UNITED NATIONS - The head of the U.N. agency promoting equality for women is lamenting that a girl born today will be an 81-year-old grandmother before she has the same chance as a man to be CEO of a company - and she will have to wait until she's 50 years old to have an equal chance to lead a country.

Twenty years after 189 countries adopted a blueprint to achieve equality for women, Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka said in an interview that not a single country has reached gender parity and equality.

The executive director of U.N. Women spoke ahead of International Women's Day on Friday and next week's meeting of the Commission on the Status of Women. The commission will review the 150-page platform for action to achieve equality that was adopted at the groundbreaking U.N. women's conference in Beijing in 1995. Then-U.S. first lady Hillary Clinton inspired delegates and women worldwide when she declared in a keynote speech: "Human rights are women's rights and women's rights are human rights."

Although there has been progress since Beijing, especially in women's health and girls' education, Mlambo-Ngcuka said, there are fewer than 20 female heads of state and government, and the number of women lawmakers has increased from 11 percent to just 22 percent in the last two decades.

"We just don't have critical mass to say that post-Beijing women have reached a tipping point in their representation," she said.

She said the underrepresentation of women in decision-making and violence against women are "global phenomena," a result of male domination in the world that needs to change if women are ever to be truly equal.

The Beijing platform called for governments to end discrimination against women and close the gender gap in 12 critical areas including health, education, employment, politics, and human rights.