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Andy Reid gives thumbs-up to Eagles front office shake-up

INDIANAPOLIS - Ed Marynowitz's first seven months working for the Eagles overlapped with Andy Reid's final season in Philadelphia, giving Reid enough exposure to the team's new vice president of player personnel that the longtime coach praised Chip Kelly's decision to promote him.

Kansas City Chiefs coach Andy Reid speaks to the media during the 2015 NFL Combine at Lucas Oil Stadium. (Brian Spurlock/USA TODAY Sports)
Kansas City Chiefs coach Andy Reid speaks to the media during the 2015 NFL Combine at Lucas Oil Stadium. (Brian Spurlock/USA TODAY Sports)Read more

INDIANAPOLIS - Ed Marynowitz's first seven months working for the Eagles overlapped with Andy Reid's final season in Philadelphia, giving Reid enough exposure to the team's new vice president of player personnel that the longtime coach praised Chip Kelly's decision to promote him.

"Ed's on the rise, boy," Reid said Wednesday at the NFL's annual scouting combine. "He's a good one. I think it was a great choice by Chip."

In May 2012, the Eagles made seven front office transactions. Most of the moves were minor, the types of hires that wouldn't resonate with the fans. One was the decision to hire Marynowitz away from Alabama as assistant director of pro scouting, and Marynowitz has had a rapid two-year rise through the front office.

After the Eagles' front office shake-up that left Kelly with final say of football decisions - just like Reid had - and pushed aside Howie Roseman, Marynowitz was promoted to vice president of player personnel at age 30.

"Just a sharp guy," said Reid, who is now head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs. "Good evaluator. He'd tell you a good player from a bad player. Stays one step ahead of it. Could look into the future on things. I think he's going to do a great job there."

Reid was not responsible for Marynowitz's hire. Roseman's relationship with Marynowitz led the Eagles to pluck him away from Alabama, where he was a top aide to Crimson Tide coach Nick Saban.

But Reid was in charge of all football operations, so he was keenly aware of the scouting staff. He thought Marynowitz presented "all the intangibles" to thrive.

"Remember, at Alabama they had full trust in him," Reid said. "Nick didn't want to lose him."

Reid, who is walking with a cane after recent knee replacement surgery, remained diplomatic about the Eagles' end-of-season turbulence. He said he has coached long enough that "nothing surprises" him.

"Listen, I'm a big Howie fan, I'm a big Chip fan," Reid said. "It looks like everybody's happy, which is important, and in good positions. Nobody was released. That's a positive. And whatever they've done, they feel they've done what's best for the Eagles."

The "everybody's happy" sentiment might be overstated. Roseman no longer has his dream job of picking players, although he was rewarded with a contract extension and a raise.

No one on the Eagles' coaching staff or in the front office has spoken publicly since the changes were made, including Kelly, Roseman, Marynowitz, and team owner Jeffrey Lurie. The silence extends to this week's combine, where the Eagles are one of three teams that will not have a representative addressing reporters.

One question about the new arrangement is whether Marynowitz can provide a dissenting voice to Kelly, who has all the power after two seasons. Reid did not anticipate a problem.

"This isn't warfare," Reid said. "You work together. Chip's great at that and Ed's great at that, so I don't think that'll be a problem. They'll communicate. It's not going to be a boxing match."

Reid does not have personnel control in Kansas City the way he did in Philadelphia. He works with general manager John Dorsey, who has the control. Reid welcomed the change because he wanted to focus entirely on coaching after running the front office in Philadelphia - the same authority that Kelly has been given.

"I've been there, done that with the other part of it," Reid said. "I enjoyed it for that period of time. It was great to have a change, great to be back in the coaching part of it, which I desired with this move - to get back in and coach offensive football."

Reid said the key in the decision-making process is communication, honesty, and trust - with "egos checked at the door." That will be important in the Eagles' new front office structure.

"If it works for them, that's all I care about," Reid said. "That's the most important thing."

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