Jo-Jo's long nightmare is over

Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Jo-Jo Reyes nearly missed making baseball history on Monday. He failed to get in the record book by one game - but he's happy about it.

Reyes avoided becoming the first pitcher to go winless in 29 starts when he and the Jays pummeled the Indians, 11-2. Last Wednesday, Reyes had joined Oakland's Matt Keough, who went 28 starts between wins in 1978 and 1979, matching the dubious mark first set by Boston's Cliff Curtis in 1910 and 1911.

The Jays gave Reyes a boatload of run support, and manager John Farrell let Reyes keep the record in his sights by allowing him to throw a 121-pitch complete game.

The home crowd stood and cheered "Jo-Jo, Jo-Jo" as Cleveland's Jack Hannahan batted with two outs in the ninth. Catcher J.P. Arencibia embraced Reyes after Hannahan struck out, and the rest of Toronto's pitchers streamed to the mound in celebration. One fan held up a sign reading "I believe in Jo-Jo."

Making a case for Figgins

Patrons at Norm's Eatery and Ale House in Seattle might be rooting for the Mariners, but against third baseman Chone Figgins. That's because Figgins' batting average helps determine the price of beer.

Every Monday night, Norm's hosts "Gettin' Figgy With It," in which the price of a pint of draft is based on Figgins' floundering batting average. Tuesday, Figgins was hitting .190.

Norm's has been known for its promotions based on the Mariners' struggles. Last season, they had a food-and-drink special called "Milton's Meltdowns," based on Milton Bradley's adventures on and off the field.

Another Royals wedding soon?

Monday was Memorial Day, and many baseball teams supported the holiday by wearing tribute caps. Several also had service members participate by throwing out the first pitch or singing "God Bless America." In Kansas City, a soldier who hadn't been home in over a year recorded a video proposal that aired on the jumbotron while his intended watched from the top of the Royals' dugout. When the video ended, he surprised her by jumping up from behind the dugout. She sprinted to him, leaped into his arms, and accepted.

Contact staff writer Steve Elliott at elliott@phillynews.com.
This article contains information from the Associated Press.