Good morning, neighbors. It looks like the heat that crept in over your hopefully relaxing weekend is here to stay, at least for a while. New Jersey is feeling the heat, too; according to new data, temperatures in the Garden State are rising faster than most of the U.S. Our report on the news explains how climate change is contributing to major changes along the Jersey Shore, and it's scary stuff. In other Jersey news, a shooting at a Trenton arts festival shocked residents over the weekend. Details are still unfolding, but the chaotic scene early Sunday morning looked to be the result of a turf war, according to officials. Let's dig in and get the week started.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

Flooding after high tide on Friday, March 3, 2018 at 30th Street and West Avenue in Ocean City.
Frank Kummer / Staff
Flooding after high tide on Friday, March 3, 2018 at 30th Street and West Avenue in Ocean City.

Enjoying sun at the Jersey Shore this summer? The heat may be great for swimming, but new data bolstering years of science on climate change shows homes at the Shore and beyond are at risk of chronic flooding thanks to rising temperatures.

In fact, New Jersey's average temperature has risen more than 2 degrees in the past 30 years. That may not sound like much, but that's faster than most of the rest of the nation.

Rising seas and temperatures bring a myriad of problems with them, too, like killing plants further inland and welcoming invasive species that love the warmth.

Shots rang out as at least two men started firing at 2:45 a.m. Sunday at the Art All Night festival in Trenton, leaving one person dead a suspected gunman, shot dead by police  and 22 injured, including a 13-year-old boy.

Two men who were among the 17 wounded by gunfire are in custody. Several victims are in critical condition. Officials said Sunday the shoot-out appeared to be the result of a "neighborhood beef" and a Facebook post warned of the violence Saturday.

One man who filmed the aftermath of the shooting described the scene as chaotic and worried the shooting wouldn't receive its due attention. "[Black communities] don't have mass shootings in schools. They have them at clubs and gatherings," he said.

The myth that low-income Americans regularly use food stamps (now the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) to buy steaks and lobsters is just that: a myth.

Studies show SNAP users actually shop just like the rest of us and we all make bad food choices. But that data hasn't stopped politicians from trying to restrict what low-income people can purchase, or neighbors and cashiers from judging their grocery carts.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

It was a great weekend for museum visits, as @philly_music_dad knows.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we'll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out!

That’s Interesting

Opinions

June 18, 2018
Signe Wilkinson
June 18, 2018
"Young people need spaces to grow and activities for enrichment; the goal should be to keep youths occupied and engaged, not take away their civil rights." — Lelabari Giwa, intern in the Youth Justice Project at Community Legal Services, on why a curfew for minors along South Street criminalizes normal youth behavior.

What we’re reading

Tamir Harper, onstage with former First Lady Michelle Obama at National College Signing Day.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Tamir Harper, onstage with former First Lady Michelle Obama at National College Signing Day.

Your Daily Dose of | Ambition

Education consultant, speaker, and nonprofit co-founder Tamir Harper has a busy summer planned working with State Rep. Joanna McClinton. But then he's headed back to school himself, because he's just 18 years old.