8:36 PM - January 13, 2021
8:36 PM - January 13, 2021

Big fines for House members who refuse to be screened for guns, Pelosi proposes

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is pushing for hefty fines for members who refuse to walk through newly installed metal detectors.

The screening protocol to guard against weapons being brought into the House chamber was started on Tuesday following the violent breach of the Capitol last Wednesday.

Some Republican members refused to go through the detectors and some were involved in brief confrontations with the Capitol Police. Republicans argued that their Second Amendment right to carry guns was being violated. Some Democrats reportedly groused in private.

On Monday, the House will vote on a proposed rule to impose a $5,000 fine for the first offense and $10,000 for a second offense, said Pelosi, the California Democrat. The fines would be deducted directly from the members’ pay.

“On behalf of the House, I express my deepest gratitude to the U.S. Capitol Police for the valor that they showed during the deadly insurrection on the Capitol, as they protected the lives of the staff and the Congress,” Pelosi said in a statement.

“Sadly, just days later, many House Republicans have disrespected our heroes by verbally abusing them and refusing to adhere to basic precautions keeping members of our Congressional community, including the Capitol Police, safe. The House will soon move forward with a rule change imposing fines on those who refuse to abide by these protections. The fine for the first offense will be $5,000 and $10,000 for the second offense. The fines will be deducted directly from Members’ salaries by the Chief Administrative Officer,” she said.

“It is tragic that this step is necessary, but the Chamber of the People’s House must and will be safe.”

— Robert Moran

7:10 PM - January 13, 2021
7:10 PM - January 13, 2021

Trump makes no mention of impeachment in first video after House vote

Following a House vote to impeach him for inciting an attack on the Capitol, President Donald Trump released a video statement Wednesday evening that did not respond directly to that action or even acknowledge it, but instead sought to condemn the violence and distance himself from the riot he incited.

In the 5-minute 12-second video released on the White House Twitter account — Trump’s personal Twitter account was permanently suspended last week — he called his supporters to refrain from violence, saying “no true supporter of mine could ever threaten or harass their fellow Americans.”

Last Wednesday, Trump spoke to his supporters and repeatedly called for them to “fight” for him before many breached the Capitol in a riot. In an unrelenting effort to rile his supporters since the election, he has falsely claimed that widespread fraud was the cause of his defeat, and has not conceded.

In his video message, he did not back away from those statements — nor did he repeat them — but pleaded for unity.

”Violence and vandalism have absolutely no place in our country and no place in our movement,” he said.

Addressing reports that demonstrations could erupt in the days leading to President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration, Trump said that “every American deserves to have their voice heard in a respectful and peaceful way” and called for peace. He said thousands of National Guard troops had been mobilized to ensure a “safe transition.”

— Robert Moran

6:02 PM - January 13, 2021
6:02 PM - January 13, 2021

How the House voted on Trump’s second impeachment

5:46 PM - January 13, 2021
5:46 PM - January 13, 2021

SEPTA officers not believed to have stormed the Capitol, says police chief

SEPTA Police Chief Thomas J. Nestel III said Wednesday that an ongoing investigation has not found evidence that seven transit officers who attended President Donald Trump’s rally in Washington had stormed the Capitol.

“It looks pretty good that when things turned bad our off-duty officers headed for the bus,” Nestel said. “At this point, the investigation is focused on whether any departmental regulations were violated, not crimes.”

None of the seven officers have been placed on restricted duty, he said. According to the department’s collective bargaining agreement, their names cannot be released unless they are terminated, Nestel said. But Nestel said he expects the findings of the investigation to be released sometime next week.

“The conclusion will be the conclusion — and that will be publicized,” he said.

A Philadelphia Police detective had her gun taken away after attending the Jan. 6 rally and posting vitriolic, far-right rhetoric on social media, including calling Vice President Mike Pence a traitor and pedophile.

— Mike Newall

4:53 PM - January 13, 2021
4:53 PM - January 13, 2021

Trump was in Oval Office during impeachment vote

President Donald Trump was in the Oval Office as the House of Representatives voted to impeach him.

Trump on Wednesday became the first president to be impeached twice. The vote came days after he fomented a violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by telling his supporters to “fight like hell” against election results that he falsely told them were rigged.

Trump, who has been suspended from social media platforms, was expected to respond to the vote in a taped video to be released later Wednesday.

— Associated Press

4:40 PM - January 13, 2021
4:40 PM - January 13, 2021

House impeaches Trump for ‘incitement of insurrection’

President Donald Trump, seen here in Texas on Tuesday, became the first president ever to be impeached twice on Wednesday.
delcia lopez / AP
President Donald Trump, seen here in Texas on Tuesday, became the first president ever to be impeached twice on Wednesday.

The House voted to impeach President Donald Trump for “incitement of insurrection” in the Capitol attack, making him the first president to be impeached twice.

Ten Republicans joined Democrats in calling for Trump’s impeachment after his followers staged a deadly riot at the Capitol in an attempt to delay the certification of President-elect Joe Biden’s election victory.

The Senate will now hold a trial, where Democrats would need at least 17 Republicans to support Trump’s conviction. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) won’t invoke powers calling senators into emergency session, meaning the trial will likely take place after Biden’s inauguration on Jan. 20.

— Rob Tornoe

3:55 PM - January 13, 2021
3:55 PM - January 13, 2021

Seventh Republican announces vote for impeachment

Just before debate on the House floor ended, Rep. Peter Meijer (R., Mich.) announced he would vote to impeach President Trump.

“The President betrayed his oath of office by seeking to undermine out constitution process, and he bears responsibility for inciting the violent acts of insurrection last week,” Meijer said in a statement.

Meijer is the seventh House Republican to announce they will vote to impeach Trump.

— Rob Tornoe

3:02 PM - January 13, 2021
3:02 PM - January 13, 2021

‘Stop the Steal’ organizer says three Republicans helped plan D.C. rally

Weeks before a mob of President Donald Trump’s supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol, right-wing activist Ali Alexander told his followers that he was planning something big for Jan. 6.

Alexander, who organized the “Stop the Steal” movement, said he hatched the plan — coinciding with Congress’s vote to certify the electoral college votes — alongside three GOP lawmakers: Reps. Andy Biggs, Ariz., Mo Brooks, Ala., and Paul Gosar, Ariz., all hard-line Trump supporters.

“We four schemed up of putting maximum pressure on Congress while they were voting,” Alexander said in a since-deleted video on Periscope highlighted by the Project on Government Oversight, an investigative nonprofit. The plan, he said, was to “change the hearts and the minds of Republicans who were in that body, hearing our loud roar from outside.”

After riots inside the Capitol left five people dead — and Alexander and his group were banned from Twitter this week — those three GOP lawmakers are now under increasing scrutiny over their role in aiding the right-wing activist.

In a statement to The Washington Post, a spokesman for Biggs said the congressman had never been in contact with Alexander or other protesters and denied that he had helped organize a rally on Jan. 6. Neither Brooks nor Gosar responded to requests for comment from The Washington Post.

— Washington Post

2:30 PM - January 13, 2021
2:30 PM - January 13, 2021

New Jersey braces for possible unrest in Trenton

New Jersey law enforcement officials are bracing for possible unrest at the State Capitol in Trenton in the week to come, though they said they knew of no specific threats.

“Color us in the category of preparing for the worst,” Gov. Phil Murphy said. “And erring on the side of over preparing instead of under preparing.”

National guard members from New Jersey were sent to D.C. last week to help in the aftermath of the insurrection, but state police Col. Patrick Callahan assured that the deployment would not leave the state exposed and that New Jersey will have enough guard members at the ready.

Officials said it was too early to get a sense of how much real planning was circulating online for any protests, but Murphy warned that law enforcement officers won’t hesitate to make arrests.

“If you want to protest and use violent means, we will have no patience and we will have no reservations about using the fullest extent of the law against you,” he said. “And please don’t test us.”

Murphy also asked those interested in peaceful protests to hold off for the time being.

“This is a bad week to be out there,” he said. “I’m begging people to stay home and stay safe.”

Trenton Mayor W. Reed Gusciora echoed Murphy’s sentiments. Calling last week’s attack in Washington, D.C. “unthinkable,” Gusciora said he’s “hopeful we won’t have a similar outcome in Trenton.”

”Our police department is working at this moment with the N.J. State Police, the Mercer County Sheriff’s Department and the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office as part of a coordinated plan to ensure our safety if any protesters stray beyond the First Amendment right to peaceful protest,” Gusciora said.

He said officials are preparing after a flier online urged armed protests at state capitals, including Trenton, on Sunday. On Wednesday, Jared Maples, director of the New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, also released a statement saying the unit is “taking proactive steps to halt possible attempts at violence” for the weekend.

Maples urged the public to report any suspicious activity to local authorities or NJOHSP’s Counterterrorism Watch Desk at 1-866-4-SAFE-NJ or tips@njohsp.gov.

Officials in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania’s capital have said they are not aware of specific threats to the areas, but are prepared to implement additional security and are monitoring the situation.

— Allison Steele, Oona Goodin-Smith

2:15 PM - January 13, 2021
2:15 PM - January 13, 2021

Republican leader says Trump bears responsibility, but won’t vote to impeach

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R., Calif.) said Trump bears responsibility for last week's riot at the Capitol, but said a vote to impeach the president "would further divide" the country.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R., Calif.) said Trump bears responsibility for last week's riot at the Capitol, but said a vote to impeach the president "would further divide" the country.

House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy says President Donald Trump “bears responsibility” for last week’s storming of the Capitol by his supporters.

McCarthy, a close Trump ally, says the president “should have immediately denounced the mob when he saw what was unfolding.”

But McCarthy also says he believes it would be a mistake to impeach Trump in such a short time frame. Trump leaves office on Jan. 20 when Joe Biden is inaugurated.

McCarthy says “a vote to impeach would further divide this nation, a vote to impeach will further fan the flames, the partisan division.”

The California lawmaker is calling instead for a fact-finding commission and censure resolution.

— Associated Press

2:05 PM - January 13, 2021
2:05 PM - January 13, 2021

Trump urges his supporters not to commit further violence

President Donald Trump urged his supporters to not commit further violence a week after inciting them to overrun the Capitol in a deadly riot aimed at delaying the certification of the election results.

In a statement issued Wednesday, Trump called for “NO violence, NO lawbreaking and NO vandalism of any kind” following reports of planned protests in state capitals across the country.

Trump also called on Americans to “ease tensions and calm tempers,” even as he continues to reject his role in inciting violence and has yet to concede to President-elect Joe Biden, who will be inaugurated on Jan. 20.

— Rob Tornoe

1:36 PM - January 13, 2021
1:36 PM - January 13, 2021

Sixth House Republican announces vote to impeach Trump

Rep. Dan Newhouse (R., Wash.) announced on the House floor Wednesday afternoon he will vote to impeach President Donald Trump, the sixth House Republican to join with Democrats following the deadly riot on the Capitol last week.

“There is no excuse for President Trump’s actions,” Newshouse said. “Last week there was a domestic threat at the door of the Capitol, and he did nothing to stop it.”

The six House Republicans who have said they will vote for Trump’s impeachment are:

  • Liz Cheney of Wyoming
  • John Katko of New York
  • Adam Kinzinger of Illinois
  • Fred Upton of Michigan
  • Herrera Beutler of Washington
  • Dan Newhouse of Washington

— Rob Tornoe

1:36 PM - January 13, 2021
1:36 PM - January 13, 2021

McConnell rejects call for quick impeachment trial

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., walks from the Senate floor to his office on Capitol Hill Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., walks from the Senate floor to his office on Capitol Hill Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington.

If the House impeaches President Donald Trump, a Senate trial on whether to convict him of inciting insurrection seems all but certain to have to wait until President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated.

That’s the word from a spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The spokesman says aides to the Kentucky Republican have told Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer’s staff that McConnell won’t agree to invoke powers calling senators into emergency session.

That means the Senate almost certainly won’t meet again until Jan. 19. That’s the day before Biden’s inauguration.

In a statement, McConnell confirmed reports he is considering whether to vote to convict Trump during the Senate’s trial.

“While the press has been full of speculation, I have not made a final decision on how I will vote and I intend to listen to the legal arguments when they are presented to the Senate,” McConnell said.

— Associated Press

1:13 PM - January 13, 2021
1:13 PM - January 13, 2021

Prosecutors cite Capitol siege to revoke bail for man arrested on weapons charges near Pa. Convention Center

Philadelphia prosecutors are seeking to revoke bail for Antonio LaMotta, the armed QAnon adherent from Virginia who was arrested on weapons charges near the Pennsylvania Convention Center as votes from November’s election were being tabulated.

Prosecutors cited new evidence on Tuesday showing that LaMotta was allegedly present, along with his co-defendant in the weapons case, Joshua Macias, inside the security perimeter at last week’s riot in Washington D.C.

Macias, a co-founder of Vets for Trump, is also in danger of having his bail revoked after prosecutors filed a similar motion last week.

LaMotta, 61, and Macias, 42, are due in court Thursday on charges of illegally carrying firearms in Philadelphia on November 5. They drove up from Virginia, in a Hummer displaying the insignia of the QAnon conspiracy movement, with handguns, an AR-15-style rifle, 160 rounds of ammunition, and a samurai sword, to allegedly interfere in the vote counting process, prosecutors allege.

Tuesday’s bail revocation motion says that LaMotta was by Macias’ side in Washington as Macias “gave a speech to a crowd inciting a riot.”

“Defend this Constitution against foreign and domestic enemies,” Macias told the crowd, according to a transcript submitted by prosecutors. “Those domestic enemies are here…The enemy is not at the gate, the enemy is already here.”

Macias and LaMotta are both out on 10 percent of $750,000 bail.

LaMotta’s attorney Lauren Wimmer declined to comment Wednesday.

Macias’ attorney, William J. Brennan, said he intended to fight the motion, saying he draws a distinction between people who were at the rally — even those who on entered the area around the Capitol — and what he described as the “criminal lunatics” who stormed and trashed the building.

As for the video prosecutors cited, Brennan argued that it doesn’t show Macias egging on any criminal activity. “It’s not inciting anything; it’s expressing an opinion,” he said. “He references the vice president. I don’t share his opinion, but he has a right to that opinion. It’s the bedrock of our freedoms as American citizens…If you want to look at incendiary speech, look at the president.”

Prosecutors noted in their bail-revocation motion that LaMotta, a security contractor, has a history of posting paranoid and racist content online, as well as far-flung conspiracy theories. On a business page for LaMotta’s firm, a blog posts states that, “COVID-19 is an entirely man-made fake ‘natural pandemic’ psyop crisis with a patented, laboratory ‘gain of function’ bioweapon as its disease.”

William Bender and Jeremy Roebuck

12:39 PM - January 13, 2021
12:39 PM - January 13, 2021

Pelosi calls Trump a ‘a clear and present danger to the nation’

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi called President Donald Trump “a clear and present danger to the nation” and called on her colleagues to vote in favor of impeachment following a deadly riot on the Capitol he helped incite.

“The President of the United States incited this insurrection, this armed rebellion, against our common country. He must go,” Pelosi said on the floor of the House Wednesday afternoon.

Pelosi citied Trump’s repeated lies about the outcome of the election, which he lost to President-elect Joe Biden, and claimed the president saw the insurrections as a means to delay or stop the certification of Biden’s victory.

“They were domestic terrorists and justice must prevail. But they did not appear out of a vacuum,” Pelosi said. “They were sent here, sent here by the president, with words such as a cry to ‘fight like hell.’ Words matter. Truth matters. Accountability matters.”

— Rob Tornoe

11:43 AM - January 13, 2021
11:43 AM - January 13, 2021

Pa. GOP senator who rallied outside the U.S. Capitol tells supporters not to protest

Pennsylvania state Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, speaks to supporters of President Donald Trump as they demonstrate outside the Pennsylvania State Capitol, Saturday, Nov. 7, 2020, in Harrisburg, Pa.
Julio Cortez / AP
Pennsylvania state Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, speaks to supporters of President Donald Trump as they demonstrate outside the Pennsylvania State Capitol, Saturday, Nov. 7, 2020, in Harrisburg, Pa.

A Republican state senator who helped lead the unsuccessful charge in Harrisburg to overturn the results of the presidential election in Pennsylvania is now urging supporters not to participate in protests ahead of Joe Biden’s inauguration next week.

”Please, do not participate in rallies or protests over [the] next 10 days,” State Sen. Doug Mastriano (R., Franklin) said on Twitter. “Let’s focus on praying for our nation during these troubling times.”

Mastriano, a potential candidate for governor next year, spent months echoing President Trump’s false claims that the election was rigged. Mastriano traveled to Washington for last week’s rally outside the U.S. Capitol — and his campaign spent thousands of dollars on charter buses a week before Trump’s “Save America” rally, WHYY reported.

Mastriano has said he and his wife made the trip to support Trump but left Washington when “it was apparent that this was no longer a peaceful protest.”

Democrats called on him to resign after a pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol.

Andrew Seidman

11:25 AM - January 13, 2021
11:25 AM - January 13, 2021

Pa. congressman isn’t sure he can work with ‘morally blind’ Republicans who tried to overturn the election

Rep. Conor Lamb (D., Pa.), seen here in September in the front yard of his Mt. Lebanon home.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
Rep. Conor Lamb (D., Pa.), seen here in September in the front yard of his Mt. Lebanon home.

U.S. Rep. Conor Lamb is known for a willingness to work across the aisle.

But after a mob stormed the Capitol last week and 139 House Republicans still voted to overturn the results of the presidential election, the moderate Democrat from Southwestern Pennsylvania said he’s not sure he can stomach working with those lawmakers again.

“It’s going to be very difficult to reason with them,” said Lamb, who regularly prayed with several of the Republicans who pushed President Donald Trump’s false claims of a stolen election and even worked on infrastructure legislation with one of them.

“Some of these Republican members are just refusing to see the connection between their own words and what the mob did when it attacked, even though the connection is plain as day,” Lamb said in an interview before a House vote Wednesday to impeach Trump for his role in inciting the attack. “They’ve become morally blind to the consequences of their own actions.”

— Jessica Calefati

10:40 AM - January 13, 2021
10:40 AM - January 13, 2021

Airbnb will block and cancel all Washington D.C. reservations ahead of inauguration

Airbnb will block and cancel all reservations in the Washington, D.C. metro area next week to help limit travel to President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration, the company announced Wednesday.

Guests will receive full refunds for any reservations that have already been made, and all future reservations in Washington, D.C. will be blocked, citing calls from local leaders for visitors not to travel to the nationals capital.

The company said it was also making the move after reports emerged about armed militias and known hate groups attempting to travel and disrupt the Inauguration. The company also said it has banned several individuals “confirmed to have been responsible for the violent criminal activity at the United States Capitol on January 6.”

— Rob Tornoe

10:14 AM - January 13, 2021
10:14 AM - January 13, 2021

New York City terminating Trump contracts because of Capitol insurrection

New York City will terminate business contracts with President Donald Trump after last week’s insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Wednesday.

“I’m here to announce that the city of New York is severing all contracts with the Trump Organization,” de Blasio said in an interview on MSNBC.

De Blasio said the Trump Organization earns about $17 million a year in profits from its contracts to run two ice skating rinks and a carousel in Central Park as well as a golf course in the Bronx.

The city can legally terminate a contract if the leadership of a company is engaged in criminal activity, the Democratic mayor said. “Inciting an insurrection — let’s be very clear, let’s say the words again — inciting an insurrection against the United States government clearly constitutes criminal activity,” he said.

— Associated Press

10:00 AM - January 13, 2021
10:00 AM - January 13, 2021

As House debates impeachment, armed troops surround the Capitol

Hundreds of National Guard troops hold inside the Capitol Visitor's Center to reinforce security at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP
Hundreds of National Guard troops hold inside the Capitol Visitor's Center to reinforce security at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021.

Inside the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Wednesday morning, lawmakers debated the impeachment of President Donald Trump over his role in citing last week’s deadly insurrection.

Outside, members of the National Guard armed themselves and swarmed the Capitol in an unprecedented show of force ahead of President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration on Jan. 20.

Overnight, members of the National Guard slept inside the Capitol, spread out across the building’s cold, marble floors.

On Tuesday, the Department of Defense announced that armed National Guard members have been authorized to support U.S. Capitol security. Up to 15,000 National Guard troops have been made available.

“National Guard members are postured to meet the requirements of the supported civil authorities, up to and including protective equipment and being armed if necessary,” Capt. Chelsi Johnson, spokesperson for the D.C. National Guard, said in a statement to CNN.

— Rob Tornoe

9:25 AM - January 13, 2021
9:25 AM - January 13, 2021

Lies sent Trump supporters to Washington. Can Big Tech bans stop the misinformation?

A Trump Supporter is bleeding after an injury sustained while trying to push past police through the doorway of the Capital Building, in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
A Trump Supporter is bleeding after an injury sustained while trying to push past police through the doorway of the Capital Building, in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021.

Lisa Mickles sat on a bus heading from Harrisburg to Washington last week and pulled up her phone to check the latest on Parler, a social media network favored by Trump supporters that is replete with conspiracy theories and misinformation.

”Did you see about this Italy thing?” she asked. “They found somebody in Italy that started changing the votes. It’s the first time they have proof. I didn’t get a chance to really listen, but it seems pretty messed up.”

No one in Italy changed votes. There is no evidence of widespread fraud or any kind of rigging in the presidential election. But the 52-minute video to which Mickles referred, in which a woman baselessly claims vote tallies were manipulated in Rome, has been watched more than 100,000 times.

For Mickles and the people with whom she traveled to Washington, videos like this have fueled the myth that the 2020 election was stolen from President Donald Trump. The president’s relentless false claims of fraud and calls for his supporters to show up in Washington and “fight” helped incite the violent mob that stormed the Capitol. Five people died in or near the Capitol, including a police officer.

As the precursors to the attack come into focus, Apple, Amazon, and Google have removed from their platforms social media sites like Parler, where users called for violence at the Capitol. Twitter and Facebook suspended Trump’s accounts, and some supporters have distanced themselves from Trump and his baseless claims of fraud.

But Trump’s most faithful followers are even more convinced that their news — the news that led to the Capitol attack — is the real story, now being unfairly censored.

”They’re ripping the First Amendment out,” Richard Pruett, a photographer and Trump supporter from Drexel Hill, said Monday. “In 2021, what are the most popular forms of communication? It’s social media. To suspend somebody from getting their message across … it’s a disgrace.”

— Julia Terruso

8:45 AM - January 13, 2021
8:45 AM - January 13, 2021

Watch live: House impeachment proceedings against Trump

Impeachment proceedings in the House of Representatives are scheduled to begin at 9 a.m., with a final vote expected to take place later Wednesday afternoon.

Here is a livestream of the impeachment proceedings, courtesy of PBS:

— Rob Tornoe

7:50 AM - January 13, 2021
7:50 AM - January 13, 2021

At least five Republicans will join Democrats in impeachment vote against Trump

Rep. Liz Cheney (R., Wyo.) backs the effort in the House to impeach Trump, saying the president "summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack."
Matt McClain
Rep. Liz Cheney (R., Wyo.) backs the effort in the House to impeach Trump, saying the president "summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack."

President Donald Trump is on the verge of being impeached for a second time, the House planning the unprecedented vote one week after he encouraged a mob of loyalists to “fight like hell” against election results and the U.S. Capitol became the target of a deadly siege.

While the first impeachment of Trump last year brought no Republican votes in the House, at least five Republican lawmakers, including third-ranking House GOP leader Liz Cheney of Wyoming, have announced they would vote to impeach Trump.

Trump, who would become the only U.S. president twice impeached, faces a single charge of “incitement of insurrection.” The House is expected to get underway at 9 a.m. Wednesday.

The impeachment bill draws from Trump’s own false statements about his election defeat to Biden. Judges across the country, including some nominated by Trump, have repeatedly dismissed cases challenging the election results, and former Attorney General William Barr, a Trump ally, has said there was no sign of widespread fraud.

Like the resolution to invoke the 25th Amendment, the impeachment bill also details Trump’s pressure on state officials in Georgia to “find” him more votes and his White House rally rant to “fight like hell” by heading to the Capitol.

— Rob Tornoe and the Associated Press

7:30 AM - January 13, 2021
7:30 AM - January 13, 2021

Philadelphia police take detective’s gun amid probe of her attendance at Trump rally

Philadelphia police have taken away a detective’s gun amid a probe into her attendance at the Washington rally where President Donald Trump incited his followers to storm the Capitol.

Detective Jennifer Gugger, 51, had already been reassigned from her position as a background checker for police recruits, after the department’s Internal Affairs division received social media posts showing that she had attended the rally.

This latest action comes after Gugger’s vitriolic, far-right rhetoric on social media was made public Monday — including a tweet in which she called Vice President Mike Pence a “traitor and a cabal operative and pedophile” after he condemned the Jan. 6 insurrection and publicly lamented the death of a Capitol police officer.

In another tweet, sent just hours after the attack, Gugger, whose job included reviewing recruits’ social media activity, told Pence he was filled with “the deadly sin of greed” and had sold his soul to the devil.

A screenshot from the Twitter account of Philadelphia Police Detective Jennifer Gugger. The account was taken down by Monday morning,
screenshot
A screenshot from the Twitter account of Philadelphia Police Detective Jennifer Gugger. The account was taken down by Monday morning,

“A decision was made during the investigation to take her gun and place her on restricted duty,” said Sgt. Eric Gripp, a department spokesperson.

— Mike Newall

7:15 AM - January 13, 2021
7:15 AM - January 13, 2021

Trump has been suspended from YouTube

YouTube suspended President Trump from uploading new videos to his official account for at least a week, joining fellow social media giants Twitter and Facebook in shutting the president out of his account due to concerns his posts will incite violence.

YouTube — the last of the major social media networks to suspend Trump after the attack on the U.S. Capitol — said it removed new content uploaded to the president’s account for violating its policies and “in light of concerns about the ongoing potential for violence.”

The video-streaming service owned by Google will not allow Trump to add new videos for a minimum of seven days, it said in a Twitter post late Tuesday. It will also disable comments on his channel indefinitely.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

— Washington Post

7:00 AM - January 13, 2021
7:00 AM - January 13, 2021

Trump supporter brought a truckload of weapons to the Capitol, prosecutors say

Pro-Trump rioters struggle with police to try and take control of a door at the Capitol building, January 06, 2021.
JESSICA GRIFFIN / Staff Photographer
Pro-Trump rioters struggle with police to try and take control of a door at the Capitol building, January 06, 2021.

Prosecutors say an Alabama man arrested near the Capitol after the attack had a truckload of weapons, including components for 11 explosive devices, guns, smoke devices and machetes, along with a note containing information about a member of Congress.

Federal prosecutors wrote in court documents Tuesday that the note and volume of weapons that 70-year-old Lonnie Leroy Coffman had in his truck suggest he had “an intent to provide them to others” and to attack members of Congress. Coffman was charged with multiple firearms crimes.

In asking for Coffman to remain jailed until trial, prosecutors noted that he had dangerous incendiary mixtures creating napalm and appeared to be motivated to conduct violence against elected representatives.

The note in the truck referred to a judge appointed by President Barack Obama as a “bad guy” and gave the name of a member of Congress, noting the representative is of Muslim faith.

Coffman’s lawyer didn’t immediately respond to an email from The Associated Press seeking comment late Tuesday.

— Associated Press

6:45 AM - January 13, 2021
6:45 AM - January 13, 2021

Wednesday morning roundup: N.J. rep. says lawmakers held ‘reconnaissance’ tours before riot

Rep. Mikie Sherrill (D., N.J.), talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington back in 2019.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP
Rep. Mikie Sherrill (D., N.J.), talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington back in 2019.
  • Rep. Mikie Sherrill (D., N.J.) said in a live webcast she witnessed some members of Congress leading people through the Capitol on Jan. 5 in what she termed a “reconnaissance for the next day,” according to the Bergen Record.
  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, (R., Ky), has been telling associates since the attack that Trump probably committed impeachable offenses, the New York Times and other outlets report. McConnell, a close adviser said, has not decided how he will vote on impeachment and wants to hear the case first.
  • The U.S. Capitol Police have initiated immediate road closures surrounding the Capitol “until further notice,” according to a notice sent to Capitol Hill offices. “There will be no public access to the Capitol Grounds during the Inauguration, and the event will go on as scheduled,” Capitol Police Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman said in a statement.