LOS ANGELES - Californians got a lot of what they wanted and not too much of what they didn't from a major storm that finally blew out of the state Friday.

After drenching Northern California the previous day, the storm dumped up to 5 inches of desperately needed rain in Southern California. A landslide left 10 homes uninhabitable and fire officials executed a dramatic rescue of two people from the Los Angeles River.

There were traffic tie-ups, street flooding, and wind gusts up to 60 m.p.h. in some areas. At its height, about 50,000 customers lost power, though most had it back quickly.

Still, with few exceptions, damage across the region was minor and the soaking was welcome in a state withered by three years of drought. No serious injuries were reported.

As the storm crept down the coast overnight, its powerful winds caused power outages around Santa Barbara, where the National Weather Service said up to 5 inches fell in coastal mountains. Amtrak suspended service between Los Angeles and San Luis Obispo.

In Camarillo, a Ventura County city about 50 miles northwest of Los Angeles, rain was falling at about an inch an hour over hillsides ravaged by a 2013 wildfire. With few roots to hold the soil in place, and a waxy subsurface layer caused by heat from the flames, the deluge caused part of a hillside to give way.

Debris brushed aside concrete barriers crews had set up on the slope and surrounded about a dozen homes with silt, sticks, and rocks. The force was so great that two earthmovers used to set up barriers were swept down to the street.

Ten homes were red-tagged, meaning authorities believed they were too damaged for residents to return.

Earthen avalanches also blocked part of the Pacific Coast Highway in Ventura County.

Near downtown Los Angeles, the fire department rescued two people from the storm-swollen Los Angeles River. Orange County fire officials and Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies each pulled a body from smaller waterways, though in both cases the cause of death wasn't clear.

Even after the fast-moving storm cleared out, the risk remained that sodden topsoil on wildfire-scarred hillsides could collapse.

A debris flow sent rocks and bricks down streets in suburban Glendora east of Los Angeles. The threat of slides in several other inland Southern California areas led to some evacuations.

It was the second major storm in a week for Southern California. Still, weather experts say many more such storms are needed to pull the state out of drought.