Happy Friday, Philly. Hope you like snow, because we're about to get some more. Look out for icy roads and snow on your evening commute. Not into it? Turn on this playlist, it might just put you in the holiday spirit.

If you like what you're reading, tell your friends it's free to sign up to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday. I would love to hear your thoughts, ideas, and feedback, so please email me, tweet me @aubsn, or reach our social team on Facebook. Thank you for reading.

— Aubrey Nagle

Jim Finley, a retired forestry professor and founder of Penn State’s Center for Private Forests, walks his entire property every spring looking for invasive plants.
Jason Nark / Staff
Jim Finley, a retired forestry professor and founder of Penn State’s Center for Private Forests, walks his entire property every spring looking for invasive plants.

Nearly three-quarters of Pennsylvania's forestland, which covers more than half the state, is privately owned. Hundreds of acres of it are lost each day.

But it's not loggers and lethal pests the woodlands have to worry about. It's parcelization — the divvying up of properties into smaller and smaller bits by aging owners. Don't miss reporter Jason Nark's special report on what's next for Pennsylvania's forestland.

Yesterday the Federal Communications Commission voted along party lines to deregulate the internet and roll back Obama-era net neutrality protections. The protections had stopped telecom companies (like Comcast and Verizon, which lobbied hard for the repeal) from throttling internet traffic and blocking websites.

So what's next? The decision will likely lead to challenges in federal court (New York's attorney general already plans to lead a multistate lawsuit) and some say Republicans and Democrats may come together to regulate the internet with new legislation.

The decision comes after the FCC's public comment system has been criticized for being flooded with fake comments and emails.

City Council approved a controversial bill yesterday that instructs the Department of Licenses and Inspections to regulate "the use or removal of any physical barrier" like bullet-resistant windows in large food establishments.

This means the beer delis, which are required to have at least 30 seats for customers and sell food in order to sell alcohol, may need to remove their windows. Many beer deli owners, who are largely Asian American, oppose the bill because they say without their windows they could be killed.

Supporters of the bill include African American residents who say beer delis prey on black and brown communities and sow distrust. Mayor Jim Kenney is expected to sign the bill.

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December 15, 2017
Signe Wilkinson
December 15, 2017
"In a #MeToo age, it's as though your hashtag should be #MeNeither. Where are the women?" Regional columnist Maria Panaritis compares the
— lack of female feedback she received after her debut column

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Your Daily Dose of | Celebration

The country’s oldest polar bear turned 37 at the Philadelphia Zoo Wednesday, and yes, there was birthday “cake.”