Welcome to Wednesday, Philadelphia. If you've spent the last week devastated by the separation of children from their families at the U.S. border, you are certainly not alone. Many protesters joined a rally in Rittenhouse Square yesterday to voice their opposition to the policy causing the mass separations while VP Mike Pence was in town. Meanwhile, down the Shore (which could be another planet, considering how incredibly different these stories are) other young people are living it up for Senior Week in Wildwood. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the town has a love-hate relationship with the rowdy tradition. And by the way, it will be warm again today, but not so humid.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

Ethan Schiller (left), 4, and his brother Lukas, 2-1/2, look over the dozens of shoes representing children who were separated from their parents by immigration officials, part of a protest at Rittenhouse Square on Tuesday.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
Ethan Schiller (left), 4, and his brother Lukas, 2-1/2, look over the dozens of shoes representing children who were separated from their parents by immigration officials, part of a protest at Rittenhouse Square on Tuesday.

Hundreds of protesters joined a rally at Rittenhouse Square Tuesday afternoon to protest the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy at the southern U.S. border, which has separated more than 2,000 immigrant children from their families. The location was no coincidence; Vice President Mike Pence was attending a fundraiser nearby.

Images and recordings of children crying in detention centers after being taken from their parents have provoked national outcry. The governors of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware have all opposed sending troops to the border due to the policy.

Two-thirds of Americans oppose the separations, which the president has falsely and repeatedly blamed on existing laws. The surge in separations follows a Justice Department policy announced in April.

Each year at just about this time, thousands of teenagers flock to the Shore to celebrate their high school graduations. The gatherings dot every beach town, but Wildwood is its, well, wild epicenter.

Senior Week is typically a parent-free, loud-music-filled, alcohol-fueled affair that can be best described by residents as a "necessary evil." Rental owners abhor renters' sometimes destructive tendencies and business owners love the extra cash.

But the teens don't just go on spending sprees; they bring in money for underage drinking and noise violations, too.

Stephen Lett is a member of the small governing body that runs the Jehovah's Witnesses. When he has weighed in on coverage of the organization's widespread child sex abuse problems from Australia to Pennsylvania, it's largely been to deny there are problems at all.

Some ex-Witnesses claim the organization knows its molestation issues run deep and refuse to meaningfully address them. One victim, Chessa Manion, says she has a letter from Lett that backs her up.

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Suffer the Children
Signe Wilkinson
Suffer the Children
"I see America once again treating brown children as objects to be used and manipulated, and I am appalled. Not because I see what is happening to other people, but because I am watching a repetition of what happened to my own." — Columnist Solomon Jones on families being separated at the U.S. border 153 years after slavery was abolished in Texas.

What we’re reading

Glen Ellsworth III and his son, Glen Ellsworth IV, show off a captured timber rattlesnake at their home in Sweet Valley, Pa., on Saturday, June 16, 2018. The two were looking for rattlesnakes and other types of snakes to enter in the annual Noxen Rattlesnake Roundup.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Glen Ellsworth III and his son, Glen Ellsworth IV, show off a captured timber rattlesnake at their home in Sweet Valley, Pa., on Saturday, June 16, 2018. The two were looking for rattlesnakes and other types of snakes to enter in the annual Noxen Rattlesnake Roundup.

Your Daily Dose of | Snakes

"Some are friendly as hell, and some are just nasty." To hunters who join snake roundups for fundraisers and family entertainment, Pennsylvania's venomous rattlesnakes are just like dogs.