Welcome to Monday, Philadelphia. Surprise, surprise, it's still raining in much of the region this morning, there are flood advisories in effect in South Jersey, Philly, and its surrounding counties, and I-76 was closed this morning due to flooding. Speaking of the 'burbs, we're kicking off a week of news today with a look at how populations are growing (or not growing) nearby. It may come as no surprise that migration patterns around here are driven by two big generations: millennials and Baby Boomers. Their preferences are shaping the region and affecting the economy. Also sure to affect the economy: President Trump's weekend with the Group of Seven and subsequent Twitter beef with Canadian Prime Minster Justin Trudeau. Catch up on the international news below as the President readies for an historic summit with North Korea's Kim Jong Un.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

Just a few miles apart, Upper Providence (Montgomery County, left) and Phoenixville (Chester County, right) have both grown in population. But different families are moving in. New homes in Upper Providence are larger, surrounded by more space; younger families are moving into denser, smaller homes in Phoenixville.
David Swanson / Staff Photographer
Just a few miles apart, Upper Providence (Montgomery County, left) and Phoenixville (Chester County, right) have both grown in population. But different families are moving in. New homes in Upper Providence are larger, surrounded by more space; younger families are moving into denser, smaller homes in Phoenixville.

Congratulations, Chester and Montgomery Counties, you're on the up and up  in terms of population growth, that is. The latest Census Bureau data, released late last month, has revealed some interesting patterns about how our region is changing.

For starters, millennials that are starting families are moving towards the denser suburbs (think Downingtown, Collingswood) while older families look for larger homes in Montco and Chesco.

Meanwhile, Baby Boomers looking to retire are fleeing tax-unfriendly South Jersey. What effect will this all have on the region? Every change impacts the economy.

It's been 50 years since the first gay pride parade was held in New York City to commemorate the anniversary of the Stonewall riots. Philly joined the party in 1972, but didn't hold an annual event until 1988.

So, yesterday the region's LGBTQ community descended upon the Gayborhood to begin its parade down to Penn's Landing in honor of the 30th annual PrideDay.

Cities around the world joined this weekend's celebrations, too. In Tel Aviv, 250,000 people took part in a pride parade Friday, while thousands marched Saturday in Poland and Romania where same-sex couples aren't legally recognized.

Late tonight (well, tomorrow morning in Singapore) President Trump will meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to settle a standoff over Pyongyang's nuclear arsenal. How the historic talks between the two leaders will turn out is impossible to predict, especially considering Trump has said he's eschewing preparation for instinct.

But before he landed in Singapore Sunday, Trump courted controversy with ally leaders by refusing to sign the Group of Seven's joint statement and starting a war of words with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau over trade tariffs. Afterwards, in Europe, Trump's defense secretary Jim Mattis offered reassurances to America's allies.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

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That’s Interesting

Opinions

June 10, 2018
Signe Wilkinson
June 10, 2018
"Whatever you would have done during the other great moral crises that have afflicted our modern world — the Holocaust, or the fight to end segregation in the American South — is what you are doing, or not doing, right now." — Columnist Will Bunch on inaction in the face of America's great immigration crisis and the Trump administration's policies.

What we’re reading

Train enthusiasts Michael Brotzman of Haddonfield (left) and Harry Garforth of Philadelphia ride in the coveted front seats of PATCO's legacy cars Sunday.
AVI STEINHARDT
Train enthusiasts Michael Brotzman of Haddonfield (left) and Harry Garforth of Philadelphia ride in the coveted front seats of PATCO's legacy cars Sunday.

Your Daily Dose of | Legacy

On Sunday, enthusiasts climbed aboard a "legacy" PATCO train, with four cars from its original, 50-year-old fleet, one last time to say goodbye to its "railfan" seats and their panoramic views.