11:35 PM - January 12, 2021
11:35 PM - January 12, 2021

House approves resolution asking Pence to invoke 25th Amendment; Vice President says he won’t

The U.S. House late Tuesday night passed a resolution asking Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and remove President Donald Trump from office because of the events leading up to and including the attempted Capitol insurrection last week, and Pence declined.

The final vote was 223-205 shortly before 11:30 p.m. One Republican voted with the Democrats. Five Republicans were recorded as not voting.

The House is now scheduled to consider impeachment of Trump on Wednesday.

During an early portion of debate on the 25th Amendment resolution, U.S. Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon of Delaware County led the Democratic side and said the mob that stormed the Capitol did so “with the most evil and destructive intent,” and at the incitment of Trump.

Scanlon said that the participants declared that they wanted to hang Vice President Mike Pence and kidnap House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and “they brought the tools to do it.”

Scanlon recalled how the president and his administration repeatedly told his supporters for months that if he didn’t win, then the election was rigged, and that Trump “whipped them into a frenzy.”

Trump is a “clear and present danger” if he remains in office, Scalon said.

Republicans who opposed the resolution instead recommended the creation of a bi-partisan commission to investigate the causes of the events of Jan. 6. They said the resolution was pointless and simply a partisan stunt because Pence said he would not act to remove Trump.

Rep. Jim Jordan, a Republican from Ohio who has been one of Trump’s most vocal supporters, and who Trump announced on Monday will be the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, decried the resolution and other Democrat-led actions and called them part of the “cancel-culture mob.”

Pence, in a letter to Pelosi explaining that he would not invoke the 25th Amendment, quoted the Bible and said “now is the time to heal.”

— Robert Moran

9:11 PM - January 12, 2021
9:11 PM - January 12, 2021

Montco U.S. House Rep. Dean takes front-line role for impeachment

U.S. Rep. Madeleine Dean will be playing a front-line role in the impeachment of President Trump.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi named Dean, a Montgomery County Democrat, one of nine impeachment managers Tuesday night. If the House votes to impeach Trump Wednesday — as appears almost certain — the impeachment managers will present the case at a Senate trial.

“They will do so guided by their great love of country, determination to protect our democracy and loyalty to our oath to the Constitution,” Pelosi said in a statement.

“I am honored to serve as an impeachment manager among my esteemed colleagues — it is for the sake of our country, not hate of one man or anyone, but for the love of our country and constitution,” Dean said. “Never would I have thought that I would be sitting on the House floor when domestic terrorists surrounded the chambers -- motivated and infected by dangerous lies — seeking to assassinate a Speaker, hang a Vice President, and hunt down members of Congress, staff, and reporters. The case is clear: it is our solemn duty to impeach Donald J. Trump. This tragedy must have consequences.”

— Jonathan Tamari

8:40 PM - January 12, 2021
8:40 PM - January 12, 2021

Pence rules out invoking 25th Amendment to remove Trump

Vice President Mike Pence is ruling out invoking the 25th Amendment to remove President Donald Trump from power, less than a week after the president fomented the violent insurrection at the Capitol.

In a letter late Tuesday to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Pence said the mechanism should not be used “as a means of punishment or usurpation” and reserved for cases of medical or mental incapacitation.

Pelosi has called on Pence to secure the majority of the Cabinet and vote to declare Trump unfit to serve.

As the House appears on the cusp of a bipartisan impeachment of Trump, Pence encouraged Congress to avoid actions to “further divide and inflame the passions of the moment” and to focus on smoothing the transition to President-elect Joe Biden’s administration.

Pelosi has said if Pence rejects use of the 25th Amendment, the House will move to impeach him. Already, at least three Republicans have said they would vote for that.

— Associated Press

8:04 PM - January 12, 2021
8:04 PM - January 12, 2021

Republican U.S. House member from Bucks County introduces resolution to censure Trump as alternative to impeachment

Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick has introduced a resolution to censure President Donald Trump rather than impeach him, arguing that impeachment would be too divisive and time consuming.

“President Trump’s attempts to undermine the outcome of the 2020 election have been unconscionable. The combination of a false information campaign coupled with inflammatory rhetoric led to the devastation that I was a personal witness to on the House Floor on January 6th,” Fitzpatrick, of Bucks County, said in a statement Tuesday afternoon, a day ahead of a planned impeachment vote in the House.

“His actions threatened the integrity of our democracy, Congress, and his own Vice President,” Fitzpatrick added. “President Trump’s actions, behavior, and language are unacceptable and unbecoming of the office he holds for the next eight days.”

Fitzpatrick, the only Pennsylvania Republican in the House who voted against blocking the state’s electoral votes last week, was joined by five other Republicans in seeking a censure. They argued that impeachment was doomed to fail in the Senate, where it requires 67 votes, meaning at least 17 Senate Republicans would have to support it. They added that it would consume an important window at the start of Joe Biden’s presidency.

There are signs, however, of growing GOP support for impeachment. Hours before Fitzpatrick released his proposal the New York Times reported that the Senate’s top Republican, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, had told associates that he believes Trump has committed impeachable offenses. And Rep. Liz Cheney (R., Wyo.), the third-ranking Republican in the House, put out a forceful statement supporting impeachment.

Those moves could give more Republicans cover to support impeachment, though some others are aiming for a less drastic step, like censure.

— Jonathan Tamari

5:57 PM - January 12, 2021
5:57 PM - January 12, 2021

U.S. House Rep. Liz Cheney says she will vote to impeach Trump

In file photo from 2019, Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and other Republicans attend a news conference after the House's vote to advance impeachment proceedings.
Matt McClain
In file photo from 2019, Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and other Republicans attend a news conference after the House's vote to advance impeachment proceedings.

Republican Rep. Liz Cheney says she will vote to impeach President Donald Trump.

The Wyoming congresswoman, the No. 3 Republican in the House, said in a statement Tuesday that Trump “summoned” the mob that attacked the Capitol last week, “assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack.”

She says, “Everything that followed was his doing.”

She also notes that Trump could have immediately intervened to stop his supporters, but he did not.

Cheney says, “There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.”

Cheney is a daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney.

Trump himself has taken no responsibility for his role in inciting the attackers.

New York Rep. John Katko was the first Republican to say he’d vote to impeach Trump.

— Associated Press

5:21 PM - January 12, 2021
5:21 PM - January 12, 2021

Seven SEPTA police officers investigated after attending Wednesday Trump rally

Seven SEPTA Transit officers are being investigated by the transportation authority for attending President Donald Trump’s Wednesday rally that grew into a violent insurrection on the U.S. Capitol that resulted in five fatalities, SEPTA spokesperson Andrew Busch confirmed Tuesday.

SEPTA received a tip on Thursday that an officer had attended the rally, prompting SEPTA police internal affairs to launch an investigation and found an additional six others were present at the event.

The investigation into whether the officers participated in illegal activity is ongoing Busch said. He did not share ranks or names of the officers.

The investigation was first reported by WHYY.

— Patricia Madej

4:28 PM - January 12, 2021
4:28 PM - January 12, 2021

Security stepped up at Pennsylvania Capitol Complex

Amid reports of expected armed demonstrations or attacks at state capitols across the country, police in tactical gear are patrolling the Capitol Complex in Harrisburg as “a show of the capabilities of the Capitol Police force,” a spokesperson said Tuesday.

Troy Thompson, a spokesperson for the General Services Department that oversees Capitol Police, said officers with the department’s “Special Response Team” began patrolling the complex Monday, days after armed insurrectionists stormed the U.S. Capitol. He said that protocol will remain in place “as long as it’s needed.”

Law enforcement officials have not publicized specific threats of violence in Harrisburg, but the FBI on Monday put out a rare bulletin warning of planned armed demonstrations at every state capitol both this Sunday and on Jan. 20, the day President-elect Joe Biden will be inaugurated.

Capitol Police are working with local, state, and federal agencies. Pennsylvania State Police are also monitoring the situation at the Capitol and collaborating with the Pennsylvania Emergency Management agency, spokesperson Ryan Tarkowski said.

He added that the Pennsylvania Criminal Intelligence Center is based in Harrisburg and staffed by analysts who provide law enforcement with intelligence, and that the agency is “confident” it has the resources “to protect Pennsylvanians against threats.”

Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro said his office is closely coordinating with the state and Capitol police “to ensure the safety of our Capitol and commonwealth facilities. As law enforcement, we must be aware, be prepared, collaborate and share resources, including intel.”

— Anna Orso

4:20 PM - January 12, 2021
4:20 PM - January 12, 2021

Arrests so far in fed investigation of Capitol attack ‘tip of the iceberg,’ lead prosecutor says

Pro-Trump insurrectionsits attempt to force their way through a police barricade in front of the U.S. Capital on Jan. 6.
Kent Nishimura / MCT
Pro-Trump insurrectionsits attempt to force their way through a police barricade in front of the U.S. Capital on Jan. 6.

Calling it “the tip of the iceberg,” Acting U.S. Attorney Michael R. Sherwin on Tuesday said more than 170 case files have been opened in the federal criminal investigation of the attack on the Capitol last week, and that some participants likely will face conspiracy and sedition charges.

Sherwin, based in the District of Columbia, said more than 70 people have been charged so far and that number is expected to increase “into the hundreds,” with offenses ranging from simple trespass and mail theft, to the theft of national security information and felony murder, he said.

“People will be shocked by some of the egregious conduct that occurred within the Capitol,” he said at the Department of Justice’s first formal news briefing on the attack.

The “scope and scale” of the investigation is unprecedented in the history of the Justice Department and FBI, Sherwin said.

His office has assembled a task force to specifically look at sedition and conspiracy charges, he said, which carry a prison sentence of up to 20 years. Another team is specifically investigating groups that targeted members of the media. “You will be charged and you will be found,” he said.

FBI Assistant Director in Charge Steven M. D’Antuono said the agency has received more than 100,000 pieces of digital media tips from the public helping identify those involved with the Capitol attack. The FBI is offering a $50,000 reward for helping identify the individuals involved with planting two pipe bombs outside Washington, D.C., RNC and DNC offices.

The bombs, Sherwin said, were real, explosive devices with timers and igniters. “We don’t know exactly why they didn’t go off,” he said.

— Ellie Rushing

2:40 PM - January 12, 2021
2:40 PM - January 12, 2021

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo cancels his last trip abroad

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021.
Andrew Harnik / AP
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has canceled what would have been his final official trip abroad as concerns grow over potential violence at next week’s presidential inauguration, the State Department said Tuesday.

Less than 18 hours after announcing that Pompeo would be traveling to Brussels this week to close out his tenure as America’s top diplomat, the department said it had pulled down all senior-level overseas travel, including the secretary’s. Pompeo was to have met with NATO chief Jens Stoltenberg and Belgium’s foreign minister while in Brussels. Initial plans for a stop in Luxembourg had been already been scrapped due to the coronavirus pandemic, officials said.

Spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus said the decision had been made to assist in the transition to the incoming Biden administration, which will assume office on Jan. 20. Since last week’s deadly assault on the U.S. Capitol by rioters encouraged by President Donald Trump, concerns have been raised about the security of Biden’s inauguration. Officials said the cancellation of Pompeo’s trip was intended to support the transition and was not related to fears of violence.

“The Department of State is well along in its transition efforts with President-elect Biden’s team,” Ortagus said in a statement. “We are fully committed to the completion of a smooth and orderly transition process to be finalized over the next 8 days. Both the department and the President-elect’s team have been fully engaged for several weeks toward this end, and we are pleased with the level of cooperation and professionalism that has been displayed.”

— Associated Press

2:29 PM - January 12, 2021
2:29 PM - January 12, 2021

No specific threats against Pennsylvania or Philadelphia, officials say

City spokesperson Lauren Cox said there are no known specific threats against Philadelphia, but police have been monitoring for “any developments relevant to Philadelphia” since the insurrection at the Capitol last week.

The police department “is prepared to activate with additional personnel to secure and patrol strategic locations throughout the city in the coming days if needed,” Cox said. “The safety and well-being of Philadelphians is our top priority, and we will continue to monitor the situation.”

Gov. Tom Wolf said at a coronavirus briefing Tuesday that he has not heard any specific information that armed groups are coming to the capital or that any threats have been made. “We’re ready for anything that might happen, but we have not heard anything specifically,” he said.

— Laura McCrystal and Justine McDaniel

1:50 PM - January 12, 2021
1:50 PM - January 12, 2021

15,000 National Guard members will deploy to Washington, D.C.

A total of 15,000 National Guard members have now been activated and will deploy to Washington, D.C., to help provide security in the run up to the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden.

The number of Guard members coming in from other states has been growing, amid escalating fears of more violent protests in the wake of the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol last week.

Army Gen. Daniel Hokanson, chief of the National Guard Bureau, was given the authority to tap up to 15,000 Guard, but he has said that requests for assistance from the Secret Service, the U.S. Park Police and the Capitol Police have been increasing this week.

The Army also said Tuesday that officials are working with the Secret Service to determine which Guard members may need additional background screening. Rep. Jason Crow (D., Co.), had asked Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy to have the Army’s Criminal Investigation Command screen Guard members coming in to ensure they were not “sympathetic to domestic terrorists.”

The Army said CID will not be reviewing all the Guard, but some members may be subject to additional background screening. Traditionally, those who get within close proximity to the president — or in this case the president-elect — are checked more closely.

So far, officials said they have not yet identified any Guard members who participated in the protests, but investigations are ongoing.

In a statement, the Army said the D.C. National Guard is also giving troops additional training as they arrive in the city, so they know to identify and report any extremist behavior to their commanders.

The Army also said it is working with the FBI to identify people who participated in Capitol attack, adding, “any type of activity that involves violence, civil disobedience, or a breach of peace may be punishable under the Uniform Code of Military Justice or under state or federal law.”

— Associated Press

12:40 PM - January 12, 2021
12:40 PM - January 12, 2021

FBI report warned of ‘war’ at the Capitol a day before the riot

Pro Trump rioters struggle to take control of a door that is guarded by police at the Capitol building on Jan. .
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Pro Trump rioters struggle to take control of a door that is guarded by police at the Capitol building on Jan. .

A day before rioters stormed Congress, an FBI office in Virginia issued an explicit internal warning that extremists were preparing to travel to Washington to commit violence and “war,” according to an internal document reviewed by The Washington Post that contradicts a senior official’s declaration that the bureau had no intelligence indicating that anyone at last week’s pro-Trump protest planned to do harm.

A situational information report approved for release the day before the U.S. Capitol riot painted a dire portrait of dangerous plans, including individuals sharing a map of the complex’s tunnels, and possible rally points for would-be conspirators to meet up in Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and South Carolina and head in groups to Washington.

“As of 5 January 2021, FBI Norfolk received information indicating calls for violence in response to ‘unlawful lockdowns’ to begin on 6 January 2021 in Washington. D.C.,” the document says. “An online thread discussed specific calls for violence to include stating ‘Be ready to fight. Congress needs to hear glass breaking, doors being kicked in, and blood... being spilled. Get violent. Stop calling this a march, or rally, or a protest. Go there ready for war. We get our President or we die. NOTHING else will achieve this goal.”

The warning is the most stark evidence yet of the sizable intelligence failure that preceded the mayhem, during which five people died.

On Friday, the head of the FBI’s Washington Field Office, Steven D’Antuono, told reporters that “there was no indication” of anything planned for the day of Trump’s rally “other than First Amendment-protected activity.” D’Antuono added, “we worked diligently with our partners on this.”

— Washington Post

12:08 PM - January 12, 2021
12:08 PM - January 12, 2021

Federal judge rules in favor of Democratic Pa. Senate candidate Republicans refused to seat

Pennsylvania state Sen. James Brewster, who won reelection in the 2020 election but has yet to be seated by the Republican majority.
James Robinson / Pennsylvania Senate Democratic Caucus
Pennsylvania state Sen. James Brewster, who won reelection in the 2020 election but has yet to be seated by the Republican majority.

A federal judge has upheld the validity of hundreds of undated mail ballots cast in Allegheny County, ruling in favor of the Democratic candidate in a close state Senate race.

Republican Nicole Ziccarelli filed the suit seeking to throw out 2,349 mail ballots that Allegheny County election officials counted even though they did not have a handwritten date on the outer envelope. Just over 300 of those votes were cast in Ziccarelli’s race against incumbent Democrat Jim Brewster, giving him a 69 vote lead.

But in neighboring Westmoreland County, sections of which fall within the 45th senatorial district, election officials did not count ballots that were not dated by voters. That, Ziccarelli contended through her lawyer Matt Haverstick, violated her due process and equal protection rights.

She lost a similar case that went all the way to the state Supreme Court.

In December, Brewster’s victory was certified by the state. Still, Republicans in the Pennsylvania Senate refused to seat him last week during a chaotic session.

— Sarah Anne Hughes, Spotlight PA

11:30 AM - January 12, 2021
11:30 AM - January 12, 2021

Third House member tests positive after lockdown in room with some maskless Republicans

Rep. Brad Schneider (D-Ill.) is the third Democratic House member in 24 hours to reveal he has tested positive for the coronavirus after being among the dozens who went into lockdown together in a committee room where several Republicans refused to wear masks.

“Last Wednesday, after narrowly escaping a violent mob incited by the President of the United States to attack the Capitol and its occupants, I was forced to spend several hours in a secure but confined location with dozens of other Members of Congress,” Schneider said in a statement. “Several Republican lawmakers in the room adamantly refused to wear a mask … Today, I am now in strict isolation, worried that I have risked my wife’s health and angry at the selfishness and arrogance of the anti-maskers who put their own contempt and disregard for decency ahead of the health and safety of their colleagues and our staff.”

Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D, Wash.) and Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman (D., N.J.), a cancer survivor, have also tested positive after being held in the crowded room while a violent mob stormed the Capitol.

Several lawmakers are calling for the Republicans who refused to wear a mask, even when offered one by a Democratic colleague, to be fined and the House to take a more firm stance enforcing mask-wearing inside the Capitol.

— Washington Post

11:05 AM - January 12, 2021
11:05 AM - January 12, 2021

Trump rejects his role in inciting Capitol riot in first public remarks since storming

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., for a trip to Alamo, Texas, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP
President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., for a trip to Alamo, Texas, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021.

President Donald Trump rejected his own role in last week’s insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday, telling reporters his speech to supporters prior to the riot was “totally appropriate” and played no role in their violent actions.

Making his first public comments since the deadly assault at the Capitol last week, Trump attacked “big tech” companies like Facebook and Twitter for removing him from their platforms, but had little to say about the assault on the Capitol itself or the five people who lost their lives during the insurrection.

In his speech, Trump called on his supporters to march to the Capitol and “fight much harder” against lawmakers who planned to certify President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. After his speech, his supporters overran the Capitol in a violent insurrection that left five people dead, including a Capitol Police officer.

Trump also claimed that the push for his impeachment in Congress is causing “tremendous anger” in the country and complained it was “a continuation of the greatest witch hunt in the history of politics.” But he said he wants “no violence.”

Trump is traveling to Alamo, Texas, Tuesday to visit the U.S.-Mexico border. City officials in Alamo released a statement staying the administration had not reached out to them prior to his visit and had no details about his itinerary.

— Rob Tornoe

9:43 AM - January 12, 2021
9:43 AM - January 12, 2021

Pa. congressman says lawmakers were briefed on new, specific threats

Members of Congress were briefed Monday night on new threats facing lawmakers and the U.S. Capitol, Rep. Connor Lamb (D., Pa.) said on CNN Tuesday.

“The threats we are facing are very specific,” Lamb said during an interview on New Day. “They’re talking about 4,000 armed patriots to surround the Capitol and prevent any Democrat from going in, and they have published rules of engagement, meaning when you shoot and when you don’t.”

“This is an organized group that has a plan,” Lamb added. “We are not negotiating with or reasoning with these people. They have to be prosecuted. They have to be stopped. And unfortunately that includes the president, which is why he needs to be impeached and removed from office.”

When asked by CNN anchor Alisyn Camerota if these are specific, credible threats, Lamb simply responded, “Yes.”

The briefing comes after the FBI released a bulletin warning of plans for armed protests at all 50 state capitals and in Washington in the days leading up to President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration.

— Rob Tornoe

9:05 AM - January 12, 2021
9:05 AM - January 12, 2021

Trump cabinet member refuses to say if Trump is fit for office

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar waffled when asked directly if President Donald Trump was fit for office and should remain in charge following last week’s riot at the U.S. Capitol.

During an interview on ABC’s Good Morning America, Azar said Trump’s rhetoric ahead of the attack was “unacceptable” and called the insurrection an “assault on democracy,” but struggled when pressed repeatedly to say whether Trump is able to discharge the duties of his office.

“I’m not going to get into or discuss the 25th Amendment here,” Azar said, adding it “would not be appropriate for me to discuss my conversations with colleagues or with the president and vice president.”

The House of Representatives is expected to vote Tuesday on a resolution calling for Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office. The amendment can be invoked if Pence and a majority of the cabinet vote that the president “is unable to discharge the powers and duties” of the office.

The vote will be mostly ceremonial, as Pence is not expected to invoke the 25th Amendment. The House is expected to vote on impeaching Trump Wednesday.

— Rob Tornoe

9:05 AM - January 12, 2021
9:05 AM - January 12, 2021

Trump plans border wall visit in Texas, his first public event since last week’s violence

New sections of border barriers are being built in Hidalgo, Tx. Only a fraction of the construction has been new barriers.
Eric Gay / AP
New sections of border barriers are being built in Hidalgo, Tx. Only a fraction of the construction has been new barriers.

President Donald Trump is expected to emerge from seclusion Tuesday and travel to Alamo, Texas, where he plans to tour a section of border wall and deliver remarks on immigration, an issue the White House considers a significant part of his legacy.

The event will mark the first time Trump has appeared in public since last Wednesday’s violent takeover of the Capitol by a mob of his supporters. Aside from a video posted Thursday on Twitter, Trump has remained out of the public eye since the episode.

“President Trump is expected to travel to Alamo, Texas, on Tuesday to mark the completion of more than 400 miles of border wall — a promise made, promise kept — and his administration’s efforts to reform our broken immigration system,” deputy White House press secretary Judd Deere told reporters ahead of the visit.

The White House figure for border wall construction includes fencing that was erected to replace existing barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border. Only a fraction of the construction has been new barriers.

The construction of a border wall, paid for by Mexico, was a cornerstone of Trump’s campaign. U.S. taxpayers have footed the bill for the barriers that have been constructed during the past four years.

— Washington Post

7:45 AM - January 12, 2021
7:45 AM - January 12, 2021

Trump impeachment vote expected Wednesday on ‘incitement of insurrection’ charge

President Donald Trump gestures while speaking to the crowd at the Ellipse in Washington on Wednesday.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
President Donald Trump gestures while speaking to the crowd at the Ellipse in Washington on Wednesday.

Poised to impeach, the House sped ahead on Monday with plans to oust President Donald Trump from office, warning he is a threat to democracy and pushing the vice president and Cabinet to act even more quickly in an extraordinary effort to remove Trump in the final days of his presidency.

Trump faces a single charge — “incitement of insurrection” — after the deadly Capitol riot in an impeachment resolution that the House will begin debating Wednesday.

At the same time, the FBI warned ominously Monday of potential armed protests in Washington and many states by Trump loyalists ahead of President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration Jan. 20. In a dark foreshadowing, the Washington Monument was closed to the public amid the threats of disruption. Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf abruptly resigned.

It all added up to stunning final moments for Trump’s presidency as Democrats and a growing number of Republicans declare he is unfit for office and could do more damage after inciting a mob that violently ransacked the U.S. Capitol last Wednesday.

“President Trump gravely endangered the security of the United States and its institutions of Government,” reads the four-page impeachment bill.

“He will remain a threat to national security, democracy, and the Constitution if allowed to remain in office,” it reads.

— Associated Press

7:30 AM - January 12, 2021
7:30 AM - January 12, 2021

Several Capitol Police officers suspended over actions related to D.C. rally, riot

A mob of Trump supporters climbs scaffolding and take to the steps of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington on Wednesday.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
A mob of Trump supporters climbs scaffolding and take to the steps of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington on Wednesday.

Several U.S. Capitol Police officers have been suspended and more than a dozen others are under investigation for suspected involvement with or inappropriate support for the demonstration last week that turned into a deadly riot at the Capitol, according to members of Congress, police officials and staff members briefed on the developments.

Eight separate investigations have been launched into the actions of Capitol officers, according to one congressional aide who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe the status of the internal review.

In one of the cases, officers had posted what Capitol Police investigators found to be messages showing support for the rally on Wednesday that preceded the attack on the complex, including touting President Trump’s baseless contention that the election had been stolen through voter fraud, the aide said.

Investigators in another instance found that a Capitol officer had posted “inappropriate” images of President-elect Joe Biden on a social media account. The aide declined to describe the photographs.

— Washington Post

7:15 AM - January 12, 2021
7:15 AM - January 12, 2021

Philly detective reassigned following D.C. rally called Pence a ‘traitor’

The Philadelphia police detective reassigned after attending President Donald Trump’s rally in Washington — which ended with the president inciting his supporters to storm the Capitol — called Vice President Mike Pence a “traitor and a cabal operative” after he condemned the violence and publicly lamented an officer’s death.

“You’re a swap creature and fooled us all!” Detective Jennifer Gugger posted on Twitter on Friday, according to a screenshot reviewed by The Inquirer before it was taken down.

“You sold your soul to the devil,” she wrote two days earlier.

A screenshot from the Twitter account of Philadelphia Police Detective Jennifer Gugger. The account was taken down by Monday morning,
screenshot
A screenshot from the Twitter account of Philadelphia Police Detective Jennifer Gugger. The account was taken down by Monday morning,

Gugger’s social media postings emerged Monday as the city’s police union came to her defense and Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw pledged to take “swift and definitive action” against any Philadelphia police officer found to have participated in the lawlessness that took place at the Capitol.

“The PPD supports all lawful expressions of First-Amendment rights, but the attack on the Capitol Building went well beyond the rights of free speech,” Outlaw said in a statement. “I can assure the public that a full and thorough investigation will take place, and ask that anyone with additional information reach out to our Internal Affairs Bureau.”

— Mike Newall and William Bender

7:00 AM - January 12, 2021
7:00 AM - January 12, 2021

Tuesday morning roundup: Second lawmaker contracts COVID-19 following Capitol siege

Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D., Wash.) speaks during a July House Judiciary subcommittee hearing.
Mandel Ngan / AP
Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D., Wash.) speaks during a July House Judiciary subcommittee hearing.