Good morning, Philadelphia. Controversy surrounding the arrests of two black men at a Center City Starbucks continued Sunday as fraternity brothers of one of the men arrested rallied at the cafe. More than 100 members and supporters joined in with representatives from 30 different chapters invited to attend. Across town, on Temple's campus, another fraternity was in the spotlight, but for a much different reason: it was suspended over sexual assault allegations. The investigation is ongoing. Finally, in their first interviews since the killings, the families of two teens slain in a shooting that rocked South Philly last year have come forward to speak about harassment and grief they've experienced. Let's jump in.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

Bucketo Mitchell and Reese Tillman (right), members of the Omega Psi Phi fraternity at a rally April 22, 2018 outside the Starbucks where one of their fraternity brothers was arrested this month.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
Bucketo Mitchell and Reese Tillman (right), members of the Omega Psi Phi fraternity at a rally April 22, 2018 outside the Starbucks where one of their fraternity brothers was arrested this month.

Though it perhaps would not surprise the two black men arrested at a Center City Starbucks earlier this month, an analysis of police data shows that in Center City, black people are significantly more likely to be stopped than white people.

Outdoors, black people accounted for 50 percent of the stops last year, while whites made up about 37 percent. When inside, however, the numbers change considerably: 69 percent of those stopped were black and only 19 percent were white.

Yesterday, fraternity brothers of one of the men arrested, Rashon Nelson, traveled from up and down the East Coast to rally at the Center City Starbucks. The gathering began with the cry, "My skin color is not a crime."

Since the two teenaged boys were killed in South Philly six months ago, the families of Salvatore DiNubile and Caleer Miller have faced waves of grief. But they've also faced taunting and harassment, and now they're speaking out.

In the days after the 16-year-olds were shot dead, another teen, Brandon Olivieri, was charged in the killing, tensions rose in the neighborhood, and the Olivieri home was sprayed with bullets.

Emotions have spilled onto social media, where relatives of DiNubile said they've seen inflammatory posts. The digital drama recently continued offline, the family says, when DiNubile's father, who awaits trial on charges that he threatened a friend of the alleged shooter, received a threatening phone call.

One of Temple University's fraternities, Alpha Epsilon Pi, has been suspended as Philadelphia and campus police investigate two sexual assaults during parties at the fraternity's house.

A Temple police bulletin released Friday said they had received "multiple credible reports" of alleged crimes at Alpha Epsilon Pi's house, including sexual assault, underage drinking, and possible drug use. Two of the alleged victims are 19-year-old Temple students, and a third alleged victim has come forward.

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April 22, 2018
Signe Wilkinson
April 22, 2018
"Clemency is in the Constitution for a reason, and it is not simply to favor those close to the president. It would be a good time to return to the original, broader purpose."
— Law professor Mark Osler on

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Bryon Murphy and her dog, Olympia, train with New Leash on Life, a Philadelphia nonprofit that teaches inmates dog-training and grooming skills so they can find work once they leave prison.
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Bryon Murphy and her dog, Olympia, train with New Leash on Life, a Philadelphia nonprofit that teaches inmates dog-training and grooming skills so they can find work once they leave prison.

Your Daily Dose of | Puppy Love

Nonprofit New Leash on Life is a win-win for shelter dogs and prison inmates. The dogs are trained for adoption while the women train for jobs at animal shelters and groomers.