Welcome to Wednesday, friends. There's plenty to catch up on this morning, including sobering updates from yesterday's shooting in California and fresh accusations against Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams. Take a deep breath and dive in but don't skip the happier fare. A few tales of local do-gooders restored my faith in humanity for the day.

If you like what you're reading, it's free to sign up to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday. I would love to hear your thoughts, ideas, and feedback, so please email me, tweet me @aubsn, or reach our social team on Facebook.

— Aubrey Nagle

Burleigh Hall at Cheyney University.
Michael Bryant
Burleigh Hall at Cheyney University.

Cheyney University, the nation's oldest black college, is failing. Enrollment is plummeting, and the students that do attend are left riddled with debt. Fewer than 20 percent go on to graduate within six years.

Can the school survive? Alumni have rallied to save it, but if the school's accreditation is revoked in a hearing Thursday, the 180-year-old school would almost certainly close.

So, where did it all go wrong? An Inquirer and Daily News investigation into years of court records, audits, interviews, and federal data tell a grim story of mismanagement. Failing to open thousands of student applications and mishandling millions in federal grants are just the tip of the iceberg.

A National Transportation Safety Board investigation lambasted Amtrak after it found 20 safety violations that led to the fatal crash in Chester in April 2016. Two workers were killed as a result, and 39 people on the train were injured.

The NTSB said Amtrak created a culture of fear among employees that led to lax safety measures. If not safety, what was Amtrak's priority? On-time performance.

The damning report follows a few years under the spotlight for Amtrak, after the 2015 derailment of one of its trains in Philadelphia killed eight. That accident drew attention to an automated speed control system that could have prevented it. Called Positive Train Control, that technology was in place where the Chester crash happened.

A surprising revelationand another crime scenegreet a detective chasing a manipulative gunman. The third chapter in David Gambacorta's five-part series "Undercover Gangster" is now available.

Need to catch up?

What you need to know today

» READ MORE: #OurPhilly

We want to see what our community looks like through your eyes. Show us the park that your family walks through every weekend with the dog, the block party in your neighborhood or the historic stretch you see every morning on your commute to work.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we'll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out to build those followers!

That’s Interesting

Opinions

November 15, 2017
Signe Wilkinson
November 15, 2017
"People who are 'dealing marijuana' are essentially running small-scale wholesale-to-retail delivery services, almost like farm-to-plate." Philly420 columnist
— Chris Goldstein outlines the four

What we’re reading

Your Daily Dose of | Creativity

Bonnie Paul from Hunting Valley looks over some of the broken instruments at Temple University as musicians were picking up the instruments they will be using for the Symphony for a Broken Orchestra.
STEVEN M. FALK / Staff Photographer
Bonnie Paul from Hunting Valley looks over some of the broken instruments at Temple University as musicians were picking up the instruments they will be using for the Symphony for a Broken Orchestra.

A Pulitzer Prize-winning composer wrote a symphony for hundreds of broken instruments from local schools to raise funds to fix them. Because writing a symphony for regular instruments just wasn't a challenge anymore.