Brian Davis, 33, of Philadelphia, and the Rev. Richard Cobb, 57, of Brookhaven, Delaware County, were arrested yesterday on multiple theft-related charges, police said.

Posing as a Licenses and Inspections inspector and acting at Cobb's direction, Davis allegedly collected more than $10,000 from the owner of a property on Wayne Avenue near Queen Lane, in Germantown. Cobb is a pastor at St. Mark's Baptist Church, in South Philadelphia.

POLICE BELIEVE WOMAN WAS KILLED IN LOT

Police yesterday were still searching for the killer of Iris Tyson, a 23-year-old South Philly woman who was found dead Sunday morning in an overgrown, weedy lot near boarded-up homes between Sydenham and Hicks streets, just north of Federal, in Point Breeze.

Homicide Capt. James Clark said yesterday that Tyson's pants were pulled down when police found her and that they believe she was killed in the lot.

Tyson was reported missing by her family on Mother's Day. She had left the home she shared with her parents to get her mother a card about 1 p.m. that day, but didn't return, her father has said.

125 YEARS IN PRISON FOR DOUBLE MURDER

An Egg Harbor Township, N.J., man was sentenced yesterday to 125 years in state prison for the murder of his girlfriend and her mother in 2009.

According to the Atlantic County Prosecutor's Office, Nicholas Nigro, III, 27, shot Maryjane Buri, 48, and her daughter Paula Mulder, 21, on Sept. 30, 2009. He was convicted last month.

In a statement, Nigro told authorities he killed Buri first so that Mulder could see the murder.

IN OTHER NEWS:

INSANITY DEFENSE FOR SKYLER'S ALLEGED KILLER?

A Souderton man charged with raping and killing his 9-year-old neighbor is "sad" and "confused" over his arrest in the girl's death, and may pursue an insanity defense, his attorney said yesterday.

James Troutman, 24, reports having the social disorder Asperger's syndrome, the attorney said. By itself, the malady falls far short of the rigorous standard needed for an insanity defense in Pennsylvania.

"It creates boundary problems, but it doesn't absolve him from knowing right from wrong," attorney Craig Penglase said. "[But] there may be additional mental-health issues involved."

- Staff and wire reports