Welcome to Wednesday. Today the U.S. and South Korea are on edge following a powerful missile test in North Korea, and the U.S. braces for a potential tax overhaul, too.

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— Aubrey Nagle

Brady is shown here waiting for the start of a Nov. 21 news conference at City Hall in Philadelphia.
( DAVID MAIALETTI / Staff Photographer )
Brady is shown here waiting for the start of a Nov. 21 news conference at City Hall in Philadelphia.

For U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, who has been accused of illegally paying a 2012 primary competitor to drop out, a federal indictment was a potentially looming. But, it turns out, on Sunday Justice Department lawyers let the statute of limitations expire on many of the charges he could have faced.

Brady isn't in the clear yet; officials won't say whether this means the end of the investigation. But his legal team is cautiously optimistic.

Plus, Brady could still be charged with lying to the FBI or filing a false campaign report, among other purported crimes. These are still within their statute of limitation.

Last night, a Senate panel approved the GOP effort to rewrite the tax code, sending it to the full Senate for a vote. Now several Republicans who had wavered over their support are considering backing the bill.

But it's not a done deal: a handful are still uncommitted, and Republicans only control the senate by a  52-48 lead.

A meeting between Trump and congressional leaders to avoid a government shutdown derailed yesterday as Trump tweeted attacks on top Democrats. Congress's deadline to keep federal agencies open is a week from Friday.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court heard arguments yesterday in a First Amendment case over a rap song that included the lyrics "Let's kill these cops, cause they don't do us no good" and references to two Pittsburgh police officers.

The rapper, Jamal Knox, 23, looks to overturn his conviction for terroristic threats and witness intimidation. The question at hand: was the song protected under his right to free speech or does it constitute a criminal threat?

Depending on the court's decision, the case could rise to the U.S. Supreme Court.

What you need to know today

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That’s Interesting

Opinions

November 29, 2017
Signe Wilkinson
November 29, 2017
"What every CEO knows but won't tell you is this: A tax break for their company simply means a fatter bottom line. Not jobs. Not investment. Just more money in the pockets of the folks like me." — La Colombe founder Todd Carmichael supports Sen. Bob Casey's effort to push against tax breaks for corporations.

What we’re reading

Your Daily Dose of | Doppelgängers

The internet can’t stop pointing out that Prince Harry and Eagles QB Carson Wentz look alike. What do you think?