conference in Center City on the fatal shooting by police of Walter Wallace Jr. in Philadelphia.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
Philly DA Larry Krasner holds a press conference in Center City on the fatal shooting by police of Walter Wallace Jr. in Philadelphia.

Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner said Tuesday that his office was in the early stages of reviewing evidence in the fatal police shooting of Walter Wallace Jr., and that he was examining some of the material personally as prosecutors began investigating whether the case might merit charges against the officers who fired shots.

During a news conference outside his Center City office, Krasner pledged that his office would be impartial as the investigation progressed. He did not give a timeframe for when the review might be complete, saying only that the probe was in its “very early” stages.

“We are not out to cover for anybody. We are not out to get anybody,” Krasner said.

During his three years in office, Krasner — previously a defense attorney with a long history of suing city police over misconduct — has charged two former officers, Ryan Pownall and Eric Ruch, with murder. Both cases remain pending in court.

Before those prosecutions, no city officer had been charged over an on-duty shooting in two decades. The police officers' union — which has been at odds with Krasner since he was a candidate for office — has fiercely opposed his decision to prosecute Pownall and Ruch.

The union this week issued statements in support of the two officers who fired at Wallace in West Philadelphia on Monday while also calling for patience as the incident is investigated. Police have said Wallace was moving toward the officers while holding a knife when they opened fire.

As for the unrest that unfolded late Monday in the aftermath of Wallace’s death, Krasner said his office has processed and charged 27 commercial burglary cases, with another 76 cases pending further information.

Krasner also said prosecutors were expecting to see 11 cases of assault against a law enforcement officer, but that information regarding those cases were still pending.

Chris Palmer and Mike Newall

5:48 PM - October 27, 2020
5:48 PM - October 27, 2020

Businesses across city board windows, close early

The Foot Locker near 15th and Chestnut street in Philadelphia is in the process of being boarded up on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020. Stores in Center City are boarding up in anticipation of potential looting or damage as protests are expected to continue over the fatal police shooting of Walter Wallace Jr. that occurred in the Cobbs Creek section of Philadelphia on Monday.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
The Foot Locker near 15th and Chestnut street in Philadelphia is in the process of being boarded up on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020. Stores in Center City are boarding up in anticipation of potential looting or damage as protests are expected to continue over the fatal police shooting of Walter Wallace Jr. that occurred in the Cobbs Creek section of Philadelphia on Monday.

Businesses across the city were boarding windows or closing early Tuesday in preparation for a possible second night of civil unrest in response to the fatal police shooting on Monday of Walter Wallace Jr.

Business owners along Baltimore Avenue spent Tuesday afternoon boarding up windows. A 6ABC reporter tweeted that the Target department store on Monument Road near City Avenue also was boarding up. CVS pharmacies were reportedly closing early. Several stores in Center City closed so that workers could board windows.

City Councilmembers Kendra Brooks and Jamie Gauthier advised residents in West Philadelphia that certain stores were closing early and directed people in need to a food pantry.

— Samantha Melamed and Oona Goodin-Smith

5:02 PM - October 27, 2020
5:02 PM - October 27, 2020

Pa. National Guard says it has been mobilized in response to Philly unrest

At the request of city officials, Gov. Tom Wolf has mobilized the National Guard to Philadelphia in response to the civil unrest that has erupted police shot and killed Walter Wallace Jr.

Several hundred guardsmen are expected to arrive within the city within the next 24 to 48 hours, said Lt. Col. Keith Hickox, a spokesperson for the Pennsylvania National Guard.

Details of their deployment have not yet been determined, but Hickox said they will assist police in “protecting life, property and the right to peacefully assemble and protest.”

He compared their likely mission to the role the Guard played during racial injustice protests in the city this spring, when guardsmen were primarily used to provide security for “critical infrastructure” and to free up police perform other duties.

Guard “members are well-trained and well-prepared to assist the commonwealth and its communities in any way they can,” a spokesperson for Gov. Wolf said.

They did not say how long the Guard presence was expected to last or whether the troops sent to the city would be sticking around to respond to potential unrest surrounding the outcome of the election.

Earlier Tuesday, Mayor Jim Kenney said that discussions continue with the Governor’s office over the possibility of a Guard deployment should election-related protests materialize.

Those talks continue, a spokesperson for the city said.

But Should their assistance be needed, Hickox said, the guard will be ready.

“We’ve been preparing for more civil unrest, especially since June,” he said. “We’re planning for the snowstorm or the hurricane long before it’s in the forecast.”

— Jeremy Roebuck

4:58 PM - October 27, 2020
4:58 PM - October 27, 2020

Biden, Harris speak out on death of Walter Wallace Jr.

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at Mountain Top Inn & Resort in Georgia on Tuesday.
Andrew Harnik / AP
Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at Mountain Top Inn & Resort in Georgia on Tuesday.

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and running mate Kamala Harris issued a statement late Tuesday afternoon on the fatal shooting of Walter Wallace Jr. by Philadelphia police.

“Our hearts are broken for the family of Walter Wallace Jr., and for all those suffering the emotional weight of learning about another Black life in America lost. We cannot accept that in this country a mental health crisis ends in death,” said former Vice President Biden and U.S. Senator Harris in a statement.

“It makes the shock and grief and violence of yesterday’s shooting that much more painful, especially for a community that has already endured so much trauma. Walter Wallace’s life, like too many others', was a Black life that mattered — to his mother, to his family, to his community, to all of us,” Biden and Harris said.

"At the same time, no amount of anger at the very real injustices in our society excuses violence. Attacking police officers and vandalizing small businesses, which are already struggling during a pandemic, does not bend the moral arc of the universe closer to justice. It hurts our fellow citizens.

“Looting is not a protest, it is a crime. It draws attention away from the real tragedy of a life cut short. As a nation, we are strong enough to both meet the challenges of real police reform, including implementing a national use of force standard, and to maintain peace and security in our communities. That must be our American mission. That is how we will deliver real justice. All Donald Trump does is fan the flames of division in our society. He is incapable of doing the real work to bring people together. We will.We are all praying for the entire Wallace family, and for our nation, that we may move toward healing.”

— Robert Moran

4:52 PM - October 27, 2020
4:52 PM - October 27, 2020

Philly clergy group marches to police station in West Philly

Members of the Black clergy march on 61st Street to the 18th police precinct in Philadelphia, Pa. on October 27, 2020. Walter Wallace Jr. was shot and killed by police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.
DAVID MAIALETTI / Staff Photographer
Members of the Black clergy march on 61st Street to the 18th police precinct in Philadelphia, Pa. on October 27, 2020. Walter Wallace Jr. was shot and killed by police officers at the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia on Monday, Oct. 26.

Members of the Black Clergy of Philadelphia — joined by U.S. Rep. Dwight Evans — marched Tuesday afternoon from the block where Walter Wallace Jr. was fatally shot by two officers to the 18th District police station.

A march leader shouted into a bullhorn that police have become “so comfortable shooting us because we’ve become comfortable shooting each other.”

The march — with about 150 people — reached metal barriers blocking 55th Street near the police station. Officers were standing five deep on the other side of the barriers.

Marchers reach police and barricades at the police station at 55th and Pine Streets in Philadelphia on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020.
Mensah M. Dean / Staff
Marchers reach police and barricades at the police station at 55th and Pine Streets in Philadelphia on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020.

— Mensah M. Dean

4:15 PM - October 27, 2020
4:15 PM - October 27, 2020

Photos: Family and friends grieve after police kill Walter Wallace Jr.

4:08 PM - October 27, 2020
4:08 PM - October 27, 2020

Police union chief asks for patience as fatal shooting by officers is investigated

The leader of the union representing city police officers asked for the public’s patience as the internal investigation proceeds on the fatal shooting on Monday of Walter Wallace Jr.

“We’re confident that investigators will conduct an exhaustive and transparent review of all the facts related to this tragic incident,” John McNesby, president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, said in a statement. “The use of lethal force is a very difficult decision and we support our officers as they worked to resolve this incident under a great deal of stress. These officers were aggressively approached by a man wielding a knife.”

McNesby added, "Since this incident, thirty police officers have been injured, which is unacceptable. Rioting and looting in our great city will not be tolerated. Again, we ask the public to reserve judgement until this investigation is completed.

“Please keep everyone involved in this incident in your thoughts and prayers.”

— Robert Moran

3:16 PM - October 27, 2020
3:16 PM - October 27, 2020

Walter Wallace Jr.'s family called an ambulance, not police, for assistance with his mental health crisis, family lawyers say

Attorney's for the Wallace family, Shaka Johnson, left, and Kevin P. O'Brien, right, speak to the media outside Walter Wallace Jr.'s home in West Philadelphia Philadelphia, Pa. Tuesday, October 27, 2020.
JOSE F. MORENO / Staff Photographer
Attorney's for the Wallace family, Shaka Johnson, left, and Kevin P. O'Brien, right, speak to the media outside Walter Wallace Jr.'s home in West Philadelphia Philadelphia, Pa. Tuesday, October 27, 2020.

On Monday afternoon, Walter Wallace Jr.'s family called for an ambulance, not police, to respond to the home and help mitigate his spiraling mental health crisis, said Shaka Johnson, the family’s lawyer.

Instead, two police officers arrived. Wallace’s pregnant wife told the officers that her husband had bipolar disorder and was in crisis, Johnson said. They later fatally shot him.

Johnson was joined at the family home with fellow attorney Kevin P. O’Brien.

Johnson said that since the shooting the news has been slanted one way, therefore the family will tell their story this evening.

“My position should be clear. That was an unjustified shooting,” he said. “We have a person who has mental health issues, we’re going to vet those out as the process continues. But we have officers who I think are not properly trained to deal with those mental health issues.”

— Ellie Rushing and Mensah M. Dean

3:06 PM - October 27, 2020
3:06 PM - October 27, 2020

Philly 911 center’s embedded behavioral health specialist was not on duty Monday, commissioner says

In this May 30, 2020, file photo, Philadelphia Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw speaks during a news conference.
Tim Tai / AP
In this May 30, 2020, file photo, Philadelphia Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw speaks during a news conference.

A behavioral health specialist who is now embedded in Philadelphia’s 911 call center was not on duty Monday when the police received calls to respond to an incident that resulted in two officers fatally shooting Walter Wallace Jr., Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said Tuesday.

The city embedded a behavioral health specialist in the call center for the first time this month, as part of a pilot program.

“This person was not working at the time this call came out,” Outlaw said. “As this program grows this person will assist us with triaging calls to determine the most appropriate response, whether or not a police response is more important, or maybe even a co-response with other providers are more appropriate.”

Outlaw said Tuesday that program, along with a co-respondent model through which outreach workers embed with police officers, had been underway even before June, when calls for police reform erupted after the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

“All of these things have been underway but really got some momentum in the last several months,” Outlaw said.

Meanwhile, Outlaw said her department can also improve the questions that 911 dispatchers ask and what they communicate to officers in the field.

“It’s important to just give a full history in lay person speak,” she said. such as, “what’s going on, if there are weapons involved, if there’s a history of the involved person trying to hurt themselves or others, layout of the house.”

Laura McCrystal

3:01 PM - October 27, 2020
3:01 PM - October 27, 2020

In Cobbs Creek, Walter Wallace Jr.'s relatives, neighbors chant for justice

On the porch outside Walter Wallace Jr.'s Cobbs Creek home, relatives gathered Tuesday afternoon chanting for justice.

“Do Black Lives Matter?” one yelled from the top of the porch.

“Yes!” neighbors responded.

“Black Lives matter! Black lives matter!” relatives and neighbors chanted in unison, their fists held in the air.

“We want justice!” they shouted

A contingent of about 20 journalists from local and national outlets converged on the 6100 block of Locust Street to see if the family would make a statement.

Philly lawyer Shaka Johnson, who at one time represented Maurice Hill for the shooting of six police officers in August 2019, arrived at the Wallace home. Johnson, a former Atlanta police officer known for his courtroom oratory skills, is one of the city’s highest-profile defense attorneys.

It was not immediately clear why Johnson was there.

Ellie Rushing and Mensah M. Dean

2:57 PM - October 27, 2020
2:57 PM - October 27, 2020

It’s possible the National Guard could be deployed to Philly due to unrest, but officials hedge on whether specific plans have been made

Members of the National Guard stand outside of City Hall in Philadelphia, Pa. on Monday, June 1, 2020.
MONICA HERNDON / Staff Photographer
Members of the National Guard stand outside of City Hall in Philadelphia, Pa. on Monday, June 1, 2020.

City officials said Tuesday that deployment of National Guard troops to Philadelphia to assist with election security and police response to the civil unrest that has erupted since police shot and killed Walter Wallace Jr. remains a possibility.

Though neither Mayor Kenney nor Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw offered a definitive answer on whether they were aware that specific plans for a Guard mobilization had been put in place.

“We have put out a request for mutual aid” from other law enforcement departments, said Outlaw. “We are exploring all of our options at this time to ensure that all our [police] resources are focused on what’s in front of us, whether that be the actual civil unrest or the crime that continues to occur throughout the city.”

During racial injustice protests this spring, the Guard was deployed to the city to provide a visible law enforcement presence around critical infrastructure and shopping corridors that had been subject to looting.

If another mobilization of that kind were to occur, Outlaw said she envisioned a similar mission — though given the timing, she added, that mission might bleed over with demands for election security.

Kenney acknowledged that he had discussed with Gov. Tom Wolf the possibility of a Guard deployment to handle potential fallout from the election — but did not definitively say whether any specific decisions had been made.

Spokespersons for the Pennsylvania National Guard, the governor’s office, and the state Department of Military and Veterans Affairs did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Jeremy Roebuck and Laura McCrystal

2:48 PM - October 27, 2020
2:48 PM - October 27, 2020

Nearly 100 people were arrested amid Monday’s unrest, police say as they prepare for another night of protests

Police detain a young man on Chestnut St. between 52nd and 53rd sts. on Oct. 26, 2020. after a group was throwing object at police. The unrest occurred hours after police fatally shot Walter Wallace, Jr., a 27-year-old Black man.
CHARLES FOX / Staff Photographer
Police detain a young man on Chestnut St. between 52nd and 53rd sts. on Oct. 26, 2020. after a group was throwing object at police. The unrest occurred hours after police fatally shot Walter Wallace, Jr., a 27-year-old Black man.

Philadelphia police made 91 arrests Monday night amid civil unrest after police shot and killed Walter Wallace Jr., Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said Tuesday.

Outlaw said there were three citations for failure to disperse, 11 arrests for assault on police, and 76 arrests for burglary, including three burglaries with guns. Those arrest numbers may increase, she said, as investigations into the events continue.

There were 30 officers injured Monday night, including one sergeant who suffered a broken leg after “she was intentionally run over,” Outlaw said. The majority of the officers had “various cuts and bruises,” Outlaw said, because they were struck by projectiles. All but the sergeant were treated and released.

Outlaw said eight police vehicles and one fire department vehicle were damaged. One was set on fire and the rest were vandalized in other ways.

A protestor stands by a police car on fire near 52nd and Chestnut Street as police and people gathered hours after the police fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr. on Monday., October 26, 2020, in Philadelphia.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
A protestor stands by a police car on fire near 52nd and Chestnut Street as police and people gathered hours after the police fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr. on Monday., October 26, 2020, in Philadelphia.

The city has activated its emergency operations center, Outlaw said, and will increase officer presence in anticipation of more protests Tuesday.

Outlaw said the city has also requested mutual aid assistance from surrounding counties, and is preparing for the possibility that “there may be some bleeding together” of protests in the wake of Wallace’s killing and protests connected to Election Day and its aftermath —for which the police had already been working to prepare.

“This completely caught us off guard in the sense that, one, no one can predict that there’s an officer involved shooting,” Outlaw said. “And, two, once we arrived there we saw that there would be civil unrest.”

Laura McCrystal

2:27 PM - October 27, 2020
2:27 PM - October 27, 2020

Police commissioner says department will review policies related to mental health crises, work to get all officers tasers

A file photo of Philadelphia Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw at a press conference about the increased number of shootings in the City of Philadelphia, at the Police Administration Building in Philadelphia, on October 6, 2020.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
A file photo of Philadelphia Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw at a press conference about the increased number of shootings in the City of Philadelphia, at the Police Administration Building in Philadelphia, on October 6, 2020.

Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said Tuesday that the city will review policies in the wake of the police killing of Walter Wallace Jr., including improving responses to mental health crises and working to equip all officers with tasers.

Outlaw declined to provide specifics about the circumstances leading up to two officers fatally shooting Wallace on Monday, but said that the police would work to determine whether more details, including the officers' names, could be released within 48 hours as the investigation continues.

“I’m not going to Monday morning quarterback what happened here,” Outlaw said.

Chief Inspector Frank Vanore said the police did receive a call that there was a person armed with a knife, and said the police would work to determine more about what the responding officers knew when they arrived.

Outlaw did say that she learned upon starting her job in Philadelphia in January that not all officers have tasers, and said she had already determined that all officers needed to have them.

“It was made clear upon my arrival here that everyone needs to have a taser,” she said.

Another area of improvement, Outlaw said, is working on types of questions that 911 dispatchers ask callers to determine whether a situation is a mental health crisis and gather more information.

“Oftentimes when we are dispatched to calls we don’t have the full picture when we get there,” she said.

Outlaw said she spoke with Wallace’s family Monday evening, and planned to speak at a community meeting on Tuesday.

“While at the scene last night the anger and sadness of the community was not lost on me,” Outlaw said.

Laura McCrystal

2:20 PM - October 27, 2020
2:20 PM - October 27, 2020

Community activist Thomas Blackwell says Philadelphia police attacked him

Saj Purple Blackwell was in tears (facing camera) after learning her husband, Tommy Blackwell, was arrested while trying to pull kids out of unrest in West Philadelphia on October 27, 2020.
ELIZABETH ROBERTSON / Staff Photographer
Saj Purple Blackwell was in tears (facing camera) after learning her husband, Tommy Blackwell, was arrested while trying to pull kids out of unrest in West Philadelphia on October 27, 2020.

Community activist Thomas W. Blackwell VI was trying to get back to his West Philly home early Tuesday morning when he says Philadelphia police officers attacked him. Blackwell said police blocked his initial route.

“Gotta follow the law, and I will, cause ain’t nobody locking me up tonight,” Blackwell said on a Facebook Live. As Blackwell tried walking home through a different intersection, police stood in the way. He yelled across the street: “Y’all got our block blocked off. We can’t get on the block.”

Then, the video shows Blackwell lowering to the ground with his hands raised as a blur of police officers descended upon him. His camera dropped, but officers continue to come into the frame.

“They tackled me like I was Donovan McNabb losing the Super Bowl,” Blackwell said.

According to Blackwell, co-founder of the community advocacy organization Blackwell Culture Alliance, police hit his chin and chest with a baton and he fell to the ground. He tried to cover his head as police stomped on him, hitting him with shields and sticks. They didn’t stop, Blackwell said, until his neighbor, who was trying to help, was caught up in the beating and suffered a blow to his head from police.

“I could’ve died...They wouldn’t stop until someone was bleeding and their head was busted open,” Blackwell said. “It was almost like sport to them, the laughing, the carrying on after they beat someone.”

Officers caught on video can be seen finding Blackwell’s phone, saying “I think it was recording,” and then the feed ends. Blackwell says he was handcuffed, taken to the 18th and then 19th police districts, and police charged him with disorderly conduct. His wife then took him to the hospital so he could be treated for gashes and bruises to his legs and right hand. He still can’t walk on his left leg.

“I am a proud advocate for community and police relations,” Blackwell said, “but there are some major things that need to change within, beginning with systematic racism, because it reared its head tonight [Monday night], and right now, I am ashamed of our police department.”

Blackwell walked outside late Monday night because he was worried what happened earlier this summer would happen again — much-needed stores destroyed and use of excessive force by police.

Police did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

— Ellie Silverman

1:56 PM - October 27, 2020
1:56 PM - October 27, 2020

Police had been to the Walter Wallace Jr.'s home twice Monday before fatally shooting him on third visit, sources say

The scene on the 6100 block of Locust Street Oct. 26, 2020, after police officers fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
The scene on the 6100 block of Locust Street Oct. 26, 2020, after police officers fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr.

Philadelphia Police officers had responded to Walter Wallace Jr.'s home in West Philadelphia twice Monday for reports of disturbances before two officers returned on a third visit and fatally shot Wallace as he walked toward them with a knife, according to law enforcement sources.

Details about the prior visits — including their length, what happened, and which officers were involved — were not immediately clear. But the confirmation of the previous visits raises questions about what actions police took to try to help resolve the situation before the shooting.

The sources, who were not authorized to publicly discuss the visits, said officers had been called twice in the morning to respond to reports of domestic disturbances at the home in the 6100 block of Locust Street in West Philadelphia.

Chris Palmer, Mike Newall, and Mensah M. Dean

1:40 PM - October 27, 2020
1:40 PM - October 27, 2020

Mayor Kenney says he’s spoken with Wallace family, promises ‘speedy and transparent’ investigation

A file photo of Mayor Jim Kenney listening during a news conference at the city's Emergency Operations Center about protests in Philadelphia following the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
A file photo of Mayor Jim Kenney listening during a news conference at the city's Emergency Operations Center about protests in Philadelphia following the death of George Floyd on Saturday, May 30, 2020.

Mayor Jim Kenney said he spoke Monday night with the wife and parents of Walter Wallace Jr.

“I have children that age and I cannot imagine their heartbreak,” he said. “I promised them to continue to reach out and to hear their concerns.”

Kenney said the police investigation must have a “speedy and transparent resolution.”

He called the unrest in West Philadelphia on Monday night “further evidence of the anguish of Black and brown residents” in the city.

“I have lived my life as white man, enjoying all the privileges that brings,” Kenney said, vowing to work to understand the pain of systemic racism and work to change it.

“I know that many Philadelphians are feeling frustrated and outraged," Kenney said. “I fully support your first amendment rights to protest but we want to make sure that our communities are not further hurt as a result."

Laura McCrystal

1:31 PM - October 27, 2020
1:31 PM - October 27, 2020

On Walter Wallace Jr.'s block, expressions of grief and trauma: ‘It could have easily been any one of us.’

The scene on the 6100 block of Locust Street Oct. 26, 2020, after police officers fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
The scene on the 6100 block of Locust Street Oct. 26, 2020, after police officers fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr.

Less than 24 hours after police fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr., who was armed with a knife outside his Cobbs Creek home, family members mourned the 27-year-old father, son, and rap artist.

A woman who identified herself as Wallace’s cousin opened all the doors of her red Toyota and blasted Wallace’s rap song “WhoHe.” She cried in the street, and swayed to the lyrics about police violence, protests, and Black Lives Matter. Other family members leaned over the apartment’s porch railings, their eyes closed as the music swept through the neighborhood.

“Right here! They shot my cousin dead right here!” said the cousin, who declined to be named, as she pointed at the fading white chalk circles in the street from last night’s crime scene.

Sam White, 53, another cousin of Wallace’s, said the family is reeling, from first watching Wallace be fatally shot on the street and then from witnessing the unrest overnight.

“A young man is dead, killed by police officers who were supposed to protect and serve,” White said. “The whole block is traumatized.”

Cynthia Brooks, 63, who lives on the block, said she knows firsthand the difficulty of helping family members who suffer from mental illness.

“She was just trying to save her son,” said Brooks of Wallace Jr.'s mother, who was at the scene Monday begging police not to shoot and trying to make her son put down the knife. “It’s a shame that people have to die because of something that’s not their fault.”

“We walk the same walk as Walter,” said Chris Thomas, Brooks' son. “It could have easily been any one of us.”

"Everyone that was out here is traumatized,” he said of last night.

— Ellie Rushing and Mensah M. Dean

1:12 PM - October 27, 2020
1:12 PM - October 27, 2020

City council president calls for fair, expeditious investigation into officers' use of force

City Council President Darrell Clarke speaks during a news conference on Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
City Council President Darrell Clarke speaks during a news conference on Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020.

Darrell Clarke, president of Philadelphia City Council, called the death of Walter Wallace Jr., a Black man who was fatally shot Monday by Philadelphia Police, “a terrible tragedy,” and expressed sympathy for Wallace’s family, friends, and neighbors.

The officers' use of force warrants a fair, expeditious investigation,Clarke said, and the results of that investigation must be made public.

“I understand the frustration, anger and rage that boiled over last night in West Philadelphia,” Clarke said in a statement. “Our community is left with yet another police-involved shooting, a man dead, and the same questions that have arisen across the country: Was there a better way to handle this situation?”

He said it draws attention to the need for mental health crisis workers to respond to 911 calls with police officers, and advocated for the implementation of a Citizens Police Oversight Commission, which will be voted on next week.

“Until the investigations are complete and the results made known, we ask for peaceful protest in our city, not destruction of our neighborhoods,” Clarke said. “That only sets our city back.”

Erin McCarthy

1:00 PM - October 27, 2020
1:00 PM - October 27, 2020

Philadelphia school buildings close Tuesday in light of unrest

A file photo of the Philadelphia School District building.
ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ / Staff Photographer
A file photo of the Philadelphia School District building.

Philadelphia school buildings shut Tuesday in light of the unrest that occurred overnight, hours after police fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr.

District officials made the announcement that schools — closed to students due to the coronavirus, but open to principals and some support staff — would close “in light of current activities occurring throughout the city,” the school system announced on its Facebook page.

Schools open as early voting centers remain open, as does the district headquarters on North Broad Street.

— Kristen A. Graham

12:02 PM - October 27, 2020
12:02 PM - October 27, 2020

Cousin of Walter Wallace Jr. asks why police used force when they had been told he was experiencing a mental health crisis

Anthony Fitzhugh, who is a cousin of Walter Wallace Jr., talks outside the family’s home in Philadelphia, Pa. on October 27, 2020.
DAVID MAIALETTI / Staff Photographer
Anthony Fitzhugh, who is a cousin of Walter Wallace Jr., talks outside the family’s home in Philadelphia, Pa. on October 27, 2020.

The extended family of Walter Wallace Jr. gathered Tuesday morning at his parents' home in the 6100 block of Locust Street, where the fatal shooting took place Monday afternoon. Anthony Fitzhugh, a cousin, emerged from the home denouncing looting that had taken place overnight across the city, while accusing the police who killed Wallace of escalating the situation and wrongly “murdering” his cousin.

“They were advised that he had mental health issues," he said. “I understand he had a knife, and their job is to protect and serve. By all means do so, but do not let lethal force be the means by which you deescalate the situation. You could have still kept you gun drawn while another officer tased him.”

Wallace’s parents were too distraught to speak Tuesday morning, Fitzhugh said.

“They are never going to be the same again. They literally watched their son get murdered in the street," he said. “It didn’t have to happen that way. ... At what point do you draw a line and say, ‘OK, I’m going over a limit. This no longer falls under my job description, this is murder'?”

On Monday night, Walter Wallace Sr, the father of Walter Wallace Jr., talked about the fatal shooting of his son on the 6100 block of Locust St. Oct. 26. 2020.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
On Monday night, Walter Wallace Sr, the father of Walter Wallace Jr., talked about the fatal shooting of his son on the 6100 block of Locust St. Oct. 26. 2020.

Fitzhugh, 49, who did not witness the shooting but arrived shortly afterward, said a relative called the police because Wallace was experiencing a mental health crisis. He said Wallace suffered from bipolar disorder, among other conditions for which he was taking medication.

“I just don’t understand the fact that, the first thing that comes to [the police officers’] mind is, ‘shoot, kill.’ And then the amount of shots,” he said. But “I’m not in agreement with all of the rioting and looting.”

“That’s not being done in his name, that’s not being done in his honor," Fitzhugh added, “and the family does not agree with that.”

Mensah M. Dean

11:20 AM - October 27, 2020
11:20 AM - October 27, 2020

Trump administration is ‘prepared to deploy federal law enforcement if necessary’

A caravan of Pennsylvania National Guard travel east on Spring Garden to N. 2nd St. on Tuesday, June 2, 2020. They were sent to the city in June during protests of the police killing of George Floyd, a Black man, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ / Staff Photographer
A caravan of Pennsylvania National Guard travel east on Spring Garden to N. 2nd St. on Tuesday, June 2, 2020. They were sent to the city in June during protests of the police killing of George Floyd, a Black man, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

White House officials said Tuesday they are monitoring the unrest that has erupted in West Philadelphia after police fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr. and are prepared to deploy federal resources to the city if warranted.

Speaking Tuesday morning on Fox & Friends, White House communications director Alyssa Farah said President Donanld Trump intends to let the investigation into the Wallace’s death play out.

But she added: “I want to make one thing clear: President Trump will not tolerate any violence directed at America’s law enforcement."

The Trump administration deployed Homeland Security agents and U.S. Marshals to protect federal property in cities like Portland and Seattle during racial justice protests this spring. However, the administration did not follow through on threats at the time to take a similar approach in Philadelphia. The proposition drew sharp rebukes from Mayor Jim Kenney and District Attorney Larry Krasner.

Asked Tuesday, whether the White House would wait for Kenney to request assistance or send federal agents on their own, Farrah referred questions to the Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security.

“This president has made clear before — whether it was in Seattle, or Portland, or others — we’re prepared to deploy federal law enforcement if necessary,” she said. “So, I’m sure those conversations are ongoing now.”

As of Tuesday morning, the president himself had not publicly addressed Wallace’s death or the protests that have occurred after.

— Jeremy Roebuck and Rob Tornoe

10:15 AM - October 27, 2020
10:15 AM - October 27, 2020

Photos: Cleanup begins in West Philly

- Inquirer staff photographers

10:00 AM - October 27, 2020
10:00 AM - October 27, 2020

Photos: Photos from the first hours of tragedy, unrest in Philadelphia

Inquirer staff photographers

9:53 AM - October 27, 2020
9:53 AM - October 27, 2020

Recap: Tense overnight protests after police shoot and kill Walter Wallace Jr.

Police tackle a man they were chasing at 52nd St. and Locust on October 27, 2020. The unrest came after Phila. police shot and killed Walter Wallace Jr. in West Phila. just hours earlier.
ELIZABETH ROBERTSON / Staff Photographer
Police tackle a man they were chasing at 52nd St. and Locust on October 27, 2020. The unrest came after Phila. police shot and killed Walter Wallace Jr. in West Phila. just hours earlier.

Police officers fatally shot Walter Wallace Jr., a 27-year-old Black man armed with a knife, during a confrontation Monday afternoon in West Philadelphia, an incident that quickly raised tensions in the neighborhood and sparked a standoff that lasted deep into the night.

Late Monday into early Tuesday, police struggled to respond to vandalism and looting along the commercial corridor of 52nd Street, an area that was the scene of clashes between police and protestors earlier this summer. At least one police vehicle was set on fire Monday night and destroyed

By morning, an officer was hospitalized in stable condition with a broken leg after being struck by a pickup truck, police said. About 29 other officers suffered mostly minor injuries from being struck by rocks, bricks, and other projectiles, police said in a preliminary report.

Authorities detained 10 people overnight near 55th and Pine Street, police said, and those people were set to be released pending possible charges of assaulting police or rioting. Police said officers arrested about 20 people in relation to looting at various stores in West Philadelphia, University City, Overbrook Park, and Center City, some of which were not near the protest.

Six law enforcement vehicles were also vandalized, police said.

Ellie Rushing, Anna Orso, Robert Moran, and Samantha Melamed

9:42 AM - October 27, 2020
9:42 AM - October 27, 2020

Recap: What happened in Cobbs Creek before police fatally shot Walter Wallace, Jr.

Walter Wallace Jr. in a 2018 family photo. He was fatally shot by police officers in the 6100 block of Locust Street Oct. 26, 2020.
Family Photo
Walter Wallace Jr. in a 2018 family photo. He was fatally shot by police officers in the 6100 block of Locust Street Oct. 26, 2020.

Shortly before 4 p.m., police said, two officers responded to the 6100 block of Locust Street after a report of a man with a knife. Family members identified him as Walter Wallace Jr.

A video posted on social media showed Wallace walking toward the officers and police backing away. The video swings briefly out of view at the moment the gunfire erupts but he appeared to be multiple feet from them when they fired numerous shots.

Police spokesperson Sgt. Eric Gripp said the officers had ordered Wallace to drop the weapon, and he “advanced towards the officers.” Gripp said investigators are reviewing footage of what happened. Both officers were wearing body cameras.

He said both officers fired “several times.” After the man was shot, he fell to the ground, and Gripp said one of the officers drove him to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, where he died.

Walter Wallace Sr., the man’s father, said his son appeared to have been shot 10 times.

“Why didn’t they use a Taser?” the senior Wallace asked outside a family residence on the block. “His mother was trying to defuse the situation.”

He said his son struggled with mental health issues and was on medication. “He has mental issues,” Wallace said. “Why you have to gun him down?”

Ellie Rushing, Anna Orso, Robert Moran, and Samantha Melamed