As we count the days up to Christmas Day, meteorologist John Bolaris is assessing the Philadelphia region's chances for a white Christmas. The graphic above will be updated each and every day based on the forecast.

We've had a decent amount of snow already but will we get more for the big day?

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the historical probability of a white Christmas (at least 1 inch of snow on the ground on Dec. 25, by its definition) in the Philadelphia region is about 11 to 25 percent. (See map on climate.gov)

Using the same minimum inch of previous or fresh snow on Dec. 25 criteria, the Philadelphia region has recorded just 10 White Christmases since 1951, according to National Weather Service historical data. The Snowy Sixties were the most prolific (with six), while the Seventies and Eighties failed to produce even one white Christmas.

1959 - 1 inch (on the ground before Christmas Eve)

1960 - 1 inch (most on the ground before Christmas Eve)

1961 - 2 inches (nearly all on the ground before Christmas Eve)

1962 - 1.5 inches (fell on Christmas Day)

1963 - 5 inches (with just trace amounts of snow falling Christmas Eve and Christmas Day)

1966 - 12 inches (12.4 inches of snow fell during a Christmas Eve storm)

1969 - 4.1 inches (fell on Christmas Day)

1998 - 1 inch (with a half-inch falling Christmas Eve)

2002 - 1.2 inches (fell on Christmas Day)

2009 - 8 inches (all on the ground prior to Christmas Eve)