3-D LASER lights, drive-in movies and sports complexes don't usually mix, though they sound as if they should, don't they? This weekend, the three converge for a multimedia music experience, "Laser Light Show," in a parking lot near Citizens Bank Park. With more than 10 acclaimed DJs performing house and electronica music, plus live rock bands, this event will make tremendous noise. Headliner DJ Scotto is producer of one of New York's first electronica dance-music events, Nocturnal Audio Sensory Awakening (a/k/a/ N.A.S.A), and the creator of the Ravestock festival. DJ Scotto's talent also is showcased in the two films being screened in outdoor settings — one of them a pop-up drive-in theater that will accommodate about 100 cars.

"Limelight" stars 50 Cent, Jay-Z and Moby. "Party Monster" stars Macaulay Culkin and Seth Green.

But the biggest draw may be the lasers and their free-space holography. "To see the holograms, you do not need 3-D glasses," said Matt Falcone, production manager for P.A.W.N. Lasers. "The lasers make holograms above the crowd which float in the air. We're the only movie theater in the world with Laser Digital 3-D free space holography."

P.A.W.N. Lasers have provided special effects for the Detroit Electronic Music Festival, Miami's Ultra Music Festival, and New York Fashion Week's Rock 'n' Republic Show. During Saturday's event, P.A.W.N.'s Laser Space Cannons should be visible well beyond the immediate area. Holiday Inn parking lot, 900 Packer Ave., 3 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, $20 general admission, $65 a carload, laserlightshow.org.

— Amanda Wagner

SMALL STREETS, BIG CITY

Join the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia for an architectural walking tour through the labyrinth of streets west of Washington Square on Saturday. "Little Streets East of Broad" explores these 19th-century neighborhoods and the social structure that generated variety among residential units and blocks. The range of structures — from architecturally significant homes built on wide streets to smaller-scale houses on tiny alleys — reflect early city planning for upper, middle and lower classes. Though looking at the past, the tour will offer insight into the present and future of Philadelphia neighborhoods. Volunteer tour guides share a passion and knowledge of our streets and what makes Philly a livable city. "Little Streets" is one in a large series of tours in and around Philadelphia that run through October.

Kahn Park, 11th and Pine streets, 2 p.m. Saturday, $8-$10, 215-546-1180, preservationalliance.com.

— Alyssa Stein

Art Attack is a partnership with Drexel University and is supported by a grant from the Knight/NEA Community Arts Journalism Challenge, administered by the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance.