CLEVELAND

- Ariel Castro, a 52-year-old former school bus driver, was charged with four counts of kidnapping - covering three captive women and the daughter born to one of them - and three counts of rape, against all three women.

The women, now in their 20s and 30s, vanished separately between 2002 and 2004. At the time, they were 14, 16 and 20 years old.

Prosecutors brought no charges against Castro's two brothers, who were arrested along with him on Monday, saying there was no evidence they had any part in the crime.

Castro owns the run-down home where the women were rescued on Monday after one of them, Amanda Berry, broke through a screen door to freedom while he was away. The discovery electrified Cleveland, where many people had come to believe the missing young women were dead.

Police also said a paternity test on Castro was being done to establish who fathered Berry's 6-year-old daughter.

At a news conference, authorities would not discuss the circumstances of the women's kidnappings or give further details about their ordeals. But City Councilman Brian Cummins said: "We know that the victims have confirmed miscarriages, but with who, how many and what conditions we don't know."

Neighbors said that over the years, Castro took part in the search for one of the women, Gina DeJesus, helped pass out fliers, performed music at a fundraiser for her and attended a candlelight vigil, at which he comforted her mother.

None of the women said anything that indicated Castro's brothers, Pedro Castro, 54, and Onil Castro, 50, were involved, Tomba said.

"Ariel kept everyone at a distance," he said.

A court hearing for Ariel Castro was set for this morning.