Dear Dave,

My parents are going through a divorce, and money issues are a big part of the problem. My dad bought several rental properties and poured money into them. Then, he lost them to foreclosure and isn't making a lot in his new, commission-based job. How can I, as a 25-year-old kid, tell him that his career choices aren't working?

Ryan

Dear Ryan,

I'm sorry to hear about your mom and dad. Divorce is never an easy thing, no matter how old you are.

You've probably heard lots of old sayings about how winners never quit. Well, in many cases those are false statements. Winners and successful people quit all the time; they quit doing things that aren't working. This doesn't have to mean that you quit on a dream, but it could mean you change the methodology you're using — especially if it's not getting you anywhere.

Part of being a successful entrepreneur is having the ability to recognize when something isn't working and change it. You sound like a smart, caring young man, but there's little chance that a twenty-something with very little life experience will be able to convince his father of these things. I mean, he's probably in his fifties, right? Plus, he's going through a divorce, and it sounds like he's broke and emotionally worn out.

You've got a great heart, and I'm glad you care enough about your dad to try and help him. But in this scenario, I think he needs to talk to someone like a pastor, or even an older relative or good friend closer to his own age — a guy with a little more life experience. Maybe you could talk to someone like this and explain what your dad is going through. Ask them to talk to him, and see if he'll open up to some new ideas.

In the meantime, just be there for him and show all the support you can. You're a good son, Ryan.

-Dave

Dave Ramsey is America's trusted voice on money and business. He has authored five New York Times best-selling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover, EntreLeadership and Smart Money Smart Kids. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.

I’m debt-free except for my home, and I’ll have that paid off in about 12 months. I currently make $60,000 a year and live in an area of Florida that is designated a flood plain,

because a river that empties into Tampa Bay runs behind my home. Currently, I’m paying $1,070 a month for flood insurance. My house is worth $325,000, and water has only come up into

the yard twice in over 20 years. Since I’m doing pretty well financially, do you think I need to keep my flood insurance policy?

Trudy

Dear Trudy,

From what you’ve told me about the history of your property, it sounds like your biggest concern might be if a hurricane caused a backwash in your area. Insurance is already pretty

tough in Florida when it comes to those kinds of things, but you don’t want to run the risk of your house getting mowed down and losing everything.

If I were in your shoes, I think I’d like the protection of flood insurance. What you’re paying for the policy is such a small percentage of your world, compared to the value of your

home and your income. Keep the coverage, Trudy!