Taleon Goffney had a lot of down time to write the strange-but-true story of his life of crime and pornography - six years in prison to be exact.

Now, the man who once worked with his twin brother on gay porn films and on intricate rooftop heists, has released his story in a book called "ON MY SEARCH FOR A BETTER LIFE THIS IS HOW I BECAME ... INFAMOUS."

The book, which has been published by Xlibris, is authored by "Kent T. Jackson," a pseudonym Goffney, 32, said he had to use to "get through a lot of red tape."

"I don't know why I picked that name, I just had to come up with something," he said. "I didn't want no cheesy name. I thought Kent was smooth."

Goffney, whose bizarre saga came to light in 2008 when he and his brother were arrested for a series of rooftop burglaries, regrets both his life of crime as a drug dealer and thief and his time in the porn industry, where he performed in films with his twin brother under the names Keyon and Teyon. He said he penned his life story in prison because he didn't want all of his bad decision to be for nothing.

"It needs to count for something, if I can use my story to warn somebody, I want to do that," he said. "I don't have a lot of money like before but I have a lot of peace now."

Goffney told me he's currently going to school to become an HVAC technician.

"I just want to be proof that anybody can change," he said. "I'm doing everything opposite of what they thought I would do. Even my parole officer said 'I'm proud of you.'"

You know, I'm often asked what have been my favorite stories to cover during my time as a journalist. Taleon and Keyontyli's wild journey always makes the top ten because it's a story you couldn't make up. I feel sorry for fiction writers that the bar for the bizarre has been set so high by people like the Goffneys.

When I interviewed Taleon earlier this year after his release from prison, it was the first time I had seen him in person, outside of a courtroom. I was pleasantly surprised by his polite demeanor, his open honesty and his sincere desire to better himself.

He was also a quote machine, offering up gems like this: "The money be so clean sometimes it look white" and "We were from Camden, we'd never seen a horse before. It was like a unicorn to us."

Goffney has a story to tell, that's for sure. If you'd like to read his memoir you can pick up a copy on the Xlibris site right now. In 30 days, the book is slated to be available online at Barnes & Noble and Amazon, Goffney said.