Good morning, Philadelphia. If you went to bed at a reasonable hour last night, there's quite a bit of international news to catch up on: President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un met in Singapore for an historic summit that Trump says is just the beginning of the pair's relationship. Reactions across the world stage continue to pour in, so expect many, many more updates on this story to come. In local news, the Central Bucks School District is adding a new safety measure to each of its schools next year in the form of war-zone trauma kits, meant to save bleeding victims in the event of a school shooting. Sadly, this is just the latest surreal effort by local schools to bring safety to their students at a scary time. This and much more continues below; let's jump in.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

Christopher Flanagan, chief of Narberth Ambulance Company, designed trauma bags for LMSD and other schools and provided training for staff on how to use the items inside like tourniquets, medicated gauze, and other emergency supplies needed to stop external bleeding in the event of an emergency. (Emily Cohen/for The Inquirer)
Emily Cohen/for The Inquirer
Christopher Flanagan, chief of Narberth Ambulance Company, designed trauma bags for LMSD and other schools and provided training for staff on how to use the items inside like tourniquets, medicated gauze, and other emergency supplies needed to stop external bleeding in the event of an emergency. (Emily Cohen/for The Inquirer)

This fall, each school in the Central Bucks district will have a large duffel bag on hand containing a medical kit with emergency supplies you'd find on Afghanistan battlefields. This way, if another school shooting erupts, teachers may be able to keep students from bleeding to death.

It's an unfortunate new reality as schools across the region focus on safety post-Parkland — and safety now means keeping child gunshot victims alive.

Just last week, a Chadds Ford school made headlines for the graduation gifts its eighth graders would receive: bullet-proof backpack shields. Meanwhile, school shootings have spurred a handful of Pennsylvania safety bills, but no action just yet.

While you were sleeping, President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un met one-on-one for nearly an hour, alone except for translators, in Singapore Tuesday. The historic summit also included five hours of talks with advisers and a handshake which was called "disconcerting" and "stunning and chilling" across the media as experts criticized Trump's willingness to give Kim's regime the appearance of meeting as equals.

Trump later said Kim agreed to the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and that the U.S. will end its military exercises with South Korea, long considered a security threat by North Korea. The pair also signed a document that amounted to an agreement to continue discussions and that North Korea will "work toward" denuclearization. Trump said this is just the beginning of their talks and he expects to meet with Kim "many times" in the future.

A jury of eight men and four women was selected Monday in the trial of Jucontee Thomas Woewiyu, 72. The Delaware County man was once the spokesman and defense minister for Charles Taylor, whose regime brought two bloody civil wars to Liberia.

But the case against Woewiyu is over immigration fraud, just like Mohammed "Jungle Jabbah" Jabateh, of East Lansdowne. Jabateh, who was connected to atrocities during Liberia's first civil war, was sent to prison earlier this year.

Before becoming an outspoken pillar of Philly's sizable Liberian community, Woewiyu allegedly played an integral part in stoking ethnic tensions that led to unspeakable violence.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

Philly's Pride parade was as colorful as ever this year and you can almost hear the music in @shaynemalcolm's photo.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we'll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out!

That’s Interesting

Opinions

June 12, 2018
Signe Wilkinson
June 12, 2018
"In the end, we may have lost some members and we may have sacrificed revenue, but at no time did we consider cancelling the program. We held fast in our commitment to create a day that children and families would experience with joy and openness." — Patricia D. Wellenbach, president and CEO of Please Touch Museum, on the Drag Queen Storytime that sparked a recent backlash.

What we’re reading

Jeremy Savo (from left), Ethan Feinstein, and Robyn Mello are ready for "Beardfest," South Jersey's homegrown version of Burning Man at Gradwell House Recording in Haddon Heights, Thursday, June 7, 2018.
DAVID SWANSON / Staff Photographer
Jeremy Savo (from left), Ethan Feinstein, and Robyn Mello are ready for "Beardfest," South Jersey's homegrown version of Burning Man at Gradwell House Recording in Haddon Heights, Thursday, June 7, 2018.

Your Daily Dose of | Beards

Beardfest is South Jersey's answer to Burning Man and Bonaroo, but with fewer celebrities and excesses. And it has almost nothing to do with beards.