The New York Daily News has long been a beacon of journalistic integrity, mixing news with opinion in the most delicate, dignified manner possible. They are the moral compass not just for the great city of New York, but of the entire country, and dare I say... Earth? So when they speak, you can bet your bottom I listen, ladies and gentlemen.

On Saturday, the New York Daily News' Mitch Abramson took extreme offense at a cartoon created and published by the Philadelphia Eagles mocking the New York Giants' Eli Manning. We'll post the video below, but be forewarned -- the following video is disgustingly offensive, and should not be viewed by children or people prone to fainting:

For those of you who are not inclined to watch filth, Abramson bravely detailed the abhorrent video:

(T)he Eagles video starts off with Manning's character in hip-hop mode, saying, "Ah yeah, Little Eli is in the house," holding up his hand for emphasis. "What's up Philly, you want some of this? I don't think you heard me."

Then the lights go out and the video takes a grim turn.

Grim. Real grim. Abramson expounded:

At the end of the tape, Manning is shown walking aimlessly around the dark with a wedgie and his jersey pulled over his head as if he was a helpless high school freshman getting duped by an upperclassman.

While the video is meant to be in jest and part of the passion-play rivalry that exists between the two teams, now is probably not the best time to show football players beating on each other.

Not with the image of Ray Rice cold-cocking his then fiancée in a casino elevator still fresh in people's minds.

And not with revelations that some football players at Sayreville War Memorial High School allegedly were violating their teammates under the coach's nose, forcing the season to be called off.

Clearly, the above cartoon is the exact same thing as Ray Rice punching his girlfriend in the face and the alleged rape that occurred at Sayreville War Memorial High School.

I also agree with Abramson's hinting that much larger sweeping changes must occur. It's probably best that the NFL cancel the NFL season, so as not to see "football players beating on each other."

New York Daily News Giants beat writer Ralph Vacchiano strongly backed Abramson's piece via Twitter:

Sooooooo tasteless.

Vacchiano is no stranger to writing about bullying. Giants cornerback Prince Amukamara was once the victim of bullying at the hands of his teammates.

Asked if (the bullying) worked, Amukamara first said, "I don't think it fazed me at all." But the truth is, his "swag" eventually came out and he became a more aggressive player. So in some ways, he admitted, the hazing worked exactly as his teammates had hoped.

In the letter from St. Paul to the Ephesians, the Bible specifically says, "It is not OK to depict bullying in a football cartoon. However, if actual real-life bullying occurs but it leads to more 'swag,' it's defensible." Obviously, Vacchiano knows that Bible verse all too well.

If there's one criticism I have of Abramson's piece, it's that they may have missed some of the other obvious heinous comparisons that could be drawn from the cartoon.

The Eagles are subtly promoting gang violence

In the cartoon, Eli Manning is clearly flashing a gang sign:

A closer look:

Does that look familiar? It should:

Hypocrites.

Anagrams

An anagram is a type of word play, the result of rearranging the letters of a word or phrase to produce a new word or phrase. In the cartoon, the Eagles diabolically used anagrams to spew their filth.

The satanic looking Eagles players featured in the video are Bennie Logan, Fletcher Cox, Brandon Graham, Cedric Thornton, and Malcolm Jenkins. You might think the Eagles simply featured some of their better players on defense. Wrong. Those players all have names that have either sexual or drug anagrams:

Fletcher Cox: "Ex Crotch Elf"

Bennie Logan: "Wine Ale Bong"

Brandon Graham: "Bang Roman Hard"

Cedric Thornton: "Orchid Corn Tent"

Malcolm Jenkins: "Men In Jocks Mall"

"Orchid Corn Tent?" I don't know what that's supposed to mean, but you thoroughly disgust me, Eagles.

The Eagles' depictions of Eli Manning being bullied by the Eagles have been going on longer than you think

Last year, in fact, the Eagles published a cartoon in which none of the Eagles players (not even Eagles radio play-by-play man Merrill Reese) would give Eli candy for Halloween:

No candy? Tasteless, once again.

Follow Jimmy on Twitter: @JimmyKempski