I HAVE READ with interest the coverage of your state Supreme Court, as I have long had concerns regarding the behavior of judicial officials, especially at such a high level.

I will not comment on the pending conduct investigation of Justice McCaffery, as it would be more fair to allow for whatever minimum potential for due process that remains (probably none) to be reserved, and because I am acquainted with his wife and have met the Justice on a couple of occasions, although I have not seen or spoken to either of them in many years.

I also read the coverage of the actions of your Chief Justice. I take all reporting about the behavior of public officials with some skepticism, but there is no reason to be skeptical about the "concurring opinion" to Justice McCaffery's temporary suspension order which bears the Chief Justice's name. If ever there was an intemperate, inappropriate, self-serving, prejudicial, prejudgment in connection with a sensitive pending proceeding, I have never in my 39 years as a practicing attorney in two states (15 of which were spent serving as a local judge) seen another one that compares.

The Chief Justice's public comments and injection of his analysis into his "concurring opinion" in this manner is nothing short of amazing considering his position, and he should be disqualified, as a matter of judicial ethics, from any further judicial service whatsoever, regardless of the result of the inquiry into Justice McCaffery, and regardless of whether or not there is any validity to his comments.

Steven J. Messinger

Chief Assistant District Attorney

Paulding Judicial Circuit (Georgia)

Judicial bull

It seems that every time there is anything remotely akin to a judicial scandal, the proponents of so-called "merit selection of judges" come out of the woodwork with their plan to purportedly restore dignity and civility to our courts.

Bull.

The myth of "merit selection" is political code for, "We think the voters are too stupid to elect judges." Rather than allowing all of us to cast our vote for the candidate we select, "merit selection" seeks to place the selection of our judges in the hands of a few well-connected political insiders. If the voters are intelligent enough to select candidates for every office from Division Committeeman to Congressman to President of the United States, how is it that we are somehow unqualified to select the best candidates for the crucially important office of judge?

The assertion is absurd. In our republic there are few elected offices as important as judge, and there can be no more qualified selection committee than the citizens as a body. Judges should not be selected in some smoke-filled back room, they should be elected by we the people. Any scheme to take the power of the entire electorate and place it solely in the hands of a governor and a handful of his or her cronies is a direct effort at exerting undue influence over our judiciary, and therefore our Commonwealth.

Don't buy the hype. Let the people vote.

Tom McCourt

Philadelphia

Tricky Dick, Trickier Will

I just watched an HBO special on Richard Nixon and the saga that ensued surrounding his presidency and it gave me a newfound respect and admiration for a great president.

Which brings me to Will Bunch, because he always seems to write negative articles about the man, pretending it's still 1972 and that anything he writes about is interesting or controversial. I bet Will Bunch lets homeless people sleep in his basement to ease his white guilt, or pretend like they are still Occupying something.

It's gotta be just a hoot in the Bunch household when he and his guests use the eco-friendly toilet paper (the kind with recycled wood-chips in it) and it tears up their backsides, which leads to his warped liberal mentality, philosophies. It must feel like wiping with a newspaper, and if one was to every find oneself in such an unfortunate situation, the best page to start the rigorous process with would be the page with an article that you refer to as "Attytood."

In the words of one of your liberal heroes, Edward R. Murrow, "Good night and good luck, Will."

Jason Farrell

Philadelphia

Teachers: Play nice

These teachers have been getting perks long enough. That has to stop. Pay for your health care like everyone else. Taxpayers have been getting ripped off long enough. Who do these so-called teachers think they are? Play like everybody else or look for another job.

Pat Panichelli

Philadelphia

Ebola's not the fear

Gov. Corbett and Mayor Nutter are reassuring Pennsylvanians and Philadelphians about the Ebola outbreak.

Regarding these two gentlemen, I don't believe that is what these groups of people are afraid of.

Mayer Krain

Philadelphia